To Re-condition Rear Diff or To Not Re-Condition Rear Diff

#22
any recommendations on best brands for diff lockers? I've heard those say to avoid ARB air lockers but then are they popular for a reason?
 
#23
any recommendations on best brands for diff lockers? I've heard those say to avoid ARB air lockers but then are they popular for a reason?
If you want locker don’t overlook the TJM Prolocker its similar to the ARB locker but very little issues.

A few have installed the Eaton Ellocker , there electrical.

I remember seeing a member have auto lockers front and rear on a Hilux around your year a fewYears back now and it was kicking ass up in the clay stuff so it would have done very well in the steep rocky shaley tracks and it would be the cheapest option.
 

typhoeus

Well-Known Member
#24
most places have exchange units, so you can order one, when it arrives, swap it ou and then send yours back to them, so your car is not off the road for long. diffs for 90s hilux are quite common at wreckers so if you went down that path, you should be able to get one. i guess it comes down to prices there in SA in the end
 

2002GU3

Well-Known Member
#25
any recommendations on best brands for diff lockers? I've heard those say to avoid ARB air lockers but then are they popular for a reason?
For the rear diff I'd choose the EATON E LOCKER, that way you have full control when to lock or unlock it.... the ARB air lockers have been known to blow seals/hoses and when they do your lockers will no longer work (don't know if they've improved any in later versions) also you need a compressor to get them to work.... E LOCKERS only have a couple of wires.... from what I've heard about auto lokkas, they are great in the front but not so good for the rear (maybe someone who has them can tell you more about how good / bad they are)
 

rogerazz

4x4 Earth Contributer
#27
Have had an Eaton E locker in the rear of the old Troopy for a few years now. Easy to use and has never given any trouble.
Also an older ARB Air Locker in front and the compressor is handy. No trouble either, I guess it may depend on how often and how hard you work them. I run them around once a month and even just to keep them working I take it off road for a run ( like today) and give the winch a run as well.
 

Hoyks

Well-Known Member
#29
ARB Air locker used to be the Go-To, but they aren't cheap and you need a compressor as well (the compressor being a bonus or just another mode of failure is a whole different argument to have) and if they start leaking air they aren't an easy fix.

I like my (factory) electric locker, comes on at the push of a button and wires are easy to fix.
 
#31
Thank you all so much for your comments, it has given a lot more insight into this. Would you all say that changing the wheel bearings should be included in a standard reconditioning? This is probably a 'duh' question!!!
 
#33
that's what I thought!! However my mech says 'would you like this extra thing - $220 on top'. Don't have much more of an option other than to just go with it although have questioned why would you say it's a separate item!!!
 

typhoeus

Well-Known Member
#34
that's what I thought!! However my mech says 'would you like this extra thing - $220 on top'. Don't have much more of an option other than to just go with it although have questioned why would you say it's a separate item!!!
Wheel bearings are a separate item , installed on the end of the axle nearest the wheel. it is highly likely they are as original as the diff bearings and as such very worn. If they fail, metal particles will find there way into your nice new diff, with predicable results. So. . Consider the $220 as insurance that all parts that can wear out in the diff assembly are replaced, and good for another 300k. You may find that the rear brake shoes and drums might need doing too, altho if they fail, it wont destroy the diff ( but no brakes is BAD :) )
I know, Ive done this job on my hilux not so long ago

https://4x4earth.com/forum/index.php?threads/guess-im-gonna-need-a-new-diff.44091/#post-587189
 
#35
Thanks Typhoeus, that puts it in better perspective!! Thanks for the link also - I saw your video, thankfully mine is not at the stage of knocking but has a horrible howl. I have really left the repair so long I'm so glad it hasn't ended up with the knocking and the final bang that you had experienced. I've been too lucky. Did you end up being able to recondition your diff in the end or you go for another second hand?
Cheers!!
 
#36
Thanks Typhoeus, that puts it in better perspective!! Thanks for the link also - I saw your video, thankfully mine is not at the stage of knocking but has a horrible howl. I have really left the repair so long I'm so glad it hasn't ended up with the knocking and the final bang that you had experienced. I've been too lucky. Did you end up being able to recondition your diff in the end or you go for another second hand?
Cheers!!
The diff that blew up was actually a replacement for the original noisy diff. I took the old diff ( with the whine) in and got it rebuilt. the gears were still good, and they lapped them in and replaced the bearings, cost about $400 i think, and i replaced the axle bearings etc so now shes good again.
 
#38
HollyKate Wasn't a diff but I had a gearbox rebuilt by Precision diffs & gearboxes on Port road in Adelaide a couple of years ago on my last vehicle & was very happy with the job although it did take a while as he was doing some extensions at the time. but I would still recommend him 10/10
 
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