The ways of old.

billolga

Well-Known Member
If any kids want to use my old nib pen and ink well ( left top of pic) , or the other nib pens, or fountain pens
I know, I know all this!:cool: You put the Girl in front's Plaits in the Ink Well (Or Flies & let them crawl over the paper) & the Pen nibs make grate Darts if you snap the ends off, split the back under the desk & add paper tails & they stick really well in the wooden Cieling of the Class Room. (If you got caught of course they gave you the cane):eek::D
 

Rojac

Well-Known Member
Darts if you snap the ends off, split the back under the desk & add paper tails & they stick really well in the wooden Cieling of the Class Room. (If you got caught of course they gave you the cane):eek::D

Or throw them into the overhead fan and yell incoming, and most of the class would put a book over their heads, at least that way the head was protected, bad luck about your legs and arms ( but only when the teachers weren't present)
 

mikehzz

Well-Known Member
I know, I know all this!:cool: You put the Girl in front's Plaits in the Ink Well (Or Flies & let them crawl over the paper) & the Pen nibs make grate Darts if you snap the ends off, split the back under the desk & add paper tails & they stick really well in the wooden Cieling of the Class Room. (If you got caught of course they gave you the cane):eek::D
Ah the cane.....I remember it well. My old English teacher broke it on me once. :) It should be compulsory for boys just in case they are contemplating misdemeanors. Enduring corporal punishment in front of your peers without cracking is an exercise in character building that doesn't happen anymore.
 

billolga

Well-Known Member
Or throw them into the overhead fan and yell incoming, and most of the class would put a book over their heads, at least that way the head was protected, bad luck about your legs and arms ( but only when the teachers weren't present)
And everyone thought WW2 Ended in 1945.
I am not sure if we were politically correct but WE thought it was fun.
 

greysrigging

Well-Known Member
Ah the cane.....I remember it well. My old English teacher broke it on me once. :) It should be compulsory for boys just in case they are contemplating misdemeanors. Enduring corporal punishment in front of your peers without cracking is an exercise in character building that doesn't happen anymore.

I went to a Presbyterian boarding school in Albury, NSW. The cane was in use back then and yes, I copped a few on the arse. The standard procedure was, after a caning, you had to proceed to the boys dunnys, drop ya daks and show your war wounds to your mates......any caning that didn't draw blood.....well your manhood was questioned !
 

JonKabir

New Member
I still remember my mother's loving fountain pen parker 45 (1964). Its nib is polished using steel. This brings along two benefits. For one, it makes the nib look shiny and attractive. Secondly, it makes the nib last longer. This is because still is pretty resilient to corrosion and other agents of deterioration.
 

Tybes52

New Member
I have always liked old things :)
I always get the new generation of floor sanders on instagram asking me why i don't buy a new drum sander, well the truth is i can't afford one lol, I get by just fine using my Australian made 1946 12" Vinco, I would like to see how many of the new machines are still holding up after 70 years of hard work, they don't make em like they used too :)
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Hi Barnsey062 , sorry to bother it’s just that I have the very same Vinco model. I do need to replace the drum rubber surface and just wondered if you know where to get this done, or how or what is needed to do that ?
kind regards
Tybes52
 

Ol' Harley

Active Member
I have always liked old things :)
I married one... :rolleyes:

Many a year ago, I studied photography at TAFE, using film, and learning how to develop and print film in a darkroom. To this day, the (rare) smell of developer and fixer solutions send me off into waves of nostalgia.

A few years ago, the wife and I were on a flight coming into Singapore. I'd taken a much older film camera with us (as well as a little digital compact) just for the exercise of thinking about exposures and the like, and to see how it stacked up against the digital. It was of an older kind where the film had to be manually advanced to the next frame with a lever. As we were coming in to land, the wife was using it to take a photograph out of the window, and the young stewardess politely reminded us that all electronic devices had to be switched off. I tried explaining that the camera didn't have a battery, not even for the light meter, but she wouldn't have it. Speaking to us like two year olds, she explained that all cameras have batteries. She simply would not - or could not - grasp the notion that here was something that could work without electrical power. We ended up giving in, it wasn't worth the fight.

I also recall that we had a (minor) hassle getting the film through, asking for it to be hand-checked rather than X-rayed (which can fog the film). Thankfully, amongst the young folks at the scanner, there was an older supervisor who was happy to do that separately.

It isn't just how did we do things in the old days - it's also how do we convince people that things were ever done differently.
 

