When you recovered somone that probably didn't deserve your help.

Colly18

Well-Known Member
Sharkcaver prompted this :)
I'm sure we've all been in situations when we have recovered someone and wondered, "How did this person get into this situation?"; "Why is this person so unprepared?"; "Where's the thanks?"; or simply, "WTF, but I'll help out anyway because ..........?"
I thought it would be interesting to have your stories here in the one place. I've a few to tell so I'll start it off with this one (which may well be lurking elsewhere in the forum?);
This isn't even a 4WD tale! It's 1988 and we are doing our first trip around Oz (after I had finished uni and we sold our house to finance the trip on interest from investments. (Those were the days 15% plus interest rates! :)). We were travelling in a HZ Kingswood 253 V8 towing a 13X7 van and with one year old and two year old kids on board.
We had made it through WA and into Keep River N.P. on the NT side of the N.T.-W.A. border east of Kununurra. We made camp and later in the afternoon noticed a guy pull in on the opposite side of the campground in a Falcon station wagon, and soon bog himself in soft earth/sand. So I wandered over to see if could help. Yep, this guy was stuck and it was going to require a tow/tug to get him out. (Now, bear in mind my tow rope is equally buried in my boot somewhere) I say I'll give him a tow out and ask has he a tow rope? He responds that he has one but it is buried somewhere in the back behind his front seat (or words to that effect) and do I have one I can use? (This is where the situation becomes, "WTF, but I'll help out anyway because ..........?") So I unpack my vehicle, find my tow rope, and get him out of his bog.
I've no recollection of any thanks (but surely there must have been?) and there was definitely no, "here's a beer!" on offer. I mean, "Really!"
 

smitty_r51

Well-Known Member
Yorke peninsular.

Drive down to get a sunset photo and there are two old blokes bogged to the axles in a Delica where they have gone through the crust into the seaweed sand.

So we drive onto help them, but of a newbie error as we got bogged too.

Anyway, I walked back a couple of km to get reception and phoned the local pub to get help.

Walked back, the wife has dug our car out, shifted good knows how much sand and when the old lads tourned up to help it just popped out in low range.

The two guys who had got stuck and caused the issue... They just sat on the back of the van and drank beer...
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
I was minding my own business when this muppet decided it might be a good idea to drive across the tidal lagoon instead of around it. He went down in the deep section in the background. His mirrors were under. My winch was never the same and he just tore off back into the salt water.
5C3A3656-26EA-4AEA-A668-03EE683885F6.jpeg
 

Skurfer

Member
I try to help/recover as many people as I can in my travels including pulling over and helping people push their cars off the road if they have broken down and things like that in the hope that Karma is a thing and the time I get myself into some unintended mischief that I can't fix myself that the repayment comes fast and in full haha.
Has worked pretty well so far. A couple of times now I have been in some real remote spots on my own where an extra pair of hands would come in handy and some appear out of nowhere after not seeing a soul for days.
 

Code4

New Member
My B-I-L and I set up at Indian Head in Fraser in my old petrol 2002 V6 Rodeo twin cab (All analog, no electronics) with a snatch strap and extension strap. For an afternoon e recovered backpackers and city folk belonging to the 45psi rental crowd. It was good practice and initially amusing but the level of ignorance was quite frightening and a safety issue. Its not their fault, they just have no idea that off road requires a different mind set and knowledge base.
 

Swaggie

Moderator
The problem is i can’t and many others on here wouldnt look the other way and keep driving.
So you come across this scenario occasionally but most are grateful plus you feel great for helping out so generally a win win all around apart from when you break your own gear but that’s life.....
 

smwhiskey

Member
Mate pulled a bunch of backpackers out of a "creek" on Fraser once. They'd come down off one of the inland tracks, drove around some plastic orange temporary fencing put there to stop drivers hitting the deepest part of the crossing and then tried to drive through the deepest part of the crossing. They got 1/2 way. Completely drowned the 2WD petrol CRV.

Anyway, after a good laugh we towed them out of the water, emptied the water out of the air box and ECU, took the spark plugs out and tried to get the water out of the cylinders, sprayed a shedload of WD-40 everywhere but couldn't get it going again. Ended up letting them use one of our phones to call for a towie and then left them to it.

Saw it the next day at Eurong with the bonnet up tyrig to dry everything out
And then saw it again the day after that about 200m down the beach from Eurong. Again with the bonnet up. Obviously got that far before it died again.
Fraser Rescue.jpg
 

phs

Well-Known Member
We had an interesting situation many moons ago where we were bogged and happily hand winching out when An older Fellow leading a convoy of 5 or 6 4wds rolled up, no hello just “!you can stop now “.

Our return was all good we can get it out, he said I have an electric winch I’ll pull you out, seeing he was keen to impress his convoy we said ok and let him show his friends how you “ sort it out “

anyway after that we offered them a beer which they were not interested in said our thanks and they were on there way

Hours later down another track we were stuck again, now this was very normal for us it was like an hourly event and we had everything we needed to be self sufficient in solo recovery, we setup the winch off a tree a fair way down the track but could nt setup a line as the same guy from before and his convoy were stuffing around snatching over some minor washouts, we left our straps there next to the tree and waited at our 4wd for them to pass

Eventually he comes past window down “ sorry mate not helping you again “....... and we were like yeah cool just waiting for you guys to finish up so we can setup the winch,

he just drove off and just then over the radio we heard “ I just grabbed the straps “ alarm bells rang we jumped out and stopped them, sorry mate I think you have our gear, to which he questioned if it was ours anyway we grabbed it back and on they went, a few mins later another guy stopped and said did you want a quick snatch out the guy we just past stopped us and told us not to help you ???

