Tyre pressure monitors

Grinbot

Member
I've been considering getting a TPMS, and that DigOptions Solar Power TPMS (TP-15) unit looks like one of the best options I've come across - thanks! I like that spare sensors are easily available too.

It's interesting that it doesn't have locking nuts for the external sensors as other units do - but I don't like the idea of faffing around with locking nuts anyway.

But how about the issue of valve stem failure with external sensors: https://www.caravanersforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=70391&sid=cf7481771278e3772d511a1aab62127f

Not worth worrying about? Maybe just carry some spare valve stems I guess?
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
Grinbot. I had one like in the thread you posted. The sensors are bigger than the Digioptions ones that I swapped to. They used to hit the rim like in that pic, but in 10 years or so I have never had a stem issue. Now I have the Digi options TP15 because the old one only went down to 16 PSI. The smaller lighter sensors don't hit.

1)It has smaller and lighter sensors. No issues.
3)It alarms down to 2 PSI for sand etc.
3)It will work with 7 sensors, 4 plus spare plus 2 in the trailer. If the trailer is nearby it automatically goes into 6 wheel mode, then back to 5 wheel mode when there is no trailer.

The unit will accept additional sensors. I bought 2 x 4 wheel systems to suit my 4_2 trailer set up. For not much more, I got 2 displays and 8 sensors instead of 6
 
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Grinbot

Member
Awesome, thanks Boobook - really appreciate your advice.

Smaller and lighter sensors is another big tick for the Digoptions!
 

peterjj

New Member
How accurate do people find their sensors? I read they can be out by +/- 2psi. So with all tyres at actual 32psi one could show 30psi and another 34psi which would be disconcerting. Or am i wrong?
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
How accurate do people find their sensors? I read they can be out by +/- 2psi. So with all tyres at actual 32psi one could show 30psi and another 34psi which would be disconcerting. Or am i wrong?

First thing is are you sure they are all at 32psi ? If you are doing it from the roadside they will vary and the first one you inflated will of changed by the time you did the last as you are adding different temperature air and the tyre carcass is cooling down or another heating up in the sun. Also one tyre can run hotter than the others if the vehicle is loaded more in that corner so will read higher as a result
The only way to check accurately is to check you pressure ms when car is cold with a quality gauge
Just driving in the afternoon sun you will see the tyre pressure and temp rise on the sunny side of the car

Regardless of all of that the actual pressure reading is not the critical aspect, what you are watching for is a change from your baseline which will alert you to a slow leak/ puncture that you can deal with before destroying a tyre
Since running TPMS I have never actually had to change a tyre roadside as I have been able to plug and reinflate on the vehicle before we get to damage stage
 

CTL

Well-Known Member
Excellent reply @Albynsw
Before a big trip, I try to inflate in the shade and use a calibrated (or at least when purchased) tyre gauge. Still get one or two tyres out of six at 1 psi different to the others according to the TPMS. But as Alby said, that is not the point of fitting TPMS.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
How accurate do people find their sensors? I read they can be out by +/- 2psi. So with all tyres at actual 32psi one could show 30psi and another 34psi which would be disconcerting. Or am i wrong?

Like CTL, I have a digital Jamec Pem gauge. It is individually calibrated with an accuracy certificate. That and the TPMS always seem to be within 1 PSI for me.
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
How do you go with people thieving them or do you just fit them when actually on trips?

Ive always thought they were just "a thing to have" like many things 4x4 but I guess they are a good safety feature?
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
How do you go with people thieving them or do you just fit them when actually on trips?

Ive always thought they were just "a thing to have" like many things 4x4 but I guess they are a good safety feature?

I haven’t lost a sender in the last 11 years of using them.
I wouldn’t go on a trip without them, I only carry one spare these days as they give me the confidence that I am unlikely to lose a tyre Unless it is unfixable
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
I haven’t lost a sender in the last 11 years of using them.
I wouldn’t go on a trip without them, I only carry one spare these days as they give me the confidence that I am unlikely to lose a tyre Unless it is unfixable
Same. I park my car in the street too.
 

rob_macca67

Well-Known Member

boobook

Well-Known Member
What have people found to be better/easier to see in the Daylight & night Times... LCD or the LED displayed versions?

I only have the LCD versions Rob. But it has a backlight that turns on automatically at night. I think it know because of the solar cell charger inside it.

It works well for me.
 

CTL

Well-Known Member
I used to have my TPMS monitor mounted in a position that I could see it. Was a bit distracting actually but it was interesting to watch how the tyres changed with different conditions. After changing vehicles, I now just have it in the centre console and rely solely on the alarms and a bit of a check every now and then, mainly when I pull up for a reason. Less of a distraction
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
I used to have my TPMS monitor mounted in a position that I could see it. Was a bit distracting actually but it was interesting to watch how the tyres changed with different conditions. After changing vehicles, I now just have it in the centre console and rely solely on the alarms and a bit of a check every now and then, mainly when I pull up for a reason. Less of a distraction

Yes agreed. I had the bigger one and while it was good, it was just more clutter. The smaller solar one just sits on a flat part above the steering wheel and out of the way. All you really need is the beeps and an occasional visual check.
 

Grinbot

Member
My Masten TP-15 TPMS from https://www.digoptions.com.au/ arrived today and so far it seems really good. I really like the small, simple, LCD-screened reader unit -- blue blacklight when all is good, red when it is alarming. Alarm is decently loud.

I tried it with a single sensor attached and it worked straight away and was spot-on accurate at 36 C.

Each sensor comes with a locking nut and a rubber dust cover thing (I presume it is a dust cover).

I understand that the locking nut is not really necessary (that seems to be a popular opinion at least), but how about the dust cover?

I can't see how the dust cover helps as the thread that mates to the valve is going to seal anyway!? Also, it is pain to use because it turns into a mini balloon when you try to attach or detach the sensor from the tyre valve.

What do you reckon, dust covers - waste of time?

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Chatty

Well-Known Member
My Masten TP-15 TPMS from https://www.digoptions.com.au/ arrived today and so far it seems really good. I really like the small, simple, LCD-screened reader unit -- blue blacklight when all is good, red when it is alarming. Alarm is decently loud.

I tried it with a single sensor attached and it worked straight away and was spot-on accurate at 36 C.

Each sensor comes with a locking nut and a rubber dust cover thing (I presume it is a dust cover).

I understand that the locking nut is not really necessary (that seems to be a popular opinion at least), but how about the dust cover?

I can't see how the dust cover helps as the thread that mates to the valve is going to seal anyway!? Also, it is pain to use because it turns into a mini balloon when you try to attach or detach the sensor from the tyre valve.

What do you reckon, dust covers - waste of time?

View attachment 72278 View attachment 72279 View attachment 72280
I think it's more a water cover, rather than dust.
But either can get through the body of the sensor, not the valve stem.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
I think it may be a rim protector. If they are close to the rim they may hit.

My ones don't but I suspect f they were really close to the metal they would. The old ones I had which were larger did hit and chip the alloy coating.
 

Grinbot

Member
I think it's more a water cover, rather than dust.
But either can get through the body of the sensor, not the valve stem.

Yeh, I think you may be right with that one. However, there is an internal o-ring also doing that job, so my guess is that rubber boot is a fail safe - perhaps a bit of rim protection too.

The manual makes no mention of the rubber boot, by the way.

I'm not going to use it anyway - too cumbersome.

Thanks guys
 
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