Your opinion on best 4x4 for long-term camping

Kippie

Well-Known Member
We travel long distances over long periods (3months+) in our 2016 Amarok dual cab 4 cylinder. When we chose the vehicle our main criteria were economy, reliability and comfort as well as decent payload. The Amaroks had early teething problems that have been eliminated in the later models.

The car is regularly maintained and serviced by a 4wd specialist workshop. So far no issues whatsoever. Fully loaded we get between 10-11 l/100 km per trip covering outback conditions.

The car is very quiet except for the tyre hum (Cooper STmaxx) and with the TJM XGS suspension it is also very comfortable on all road surfaces. We have regularly covered 800km/day (dirt or bitumen) which is only limited by our desire to only drive between sunrise and sunset (no bullbar).

We carry a maximum of 120 liters water and 140 liters of fuel which gives us a reliable range of 1000km and ten days between resupplies. We have found that more than adequate for our trips.

Our camping gear started with a quick setup ground tent, but soon we installed a rooftop tent which we use mainly for overnighters. We still carry the ground tent for when we stay multiple nights in one spot. The stretcher beds beat the rtt hands down in comfort. We have also added an awning and shower ensuite to the roof rack.

All the camping gear up and tools are inside an abs canopy which I have made dustproof. Food, clothes water and fridge are where the back seat once was. For secondary battery I use a simple Coleman portable unit which powers the fridge and air compressor. The unit is charged by the alternator through a simple vsr. It's a foolproof and reliable system.

All up I estimate that besides purchasing the vehicle we spent under $10,000 for accessories and camping gear to have a reliable, economical and comfortable long range tourer.

Hope this long story helps in your considerations.
 

ShaneM

New Member
We travel long distances over long periods (3months+) in our 2016 Amarok dual cab 4 cylinder. When we chose the vehicle our main criteria were economy, reliability and comfort as well as decent payload. The Amaroks had early teething problems that have been eliminated in the later models.

The car is regularly maintained and serviced by a 4wd specialist workshop. So far no issues whatsoever. Fully loaded we get between 10-11 l/100 km per trip covering outback conditions.

The car is very quiet except for the tyre hum (Cooper STmaxx) and with the TJM XGS suspension it is also very comfortable on all road surfaces. We have regularly covered 800km/day (dirt or bitumen) which is only limited by our desire to only drive between sunrise and sunset (no bullbar).

We carry a maximum of 120 liters water and 140 liters of fuel which gives us a reliable range of 1000km and ten days between resupplies. We have found that more than adequate for our trips.

Our camping gear started with a quick setup ground tent, but soon we installed a rooftop tent which we use mainly for overnighters. We still carry the ground tent for when we stay multiple nights in one spot. The stretcher beds beat the rtt hands down in comfort. We have also added an awning and shower ensuite to the roof rack.

All the camping gear up and tools are inside an abs canopy which I have made dustproof. Food, clothes water and fridge are where the back seat once was. For secondary battery I use a simple Coleman portable unit which powers the fridge and air compressor. The unit is charged by the alternator through a simple vsr. It's a foolproof and reliable system.

All up I estimate that besides purchasing the vehicle we spent under $10,000 for accessories and camping gear to have a reliable, economical and comfortable long range tourer.

Hope this long story helps in your considerations.
That's excellent and helps a tonne.

Thank you!
 

Batts88

Well-Known Member
I would suggest a ute single cabs are ok but an extra cab will give you more room behind the seats you can but a canopy, set it up to suit which will take time even put a hard top camper on the canopy roof if you want to sleep off the ground and a solar panel on the cabin roof on a roof rack. Or you could fit something like a Trayon slide on which is already decked out with fridge water tank cooking gear battery etc etc then add solar to the cabin roof . Don't forget a long range fuel tank.
 

Lost1?

Well-Known Member
A mate of mine has a extra cab Ranger with a canopy and roof top tent. It is a good set up and a nicer drive than the 76 or 79 series cruisers.

As an alternative if you aren't going on challenging tracks that often why not something like a MU-X and camper trailer. You can always drop the camper for a few days at a time if needed.
 

Rusty Panels

Well-Known Member
I would be interested to see how all the modern vehicles hold up to years of use. Not so much the engines and drivetrains but the electronic gadgetry that you can't escape from on new vehicles.
I like simple so have recently sold my Hi Tech Ford Everest and gone back to an older model Landcruiser 100 Series. At least if it develops a problem when I'm out in the sticks there is a fair chance that I will be able to fix it. The problem with these hi tech vehicles in my opinion is that they have way too much in them that can go wrong. If you don't have access to a computer to diagnose an issue then your going home on a tilt tray.
 

Batts88

Well-Known Member
I would be interested to see how all the modern vehicles hold up to years of use. Not so much the engines and drivetrains but the electronic gadgetry that you can't escape from on new vehicles.
I like simple so have recently sold my Hi Tech Ford Everest and gone back to an older model Landcruiser 100 Series. At least if it develops a problem when I'm out in the sticks there is a fair chance that I will be able to fix it. The problem with these hi tech vehicles in my opinion is that they have way too much in them that can go wrong. If you don't have access to a computer to diagnose an issue then your going home on a tilt tray.
Some of the hiluxes have small electrical issues on mine sites I've worked at over the past couple of yrs probably dust related. They get driven hard by some people but don't see corrugated roads creek crossing etc. Also I reckon the roof space above the back seats is lower these days I'm 5' 9" and my head touches I wouldn't buy one.
 

Kippie

Well-Known Member
I would be interested to see how all the modern vehicles hold up to years of use. Not so much the engines and drivetrains but the electronic gadgetry that you can't escape from on new vehicles.
I like simple so have recently sold my Hi Tech Ford Everest and gone back to an older model Landcruiser 100 Series. At least if it develops a problem when I'm out in the sticks there is a fair chance that I will be able to fix it. The problem with these hi tech vehicles in my opinion is that they have way too much in them that can go wrong. If you don't have access to a computer to diagnose an issue then your going home on a tilt tray.
I started 4wding 40 odd years ago in an FJ55 and did all the maintenance myself. Now I have an Amarok and let specialists do all the maintenance work. I would never go back to my old Toyota, it's a cart compared to the Amarok. I did the lap in the Amarok without one issue, she is reliable as can be and I am about to do it again. I do carry an ODBC reader which I use regularly to check for any issues.
 

Rusty Panels

Well-Known Member
I agree with all of the comments regarding comfort etc however, if you are stuck in the middle of nowhere with a check engine light, vehicle in thumb suck mode and a weird code that is telling you that there is a fault in the Adblue heating system good luck fixing it!
Been there done that!
 
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