Wonnangatta Valley

BUSHNUT

Well-Known Member
The considered Mecca for Victorian 4WD drivers, known for the tragic murders, the grave yard makes one appreciate how far from the outside world this place was in the early part of the last century.

Camping is free, there are a number of long drop dunnies . It is part of the National Alpine Park .

There are 3 ways into the Wonnangatta, from the Buffalo Valley there is Riley's track, from the Western there is the Zeka Spur track and from the southern end , Wombat Sput track which turns onto Hernes Spur track

Hope the pictures inspire you to make the journey.

Bushnut
 

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Nickj

5th Annual Victorian Gathering member
Yeah Bushnut

We went there Easter last year for an overnighter. We went to Licola then down Zeka Spur Tk, did Wombat Spur too. We camped just before the Valley as we were running out of light. Found a nice flat spot near the river and set up camp. Surprised a few with the Pathfinder at the top of Wombat Spur Tk, they wondered how it got up there, the Pathy hardly raised a sweat!

Great trip, wouldn't say it was simple, but need clearance. I think I still had my OEM HT tyres on then too!

We were lucky to see some people from Save the Wonnongatta Homestead Society there so bought some stubby holders to help their cause.

Nick
 

Traveller

Well-Known Member
Great place, was in there Anzac w/e.
Went in via Zeka, out Wombat, Hernes Spur-even had a bit of snow falling on the ridge.
Very greasy getting out, had to drop the muddies down to about 12psi.
 

Knackers

4x4 Earth Contributer
Hi Bushnut, good call, Wonnogatta is a great place. We found it popular and I imagine it would be busy over over long weekends. From memory Zeka track seemed to take quite a while to descend.

Cemetary in middle of nowwhere is interesting. We didn't pick up a stubby holder like Nickj did though.

Cheers
Knackers
 

BUSHNUT

Well-Known Member
Hi Bushnut, good call, Wonnogatta is a great place. We found it popular and I imagine it would be busy over over long weekends. From memory Zeka track seemed to take quite a while to descend.

Cemetary in middle of nowwhere is interesting. We didn't pick up a stubby holder like Nickj did though.

Cheers
Knackers

When I was speaking to the ranger the other year, he indicated that an average of 10,000 vehicles go through there a year, I wouldn't have thought it to be that many . Still when they say that about 3,000 go through the Rubicon trail in USA on any given weekend , makes you realise how bloody fortunate we are that we are not crossing guy ropes every where we camp
 

BUSHNUT

Well-Known Member
does anyone have gps waypoints of the camping areas you are talking about? I will be going through the Wonnangatta Valley in two weeks, so I'd be interested in everyone's version of the best place to camp :D[/QUOTE]

On Google Earth the GPS Points for where we usually camp are as follows

37 degrees 12'15.53"S and 146 degrees 49'39.35"E

, you will see a track off over an embankment from the main track on the Eastern side or river side, camp down on the lower part near the river as if it blows up bit it can be very breezy up on the paddock, you will see the long drop dunnies on the edge of the paddock .

There are plenty of camping spots up and down the valley but this is the area that has the long drop dunnies as far as I know ( I'll stand corrected )

Enjoy yourselves !
 
Wonnangatta Valley with a camper trailer

The considered Mecca for Victorian 4WD drivers, known for the tragic murders, the grave yard makes one appreciate how far from the outside world this place was in the early part of the last century.

Camping is free, there are a number of long drop dunnies . It is part of the National Alpine Park .

There are 3 ways into the Wonnangatta, from the Buffalo Valley there is Riley's track, from the Western there is the Zeka Spur track and from the southern end , Wombat Sput track which turns onto Hernes Spur track

Hope the pictures inspire you to make the journey.

Bushnut

Hi all,

the first way in you described via riley's track we used early this year. It's the easiest way into the valley if you're towing an off road camper. We really enjoyed Wonnangatta Valley and stayed there for 4 days before moving on to Talbotville. One note of caution: HF radio is best for Wonnangatta for UHF won't work & if you get rain, you'll have a much harder job getting out of the valley. Great spot though!

P.S. Dogs aren't allowed in National Parks and if you see something in my photo's that looks like a dog, it's not!, it's a RAT ON A STRING!!
 

