Wild dogs

Bomber2012

Well-Known Member
Just got back from 3 days in the Bullumwaal area in Victoria , had a great trip except for one incident on our last night .
I was woken at 2am by a growling noise , I managed to find my torch and shone it out to see 4 wild dogs growling at a mate while he was in his swag snoring quiet loudly , they took off pretty quickly once I shone the torch on them and screamed at them but freaked me out to think dogs would come in that close .

Has anyone else had a run in with feral dogs ?
Let us know the details and where ?
 

peterfermtech

Well-Known Member
Our property is not that far from Bullumwaal and all I can say is after the fires there is not much wildlife so it doesn't surprise me if the wild dogs are getting a bit hungry and braver than usual. We've lost a few sheep over the last couple of months. One was to a pair of Eagles but others may have been to dogs.
The story makes the climb up the ladder to the RTT not so bad.
 

John U

Well-Known Member
Went to 7 mile (past Sheepyard flat) Tuesday last week. My son and I had the whole campground to ourselves. Checked 8 mile as well and it was completely empty. So it was quiet. Went to bed early and was woken by the best howl ever at about 10pm.

I don't think I've ever heard a wild dog howl in the bush. This howl was a singular howl. No responses. Guestimate it was 100 meters away. We were at the up stream end of the campground. I reckon it might've been upstream at the end of the river flats.

Got up and grabbed the axe handle out of the ute, zipped the fly up, and felt like I went straight back to sleep. 4 dogs would've been a problem.
 

Batts88

Well-Known Member
Not good that's pretty scary could have ended bad your mate wouldn't have much of a chance against 4 dogs might have to take baits or a rifle when you go camping.
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
Has anyone else had a run in with feral dogs ?
Let us know the details and where ?

Yes but it usually ends with them having a big hole in them derived from a 270 Winchester ;)

I could show you the details but don't think admin would appreciate the images.

Feral/wild dogs are all over the country in every state.
The most common form is the dingo hybrid but there are plenty of different domestic breeds out there as well, I see these as possibly being more dangerous as they can be much larger than the hybrids.



Unfortunately they usually take residents in national parks & crown land where recreational hunting is prohibited but some states allow state forests to be accessed, they come out of theirprotected areas at night & run rampant on nearby rural properties.

I know of farmers losing 50 head of sheep in just a couple of days from dog packs.

The feral cat problem easily outstrips the dog problem in severity, but of course they arent going to surround you in your swag at night :p

I really feel for our farmers seeing the things they have to deal with & if I can help them out in a small way by conducting feral pest control on their property then I feel like I have helped a little.
 
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Neddysmith

Well-Known Member
Ive seen and heard small packs of wild dogs up Big River State forest, but also seen some pretty big feral cats as well...
 

Rusty Panels

Well-Known Member
I have friends with sheep farms and they have also lost stock from dog attacks, often from neighbouring properties who think Fido is a good boy and safe at home. It is instinctive for them to chase sheep and unfortunately when they have mates with them it gets nasty. The wild dogs are a different story.
I watched an ABC doco on them a while back and they have even circled blokes on horseback on their properties. It may well have turned out worse for your mate if you hadn't been there.
 

stevemc181

Well-Known Member
A couple of years ago the Missus and I were heading out to Hanging Rock in Karlamilyi NP WA. For those not familiar with the area this is a very remote area and seldom travelled. We’d pushed through spinifex and shrubbery for hours and when we came across a clearing we set up camp for the night.

We were in the tent when at about midnight we were woken by what sounded like a very large dog growling a few metres from the tent. We couldn’t see out of the tent as we only had a lamp with us, I ended up yelling at this thing, which only served to make it angrier. Starting to get a bit worried as we had no weapons with us, I then clicked the vehicle remote to flash the indicators. This did the trick to scare it off, or so we thought.

A couple of hours later it came back, and trust me this thing wanted a piece of us or didn’t want us there. I clicked the remote again and it ran off. Only to return once again a couple of hours later. We weren’t game to leave the tent that night when we couldn’t see it. It sounded large and bloody angry, and we had decided if need be we’d fend it off with our backpacks and get into the car if we had to.

We didn’t sleep much that night and were thankful when the sun came up. We hastily packed our gear and got the hell out of there. This is the only time I’ve felt threatened in Australia in over 40 years of remote camping, and is the only time I felt the wish for a firearm. We may very well have been the first people this dog had ever seen giving the seldom used area we were in. I now make sure we’ve got either an axe or a sharp knife with us in the tent.
 