Toyasaurus

Well-Known Member
In the old days you took your car to a mechanic or auto elect and they fixed the problem or reco`d the broken/worn parts.
I watched an auto elect completely take my alternator apart check the windings replace the brushes, machine the commutator, replace bearings.
Bead blast the housing and paint then reassemble and test it, all on a Saturday morning at a small workshop near Grafton.
Cost me about $75 which wasn`t a small amount, but it worked.

When I was a first year apprentice we spent the first 7-9mths in the apprentice training centre.
We were taught the basic`s, files, hacksaws, measuring, squares how to use lathes, mills, borers, grinders etc.
We did everything the hard way.
Worst was taking a 100 x 50mm bar and making it 25mm square with a hammer and cold chisel, many bruised hands and much swearing. (winter)

Some of the apprentices and tradesmen I saw on the last jobs I did in construction weren't very well trained if at all.

I`m being kind.
 

typhoeus

Well-Known Member
Some of the apprentices and tradesmen I saw on the last jobs I did in construction weren't very well trained if at all.

I`m being kind.
In the old days, the boss could soon tell who would be a good apprentice. The ones who took on the training exercise ( making a cube from bar stock) as a challenge rather than a boring chore, they are the ones who make good tradesmen
 

ULost2

Well-Known Member
Used a Blow Torch many times. It was used for removing LEAD Paint as well.
To get it & the kero pressure lamps going you had a small attachment with ASBESTOS in it with metho to get it hot enough for the kero to burn.
BTW we used Asbestos mats in the Kitchen & at School & as kids we threw Fibro in the fire to watch it explode.
Don't get me started on Asbestos -- if it's as bad as they make out there would be no one my age alive FFS .
 

ULost2

Well-Known Member
Old stuff still works; maybe not as good a newer modern but it still does it's job . A considered ''good'' 1960 camera is still a good camera (and likely still words) but the new stuff is better, far better actually but is superseded by even better every couple of years .
This surform; actually made in Ballarat (Vic) would be around 60 years old and was used on the family property . Somehow it became mine and it still does the job 'cause blades are still available .
 

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cam04

Well-Known Member
Old stuff still works; maybe not as good a newer modern but it still does it's job . A considered ''good'' 1960 camera is still a good camera (and likely still words) but the new stuff is better, far better actually but is superseded by even better every couple of years .
This surform; actually made in Ballarat (Vic) would be around 60 years old and was used on the family property . Somehow it became mine and it still does the job 'cause blades are still available .
I carry a small surform in my nailbag when doing gyproc and fibro work. Most useful thing invented.
 

LongRoad2Go

Well-Known Member
My initial education and training was in Surveying using optical theodolites, levels, and occasionally specialised tacheometers (now obsolete). EDM (electronic distance measuring) using visible/infrared light and microwaves were just coming in and the units bolted clumsily onto existing machines - a PITA to set up and use, but saved using the chains - actually a graduated steel band. Measurements were manually written in a specialised Field Book (a legal document).

A good Surveyor (that is, an employed Surveyor) could take vertical, horizontal, and height readings accurately and quickly, then move along a traverse. Those were the days when barometric pressure, temperature and calcs for air density/chain sag mattered. All necessary calculations and drawings were done by hand back in the office - handwriting was an actual taught subject ... most old maps or marine charts shows that expertise.

These days, with the advent of 'Total Stations', any monkey can use them and all measurements are saved in an electronic field book for downloading and automatic calculation, and printing via CAD. I question the accuracy of a point-and-shoot device, and the resultant professionalism of the dude behind the 'camera'.

Our team had a number of frequently serviced machines, with one hyper accurate geodetic theodolite (parts of a second of arc). And, one old dilapidated theodolite and level that were loaned out to the Engineers when they came asking for one - we NEVER loaned out the good ones because: (1) Engineers work to the closest centimetre at absolute best, and, (2) they treat a precision device like a shovel - throw it in the back of a ute and let it roll around.

The old Zeiss and Leica Theodolites were things of beauty - German precision tool making at its best. Total Stations are plastic toys in comparison ... bah humbug!
 

ULost2

Well-Known Member
I carry a small surform in my nailbag when doing gyproc and fibro work. Most useful thing invented.
I have the short and curved versions also. Curve is great for work large sticks to "art" . All started from Aerocessories manufacturer; first patented in 1953 -- that's too close to 70 years for me .
I would be thinking "Ballarat" would make mine somewhat rare . When I showed it to a bloke in Bunnings said it should framed on the wall.
 