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UncySpam

New Member
well we made it in and out ok... slow, with problems, but ok :D

We came in via Zeka Spur Track, which was fine, and left via Hernes Spur, which wasnt. We ended up having to turn the trailer by hand half way up Hernes and get it back down, then up via wombat spur with the trailer hooked to my patrol instead. I WOULDN'T recommend to anyone to try and tow a trailer through here - its stressful on the vehicle, and the driver :D

Found a great camp site, just over the river from the ruins, shaded in under some great big trees. Had the place to ourselves, and had a ball :D

I got perfect reception on my UHF - was talking to ppl 30+ k's away.
 
Hi UncySpam,

If you'd come in through Riley's track, you would have found the going much easier. Don't get me wrong, there are still some steep sections but in general, not too bad for a 4wd and camper trailer. We made our trip there in March this year. As far as the UHF radio goes, well, I also have a UHF but knowing that it's a good 3hr journey out of the valley wanted upto date information regarding any fires in the area. We made regular phone calls to our freinds in Melbourne just to make sure. Also kept in touch with the VKS 737 4wd network for regular weather information so that if rain was forecast, we'd leave early. I tried to contact the Pinnacles on UHF and no luck.. This is why I say HF is the way to go.. You minimize your risk.
 

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BUSHNUT

Well-Known Member
well we made it in and out ok... slow, with problems, but ok :D

We came in via Zeka Spur Track, which was fine, and left via Hernes Spur, which wasnt. We ended up having to turn the trailer by hand half way up Hernes and get it back down, then up via wombat spur with the trailer hooked to my patrol instead. I WOULDN'T recommend to anyone to try and tow a trailer through here - its stressful on the vehicle, and the driver :D

Found a great camp site, just over the river from the ruins, shaded in under some great big trees. Had the place to ourselves, and had a ball :D

I got perfect reception on my UHF - was talking to ppl 30+ k's away.

Didn't know you were hauling a trailer otherwise I would have advised you to go via Rileys from the Buffalo valley, the only bad patch was imediately the moment you crossed the Wonnangatta River when we were last in there earlier in the year ( bit of a hole ).

Never had much trouble with UHF in there so maybe Sandmans airial needs checking out , like you say range is about 30 KM's but as he says and it is true radio has always been to atmospheric conditions , the old 27 meg is still probably superior to UHF for in amongst those steep hills, quite a few people are starting to run the two, In the outback UHF is the best out of the two but HF does reign supreme out there- I have a SATPHONE for emergencies,I simply take the New Generation simcard ot og my normal mobile phone and put it in my Iridium Satphone and hey presto can talk to anyone in the world , someone in the party should have a HF radio or a Satphone out in these places just in case - Murphy's Law and all that !

I take my hat off to you for having a crack at Hernes Spur with a trailer, sounds like it must have been relatively dry, because it would have been down right dangerous in the wet if not impossible .

Unfortunately the modern maps are not as detailed as much as the old army ordanace maps , they would have given you a clearer picture of what to expect by the closeness of the contour lines .

But hey thats something to stretch out at the next campfire with !
 
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HF SSB vs UHF

Didn't know you were hauling a trailer otherwise I would have advised you to go via Rileys from the Buffalo valley, the only bad patch was imediately the moment you crossed the Wonnangatta River when we were last in there earlier in the year ( bit of a hole ).

Never had much trouble with UHF in there so maybe Sandmans airial needs checking out , like you say range is about 30 KM's but as he says and it is true radio has always been to atmospheric conditions , the old 27 meg is still probably superior to UHF for in amongst those steep hills, quite a few people are starting to run the two, In the outback UHF is the best out of the two but HF does reign supreme out there- I have a SATPHONE for emergencies,I simply take the New Generation simcard ot og my normal mobile phone and put it in my Iridium Satphone and hey presto can talk to anyone in the world , someone in the party should have a HF radio or a Satphone out in these places just in case - Murphy's Law and all that !

I take my hat off to you for having a crack at Hernes Spur with a trailer, sounds like it must have been relatively dry, because it would have been down right dangerous in the wet if not impossible .

Unfortunately the modern maps are not as detailed as much as the old army ordanace maps , they would have given you a clearer picture of what to expect by the closeness of the contour lines .

But hey thats something to stretch out at the next campfire with !

