Weight on Roof

patrick_d

New Member
Is the weight limit for a moving vehicle only? I want to put a rooftop tent on which weighs 53kg. With 2 people with a combined weight of 170kg puts it over the limit. Where as my moving load will be no more than 60kg once solar panel and maxtrax etc are ontop of that

Going a little over is probably okay. You can almost certainly put more weight on your roof and drive around. But keep in mind that more weight up top will greatly increase the center of gravity. And your chances of rollover (proofs here).
I wouldn’t go more over long distances. Not worth the risk because you never know when you need to make a quick maneuver.
 
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mikehzz

Well-Known Member
Going a little over is probably okay. You can almost certainly put more weight on your roof and drive around. But keep in mind that more weight up top will greatly increase the center of gravity. And your chances of rollover.
I wouldn’t go more over long distances. Not worth the risk because you never know when you need to make a quick maneuver.
Because you never have to swerve or slam your brakes on when you're driving to the supermarket? Nope, never done that, I keep my heavy braking and swerves to long trips only.
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
But keep in mind that more weight up top will greatly increase the center of gravity. And your chances of rollover.
I think you mean the reverse, it would decrease your centre of mass because it is higher than the vehicles "centre of gravity"

I wouldnt disagree that having 200kg of extra weight on your roof you would have the take that into account while driving, if you go around a corner to fast it would definately assist in pulling the top over.

Pretty much how truck roll over
 

CaptainBanana

Well-Known Member
The question is how are they mounted, are they mounted with nutserts or mounted with a plate from underneath or are they mounted to some other such factory fixing?
 

megamung

Active Member
I did 1000's of K's of corrugations over eight years and never had a problem, but I always packed the heavy stuff in the tray and light but bulky on the roof, that said in the pic I would easily had over 100kg and this was typical for most of my trips away.

on this trip (2014) I met a young guy in Seisia with a 90's Surf. the whole rear section of his roof had collapsed under the weight of his rack, the rear doors would not open, looked very nasty and was a write off for sure.
IMG_4816.JPG
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
I always have something on the roof. Usually it is fine, and I have not had a whole rack come adrift.
Be wary of loading up styleside ute canopies too much. The well body side themselves try to march apart and end up splitting in some cases. The pic below was in 2009 when that ute was 1 year old. The RTT on the tradesmans racks (internally braced) caused the tray to split. If you are planning on doing countless kms of corrugations, a simple ratchet strap done up across the top rear of the tray (theres usually tie down loops there to use) before you close the tailgate will provide all the extra bracing required - if only I knew prior...
Desert Trip 552.jpg
 

Hoyks

Well-Known Member
I always have something on the roof. Usually it is fine, and I have not had a whole rack come adrift.
Be wary of loading up styleside ute canopies too much.

The 2012 vintage Ford Rangers were bad for for it. They had gone with a thinner, high tensile sheet metal for the body to add stiffness and save weight. Early on they had a bad run with the tubs cracking from a bit of off road work and just the weight of a canopy on them.

Corrugations and vibrations in are bad for anything. I was talking with an engineer who was working with avionics components and they were having to pot these bits in resin as if allowed to vibrate on the circuit board they were experiencing 700 G's, which isn't conducive to a long life.
It wouldn't be beyond the realms of possibility that a 50kg something on the rack could be exerting the equivalent of 150-200kg on the mounts as it jerks around in transit.
Pretty poor support from Rhino too. 3kg over our poorly communicated limit? Your on your own son.
 
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CaptainBanana

Well-Known Member
Very interesting. Rhino Rack sales will plummet. And they should.

Major Screwup.

Like I said you can't use a 3 or 4 mm pop-rivets put in by some peanut with a hand-held pop rivet gun and not expect metal fatigue to allow those to rip out. I own a Gesipa pro gun and still wouldn't expect tiny little 8mm rivets to hold a roof rack to roof skin because fatigue is still an issue.


This is why I went over kill and built a roof rack with massive steel plates fixed from beneath.
 

Karl Fehlauer

Well-Known Member
Is the weight limit for a moving vehicle only? I want to put a rooftop tent on which weighs 53kg. With 2 people with a combined weight of 170kg puts it over the limit. Where as my moving load will be no more than 60kg once solar panel and maxtrax etc are ontop of that

Wouldn't be easier to ask Ford what the weight is, as well as the manufacturer of your rack - at least they are obliged to give you the correct answers rather than conjecture from people here. Also, get it in writing should anything happen in the future.

Karl
 

idiomatically

Well-Known Member
Is the weight limit for a moving vehicle only? I want to put a rooftop tent on which weighs 53kg. With 2 people with a combined weight of 170kg puts it over the limit. Where as my moving load will be no more than 60kg once solar panel and maxtrax etc are ontop of that

Ford state that PX-PX3 (so your 2013) Ranger XLT has a roof load rating of 80kg, they do not publish a static vs dynamic load rating. That is all the weight you are allowed to put up there.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
I thought he fessed up to a mistake at the price of majorly pissing off an influential company that would be off their tree about the episode.

I think the guy is genuine, informative and entertaining. There might be lots of crap he tests on his vehicle that we never see.

It took balls to make that video IMHO.
 
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