Tyres in soft sand

Mark Stone

New Member
Hi there new to the site and need help with I’m sure a common problem
I have a ranger with 265/60/18 and want to beef them up to 285/60/18 but was told by one guy that I could have trouble popping a bead if running low pressure on soft sand. Any advice would be great
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
If anything the taller sidewalls will help prevent that and allow lower pressures. Though the larger tyres will rob some economy and power.

Generally, if you turn slowly on the sand, you should have no issues above about 8 to 10 PSI.
 

mikehzz

Well-Known Member
265/70/18 will give you a free 1" lift and probably be better on sand due to the taller sidewall as @boobook said. It's the length of the footprint that counts not the width. The width increase is actually worse as there's more resistance. I've done 1.6 billion kms on sand at the 10-15psi range and never rolled a tyre off the bead. If you don't do any stupid hooning on sand then you don't have as much trouble.
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
I’ve popped a few beads In sand. Not hard when loaded up and towing in low range. I am guessing your mate might have been talking about you tyre width vs rim width. 60% aspect 285’s fit best on an 8.5” rim - there is movement either way but that is for the most stable fit. I don’t know what rims you have. As above, a higher aspect 265 tyre is going to do better for you in sand than a 285/60.
 

typhoeus

Well-Known Member
The OP asked about 265/60/18 vs 285/60/18

Of those two, the 285/60/18 is the better sand alternative with taller sidewalls.
Doesnt to "60" part of the specs indicate sidewall height? If thats the case then the only difference is the width of the tread . . 265 mm verses 285 mm. or have I got that wrong?
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
Doesnt to "60" part of the specs indicate sidewall height? If thats the case then the only difference is the width of the tread . . 265 mm verses 285 mm. or have I got that wrong?

The 60 relates to % ( 60 percent in this case) of the width so a wider tyre (285) will give you more sidewall height
I agree with what @boobook said but likewise what @mikehzz said is another and perhaps better alternative for sand
I have run 285/75 tyres on 8 inch rims for 300,000 k without issue
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
The wider the tire is the more resistance it creates at the front of the tire, the length is what gives flotation not width and the length between a 285 verse a 265 difference when deflated is about 5 mm but the extra 20 mm to create a wall of sand is significant
Next time anyone is playing in a sandpit or at the beach push your hand through the sand while it is in it side, then push it through with your wrist down toward the sand.
Or if you dont believe me there are multiple 4wd "experts" who have done the whole wide verses narrow with high and low pressures video clips where they prove the point with ink , the tread pattern does not lie when in black and white
 

Lost1?

Well-Known Member
Not the question you asked, but a response that provides options.
265/70r17 would be optimal. If you don't want to change rims then 265/65r18 would be next best. Like.others have said, the extra width is not always desirable.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
I have run 265 70 17 and 285 65 17 across sand many times each, and can't see any real difference.

But...

1)Tough sidewalls are better than soft ones. I had Mickey Thompsons ( in 265). They had soft sidewalls and bagged out sideways even at 22 PSI where they looked like they were at 16PSI. They were a puncture magnet. Tough sidewalls mean longer spread and less bagging. Never again. Expensive crap that wore out quickly too.
2)You can't do armchair comparisons. For example the tread width on 285 wide BFG's is about the same as other brands 265 width.
3)when people talk about the length vs width for low tyre pressure ,they forget those comparisons are for the same tyre and load. It has nothing to do with comparing different width tyres.
4)Tyres don't push through sand, they ride up over a crest, like continuously driving uphill. Lower pressure = more float = less crest. Fat or thin. Same same.
5)Mick Hutton, the tyre Nazi from Beadell tours told me that width doesn't make any difference in his experience - and he logs every tyre on every vehicle on every trip. BUT he says you are less likely to get spiked with thinner tyres on mulga spikes etc. He studies this stuff all the time, and his opinion is good enough for me.

I do have one set of tyres and wheels purely for sand desert trips. When buying the tyres I generally get 265 70 17. Not because of fat vs thin, but because they are more readily available than 285 65 17 in the outback and are $50 cheaper per corner for the same brand and model. I usually get Toyo's these days. In fact in his very thorough study of Tyre footprint, he doesn't even address Fat vs thin he just thinks you need to get Bias not radial tyres full stop.


Search back in Earth. this has been discussed dozens of times with the same arguments from the same people over the least 10 years or more. Not one thread that I can see has shown any proof one way or another. I can't even find anything on youtube or the 'google machine' on someone that has done tests. Just lots of opinions. If there is some youtube with a proper comparison on sand it would be interesting to see.

Interestingly a few Middle East forums I saw lean to wide tyres. ???

BTW 265 70 17 and 285 65 17 have the same sidewall height and overall diameter.
 
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boobook

Well-Known Member
Doesnt to "60" part of the specs indicate sidewall height? If thats the case then the only difference is the width of the tread . . 265 mm verses 285 mm. or have I got that wrong?
As others have said that is a ratio not the height per se.

For example a 285 65 17 tyre has 17mm taller sidewalls than a 225 75 17 tyre. ( 185mm vs only 168mm)

Ie as others have pointed out, the "60" part is meaningless without knowing the width.
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
And because of case pressure theory, the higher volume (internal surface area no matter what shape) tyre will carry the same given weight at less pressure and will give better performance in sand - but that is a whole other set of parameters and might be a chat for another day haha.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
Thank you for all the information really appreciate everyone that answered
Welcome to the forum mate. It is good to see a new member that follows up on the thread. Many new members ask a question and are never seen again. It is a great forum, though often hard to get an answer that specifically relates to your question LOL.
 
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