G'day BUSHNUT,

In regards to 27MHz HF radio, I'd Agree, the UHF set is much better but what I'm referring to is what I'm using which is a HF SSB 2 - 25MHz like the codan 8528, 9323 or NGT series system. There's no comparison to UHF and is cheaper than SAT phone if you know how to buy and setup.

High Frequency SSB Radio Using frequencies in the range of 2 to 25MHz, HF can offer reliable communications over thousands of kilometres. HF offers no cost communications between mobiles travelling anywhere in Australia as well as to base stations operated by the VKS-737 Radio Network. These base stations provide free information such as Weather Reports, Road Closures, Safety Logging, Message Handling and Telephone Calls.
Modern features such as Selcall allow subscribers to reliably make contact with other subscribers and bases around Australia, while some transceivers allow Direct Dial Radio-Telephone calls through suitably equipped bases.

Another use of HF radio is for making contact with the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) who can provide medical advice, treatment and emergency medical evacuation for travellers in the outback. VKS-737 subscribers have the option of making direct Selcall contact (via radio-telephone interconnect) with the RFDS via the VKS-737 bases at Adelaide, Alice Springs, Cairns, Charters Towers, Darwin, Derby, Newcastle, Perth, St Marys & Swan Hill.

HF radio can also provide entertainment in the form of broadcasting stations such as Radio Australia, BBC World Service, Radio Netherlands, Radio Zealand, Voice of America etc. as well as Weather Services, Time Signals etc.

There are presently four brands of type-approved HF radio equipment sold in Australia, the typical cost of new equipment is around $3400 for a radio with an automatic tuning antenna. Some manufacturers include a voucher for 12 months subscription to the VKS-737 Network in the price of a new radio package. Second-hand prices are dependant upon the age of the radio, the availability of spare parts, the number of channels fitted, the type of antenna (i.e. tapped whip or automatic tuning type) and whether the radio is fitted with Selcall etc. Subscription to the VKS-737 Radio Network includes the Licence Authority to use the VKS-737 frequencies.

There are other Netowrks out there other than VKS 737.. If anyone is interested in the VKS 737 Network then goto VKS737: The Australian HF Radio & Radio-Telephone Network !
 

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Willowna

Member
On a hot summers day a good spot to camp is at 'the horse paddock'.
Coming from Zeka continue past the homestead site, cross over Conglomorate Creek and it's directly to the right.
Fire pits throughout and long drop close by.
There used to be a walking bridge back over the creek towards the homestead but noticed it was gone on the last trip in.
 

Sambartom

Active Member
Hope you had a nice trip nut,Just wondering what type of "feral" Animals did you see if any..As im told its a top spot....;)
 

crapankles

New Member
Hi everybody, I am new to the web site and just wanted to say hello and ask my first question.
I am not new to 4wd having recently sold my 80 series.
could you tell me if my wifes 4wd ML320 would make it in to Wonnangatta Valley.

cheers
 

BUSHNUT

Well-Known Member
Clearence will be your major issue . Rileys track from the northern end ( Myrtleford , Buffalo valley ) is probably your best access , only hiccup will be at the river, not so much a depth problem but sometimes it get pretty chopped up on the opposite bank going in - check with parks for latest track conditions . Zeka and Hernes spur, wombat and cynthia range tracks will be beyond that vehicles capability .
 

crapankles

New Member
wonnangatta valley access/ml320

Thankyou for the reply and info BushNut, We may need to stick to the easy trails until another 4bie is purchased for myself.

Cheers Steve
 

1 red gu

4x4 Earth Contributer
hi guys just bringing back an old thread
looking for some info traveling out from wonnangatta station, is it possible to tow a trailer out through wombat range track to eaglevale then along wonnangatta rd and crooked river rd and then on to dargo

also where dose the crooked river track start and finish ( the one with the twenty odd river crossing ) would love to do this as a day trip while in the area.

one other thing which is a better spot to camp on the river wonnangatta station or eaglevale

cheers
 

brumbypt

Banned
i liked finding a remote spot in the wonny valley..

But it was very cold over night and in the morning, next night we were up out of the valley and there wasnt the dew in the morning..

but thats a small problem and to answer your question, I would prefer wonny valley.


Carry on...
 
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