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cam04

Well-Known Member
My initial education and training was in Surveying using optical theodolites, levels, and occasionally specialised tacheometers (now obsolete). EDM (electronic distance measuring) using visible/infrared light and microwaves were just coming in and the units bolted clumsily onto existing machines - a PITA to set up and use, but saved using the chains - actually a graduated steel band. Measurements were manually written in a specialised Field Book (a legal document).

A good Surveyor (that is, an employed Surveyor) could take vertical, horizontal, and height readings accurately and quickly, then move along a traverse. Those were the days when barometric pressure, temperature and calcs for air density/chain sag mattered. All necessary calculations and drawings were done by hand back in the office - handwriting was an actual taught subject ... most old maps or marine charts shows that expertise.

These days, with the advent of 'Total Stations', any monkey can use them and all measurements are saved in an electronic field book for downloading and automatic calculation, and printing via CAD. I question the accuracy of a point-and-shoot device, and the resultant professionalism of the dude behind the 'camera'.

Our team had a number of frequently serviced machines, with one hyper accurate geodetic theodolite (parts of a second of arc). And, one old dilapidated theodolite and level that were loaned out to the Engineers when they came asking for one - we NEVER loaned out the good ones because: (1) Engineers work to the closest centimetre at absolute best, and, (2) they treat a precision device like a shovel - throw it in the back of a ute and let it roll around.

The old Zeiss and Leica Theodolites were things of beauty - German precision tool making at its best. Total Stations are plastic toys in comparison ... bah humbug!
We have one orange Leica ‘builder’s’ dumpy left. Everything else is topcon and spins. Our dual grade laser is apparently pretty accurate. As you say though, nobody is accurate like a surveyor.
funny story, I flew a surveyor into Cape Flattery for a job we were doing building the differential GPS station up there. He surveyed the 30 odd (Leica) receiver heads in no time flat and had a few days to kill, so I got him to set out the line and holes of the 3 km odd boundary fence which was a godsend. We then ran around and threw in corner post holes and line holes every 50 odd metres in the sand. Fast forward a week or so and I’ve got a couple of the local lads setting up the posts and concreting them in. String out maybe 5 holes at a time then pour. Around 10 that morning they come to me asking for the post hole rig “because the pukin setout is wrong”. They’d gone slightly off line and kept going until they completely missed the next hole. Pulling the posts out I also discovered they had simply kicked sand in the holes and put a scab of concrete over the top. The joys of working with T.O. Trainees haha.
 
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LongRoad2Go

Well-Known Member
We have one orange Leica ‘builder’s’ dumpy left. Everything else is topcon and spins. Our dual grade laser is apparently pretty accurate. As you say though, nobody is accurate like a surveyor.
funny story, I flew a surveyor into Cape Flattery for a job we were doing building the differential GPS station up there. He surveyed the 30 odd (Leica) receiver heads in no time flat and had a few days to kill, so I got him to set out the line and holes of the 3 km odd boundary fence which was a godsend. We then ran around and threw in corner post holes and line holes every 50 odd metres in the sand. Fast forward a week or so and I’ve got a couple of the local lads setting up the posts and concreting them in. String out maybe 5 holes at a time then pour. Around 10 that morning they come to me asking for the post hole rig “because the pukin setout is wrong”. They’d gone slightly off line and kept going until the completely missed the next hole. Pulling the posts out I also discovered they had simply kicked sand in the holes and put a scab of concrete over the top. The joys of working with T.O. Trainees haha.
Yep, the Japs make good ones too. Probably in descending order: Topcon, Sokkisha, then Pentax. There was another brand I can't recall now that operated in a weird, unconventional way - like using calculators with reverse Polish notation versus 'normal' calculation methods. It was a hassle to use when time = money ... both are better spent inside a pub anyway!

Have never met a Surveyor who didn't like a beer ... for that matter, was not bordering on being a professional alcoholic! So, a slab or three is almost always a welcome full/part payment ... the beer economy = a sliding scale based on difficulty and workload.

I miss the profession, but Engineering pays much better and doesn't require being out in the heat of summer cutting lines through scrub.
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
I still have my old Sokkisha theodolite in the shed, it is a beautiful piece of gear and cost me a fortune back in the day. For building site work the lasers have pretty much made them redundant as they are slower to setup and require two people. I appreciate they are at a different level of accuracy but a laser is well within the acceptable tolerances in those circumstances
 
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