We thought that was a bit rough any way hook the strap on .....

So I guess this guy thought we didn’t deserve his help even though we never actually wanted it and then nearly left us high and dry taking our recovery gear by mistake
 
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Lost1?

Active Member
Around 2015 I was fishing on the beach near 42 mile crossing for a couple of days. The number of people that didn't have adequate recovery gear or much of an idea on a beach that is notoriously soft was astounding.

One bloke had got brand new V6 Pathfinder on the beach some how and couldn't climb the dune to get off the beach. I wasn't game to hook a strap on the front in case I tore something off. I dropped his tyre pressures and told him to drive no faster than 40km/he to salt creek and pump his tyres up when he hit the road.

I think people see the adds and think I will buy that car and do that without any understanding of what is required.
 

McGinnis

Active Member
Quite a few years ago I was exploring somewhere down the south coast (don't even remember where, but it was around Jervis) with a mate, both of us in troopies. We came across a couple of guys walking out in the middle of the bush who said they were stuck.

We picked them up to drive them back to their vehicle, which was stuck attempting to drive around a locked gate.

We figured we'd pull them out the way they'd come to at least get them out of there before they did more damage. As we were winching them out, another 4wd arrived and the driver started taking photos and video of what we were doing. The driver was furious, and she started screaming at everyone. We finished the winching and I tried to explain to her we were not associated with the dropkicks trying to get around the locked gate. As it turns out she's a resident and the gates often get vandalised, pulled down etc. and the roads are used as an emergency fire escape route.

She calmed down eventually when she decided we were telling the truth. The whole place burned out last year; hopefully the tracks were usable for evac.
 
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Patriot

Administrator
I've seen a few people completely lost. Once the phone signal goes and they can't get Google Maps up, it is all over red rover. They are never prepared for an extended stay. Makes me wonder how many people have an overnight stay they weren't planning on because they don't have a decent map with them.
 

Toyasaurus

Active Member
Years ago we were down in one of the boggy valleys in the Watagans, about 5pm heading back up to go home.
We came across this muppet in a pajero with road tyres on it stuck fast in a bog hole.
The temp was down to about 10deg and dropping, this guy had 3 kids with him all under 10, no kit and no clue.
He asked us to drop him up to get a tow, i said none of us have kids seats in the trucks, no worries they can stay here.
I told him it would be pitch black and very cold by the time he got back, he say`s should only be 10min or so.
I told him it takes 45m just to get to the main rd, then you have to find a town then arrange a tow, do you know where you are, HUH.
It took us about 10m to get him out, we said follow the leed truck up the track, if you get into more trouble we can sort it out.
The leed truck pulls away and this dipstick is sitting up his ass in high range.
More explaining of the ways of 4wd, get him into low and easy drive out, then he followed us out to the main rd.
We stopped to air up this clown blows straight past, no thanks, no nothing.
Mate say`s to me next time some prick is stuck we`ll just call the cops, let them deal with it.

The saddest thing is that we used to play in the Watagans all the time, I don`t mind helping out but so many idiot`s didn`t even have recovery gear.
I got sick of replacing snatch straps, I always bought Ol gear at the time it was about $130 a strap.
Got to the point that if some one got into trouble and didn`t have their own kit, it was a case of sorry can`t help unless you pay for the broken kit.

Hope I`ve built up a good supply of karma.
 

Patriot

Administrator
Years ago we were down in one of the boggy valleys in the Watagans, about 5pm heading back up to go home.
We came across this muppet in a pajero with road tyres on it stuck fast in a bog hole.
The temp was down to about 10deg and dropping, this guy had 3 kids with him all under 10, no kit and no clue.
He asked us to drop him up to get a tow, i said none of us have kids seats in the trucks, no worries they can stay here.
I told him it would be pitch black and very cold by the time he got back, he say`s should only be 10min or so.
I told him it takes 45m just to get to the main rd, then you have to find a town then arrange a tow, do you know where you are, HUH.
It took us about 10m to get him out, we said follow the leed truck up the track, if you get into more trouble we can sort it out.
The leed truck pulls away and this dipstick is sitting up his ass in high range.
More explaining of the ways of 4wd, get him into low and easy drive out, then he followed us out to the main rd.
We stopped to air up this clown blows straight past, no thanks, no nothing.
Mate say`s to me next time some prick is stuck we`ll just call the cops, let them deal with it.

The saddest thing is that we used to play in the Watagans all the time, I don`t mind helping out but so many idiot`s didn`t even have recovery gear.
I got sick of replacing snatch straps, I always bought Ol gear at the time it was about $130 a strap.
Got to the point that if some one got into trouble and didn`t have their own kit, it was a case of sorry can`t help unless you pay for the broken kit.

Hope I`ve built up a good supply of karma.
Being someone who has had to rely on the kindness of strangers in my earlier years, I definitely think there is benefit in helping out, but some people do ask a lot, especially when there is equipment damage, vehicle damage, or even injuries.
 

Toyasaurus

Active Member
I think now days I would be more likely to help out, I have a lot more patents these days, besides I like teaching.
Cost isn`t so much of an issue these days.

Of course you have to be out there to help.
I haven`t been off road for about 3yrs.
 
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