What's your approach to camping? Minimalist or not?

boobook

Well-Known Member
I know a bloke who’s camping gear is all colour coded , wont buy it unless it’s navy blue . He also takes all the shit in the world away with him , takes 4 hrs to set up camp then spends 2-3 hrs preparing dinner .

Good idea. I used to go camping with a family that bought cheap crappy chairs. Guess what, every time I went to sit down at the camp fire their chairs were empty and the good ones I got for our family all taken. Didn't matter how many times I asked them to move, next time was the same.

What cheeses me off.
 

Bomber2012

Well-Known Member
Good idea. I used to go camping with a family that bought cheap crappy chairs. Guess what, every time I went to sit down at the camp fire their chairs were empty and the good ones I got for our family all taken. Didn't matter how many times I asked them to move, next time was the same.

What cheeses me off.
You do meet some interesting people camping , I'm sure everyone has camped with the bloke that every bit of gear he owns is the best (in his eyes) and everything else is garbage .
 

Rusty Panels

Well-Known Member
Definitely minimalist! No 5 star rating for me 4 will do!

My young bloke went through a stage of extreme camping crap. Parachute cord wound around everything (just in case). Water purifying tablets, Hexamine tablet stove (ideal for a spider or cicada roast dinner) and even rat traps in case there were any tasty rodents wandering the camp at night. Problem was though that he was too tied to his gameboy and X-box to ever get of his arse and actually go camping. :rolleyes:
 
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CTL

Well-Known Member
I know a bloke who’s camping gear is all colour coded , wont buy it unless it’s navy blue . He also takes all the shit in the world away with him , takes 4 hrs to set up camp then spends 2-3 hrs preparing dinner .
I think I know that guy :D:D:D
 

fazz

Active Member
Id say my approach is semi-minimalist
Carry everything i need but no more, setup/packup cant be more than 10minutes (roll out swag, unpack chair)
but i still have lots of stuff, it just all has its spot in my canopy and is ready to go.
Do you have a link to a photo champion?
 

Laingy

Member
Lots of great thoughts here guys, so I'll add mine!

I also spent some decades wearing shiny black feet and baggy green skin and marching up and down the parade ground! The Army says you have to take your weapon, ammo and sometimes a 10 kilo radio and spare batteries. As well as that you have to carry grenades, smoke flares, extra ammo for the section machine gun, and maps and such. Whatever room is left in your pack and webbing is taken up with food and water. Not much left for luxuries!!
Now after the Army it's different!
The bigger your vehicle the more stuff you can take, and if you can afford it, you take it!
The missus and I both started our lives in the Army so we now appreciate the luxuries too. We had an off road camper trailer but it took too much time to set up and take down, so we graduated to a pop top caravan. Our extras are solar panels, double batteries, spare water tanks and a/c for the hot nights. The 4 x 4 carries tables, chairs, fridges, generator, fishing gear, dunny, shower tent etc. We take 15 minutes to set up and can take down in 10, so we're really loving it, especially free camping where we can have a small fire. We also take about 60 kgs of red and blue gum when we go and use a small washing machine drum as our fire pit. The 60 kgs lasts about 4 - 5 nights as long as we aren't trying to signal the International Space Station!
Minimalist is great for bush walkers and beasts of burden, but we've been there and carried that, so now we're creatures of luxury out in the bush!

Stay safe

Laingy
 

Lost1?

Well-Known Member
I think I am just above minimalist. Set up takes 15 minutes tops. Morning routine including packing up is 45 minutes after I drag myself off my self inflating mattress. 75 L fridge, 55L water tank, plastic storage tubs, 2 burner cooker and a single burner stove. 1 tub for utensils pots cups etc. Kmart 3 man tent or a canvas swag on a stretcher. Depends if I am in a humid or cool climate. Or if it looks like rain.