Colly18

Well-Known Member
Ahh,..memories... the security of a firearm is definitely something I miss. It became such a pain transferring licences, registratiion details and going to safety courses, as I changed states with work, I gave up my guns and licence years ago. :( Now, it is similarly difficult not being able to (legally) carry weapons interstate or into national parks, without considerable inconvenience getting approval from authorities, so no taking firearms on interstate holidays. So, I always have an axe, hammer or 'dingo donger' (nulla nulla) in the tent or next to the swag when camping. Fortunately, we haven't struck wild dogs (and don't wish to), but have had dingoes hanging around and (literally) walking over the swag in the middle of the night; camels walking through the camp a couple metres away from the swag; spooked donkeys rushing through camp next to the swag; and one angry brumby letting us know how upset he was that we laid the swag in the middle of a track he wanted to use (that was little scary!). How great is Australia!
 

Joe Fury

Well-Known Member
G'day Adventurers

Quite an interesting post Azza, though I am not in the eastern states and I don't know of the area you were in where your wild dog encounter happened, it is remarkably similar to an encounter with what might be pure breed Dingo's here in the western desert region well east of Newman.

Scenario was similar, sleeping in my swag but on a camp stretcher about 4 metres away from my offsider who was snoring his head off in his dome mozzie proof tent thing ~ 03:40 ish and I feel a good hard push under my back, this bloody large Gold Dingo was checking me out from under the camp stretcher, no biting no growling but slobber on the canvas under my arse, not sure what his motive was but once I figured out what was happening I reached for my miners pick which was at the head end of my stretcher, the dog bolted when I moved but I could see it quite clearly in the star light.

My off sider slept through it all, I knew he was alive because he just snored through it all.

Yes I carry a shot gun and it was loaded with 'buck shot' but that was in the cab of the Cruiser where it was nice and safe, my mate is licenced to carry/use a hand gun and that too was safe in the cruiser, not sure how things would have gone had we both had the firearms at the ready ~ possibly could have been like the shoot out at the 'OK Corral' and the Dingo would have had the last laugh anyway.

Safe travels : Joe Fury
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
Nothing quite so sinister here, but I woke up to a face full of dingo near where the Coulson track meets the French line. I don’t know who got the biggest fright haha. I have seen my family being selected by a group of dingos on Fraser. If they didn’t have a boat to escape there was going to be real trouble. I was stuck on the big boat making as much noise as I could.
 

rogerazz

4x4 Earth Contributer
G'day Adventurers

Quite an interesting post Azza, though I am not in the eastern states and I don't know of the area you were in where your wild dog encounter happened.

Safe travels : Joe Fury
That was Bomber2012 in Vic. High Country.
However I did have to sort out a couple of feral dogs who were spooking cattle up in the hills near Seymour and had brought down a joey. If I see anything feral, well that job has to be done. So many out there killing our native birds and animals.
 

peterfermtech

Well-Known Member
There are a few Aussie critters like brushies or koalas that make some godforsaken sounds. Especially if you're an 11 yo boy scout out on his first overnighter camping in a one man(child) cotton tent.
 

sharkcaver

Well-Known Member
There are a few Aussie critters like brushies or koalas that make some godforsaken sounds. Especially if you're an 11 yo boy scout out on his first overnighter camping in a one man(child) cotton tent.
Not to mention those damn drop bears...lol.

I guess I've been lucky. Heard many a dingo howl (some very close by) and watched their cunning antics around the camper at Dalhousie, but I've never had one come to close to me in my swag/camp (that I'm aware of anyway). Dingoes dont faze me too much, they dont like you being aggressive back at them, but the mongrel wild dog cant be trusted and has balls of steel. Hopefully I never have that encounter.
 

Swaggie

Moderator
We camped around that area a couple of years back, around 8 pm we were setting the swags (after a days driving) and they started howling, a quick shot in there direction stopped there shenanigans...
 

Andrew_LN65

Active Member
We saw this fuzzy little guy in Toolangi earlier this year. I was surprised to see one so close to the city, and so young. He wasn't fussed by us at all, we watched him for a good few mins before he wandered off into the scrub. We never saw mum but no doubt she saw us.
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RainmanWA

Member
Some years ago about 400kms south of Billiluna on the Canning Stock Route we camped in an open area and one of the blokes had to answer the call of nature in the middle of the night. He got out of his swag and was confronted by 4 dogs ferreting through the camp and they all started snarling at him and an all black individual was intent on challenging him. Despite his attempts to scare them off they all continued to behave aggressively so he slept the rest of the night in his vehicle and left the rest of us in our tents. :eek:
 

Bomber2012

Well-Known Member
There was a bounty on wild dogs down here in Vic quiet a few years ago (I think you had to scalp them to claim $15) but now the department lay 1080 baits to control them . Some farmers do get professional shooters in to cull them but it’s a shame the gov removed the bounty as 1080 doesn’t seem to be very effective.
 
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