Coffee plunger and bottles of red if in winter or beer in summer are my concession to luxury. Maybe a sneaky icecream in summer on a beach. Dual zone fridge was the smartest thing I purchased.
 

typhoeus

Well-Known Member
As you get older, the requirements change . . A lot. I was very minimalist when young and single, you know the old saying " a rolling stone gathers no moss" but when you stop rolling (as you do when wife & kids happen) you start gathering moss. Kids are gone but wife is still around, she has old injuries, rules out sleeping on the ground, and me, well, its sometimes a long way up to get on my feet. And then there is the " conveniences". Missus won't go where there is no toilet, and midnight pees are becoming more necessary for me too, so, simple camping is not so simple these days, I'm on the lookout for a pop top type van now. Leave the minimalist approach to the young fellers.
 

Laingy

Member
As you get older, the requirements change . . A lot. I was very minimalist when young and single, you know the old saying " a rolling stone gathers no moss" but when you stop rolling (as you do when wife & kids happen) you start gathering moss. Kids are gone but wife is still around, she has old injuries, rules out sleeping on the ground, and me, well, its sometimes a long way up to get on my feet. And then there is the " conveniences". Missus won't go where there is no toilet, and midnight pees are becoming more necessary for me too, so, simple camping is not so simple these days, I'm on the lookout for a pop top type van now. Leave the minimalist approach to the young fellers.
No one is getting younger mate, and I think our wives might be sisters :)
 

LongRoad2Go

Well-Known Member
After years of carrying everything in a rucksack, a 4WD is luxury enough.

Though age has wearied me to accept a fridge/freezer and gas cooker, swapping out dried food, fuel stove, and hard spirits for cold beer and gourmet meals ... though the hard spirits still make a regular appearance in winter. Continue to retain the tent and camp fire though, no rooftop … that’s too much luxury, don’t wanna get soft!

What’s that saying about wives: once they turn 40, trade them in on two 20 year olds?;)
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
I still like both, last week with the better half at Corowa and Sheepyard in the van with all the luxury of home, tonight head off to Walhalla to do some tracks with some mates with the old 4by and minimal gear
Best of both worlds
 
A mate and I were just talking about how we used to pack 3 blokes into a 10 foot tinny with enough gear for half a week and still get it up on the plane, now two of us manage to fill the whole back of a cruiser for just two nights in the bush.

I've found there's the same baseline amount of gear that you need for two days or two weeks - mostly shelter, clothes, cookware and fridge. The only thing that changes is food and water (and fuel depending on the trip). 95% of our trips are fishing trips which also means two kayaks on the roof, 5-10 rods inside and half a tackle store in the back.

I've been trying to cut gear down as much as possible but there's a lot of "just in case" stuff included that I don't like leaving behind. I don't tow a van or camper and shelter consists of a swag and big tarp running off the roof racks ( and I really only bother with the tarp if there's a chance of rain). We're generally only in one spot for one or two nights max so spending half a day setting up and pulling down doesn't make much sense. I think a lot of travellers would consider that setup 'minimalist' even though I've convinced myself I'm dragging far too much junk around.
 

stevemc181

Well-Known Member
I’m guilty of carrying way too many tools and bits and pieces, but every time I go through the tool kit to remove things, I just can’t do it. We like getting to the more remote places and are usually travelling solo, hence taking a bit more gear in case of issues. If going really remote the full tire repair kit goes with us. The weight soon adds up with levers/bead breaker etc.

Don’t get me started on tent pegs! I carry them for a variety of terrain and have way too many.

I really need to go through all the gear again and ditch what I never use ;)

As mentioned in an above post, there isn’t any difference in what we take for a short or a long trip, just the amount of food and water varies.

Our style of camping is generally being on the move each day, so we’ve got setup and pack up down to around 20 minutes, unless we’ve set up the full shower and associated gear every few days.

A bit of comfort is welcome as your bones get older, but it can get tiring doing the setup/pack up everyday. It’s a never ending quest to find the perfect balance.
I really hate towing anything, but can see the day approaching where we transition to a T-Van or similar.
 
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