The ways of old.

Mr Rum

4x4 Earth Legend
I was just reading the latest posts in @rogerazz 's The Day My 1991 LANDCRUISER Troopy Died., and a post in there got me thinking.
The post I'm referring to is..
It's not only the current crop "tradesmen" ,had a blood pressure done and the nurse used the old hand bulb and read off the analog dial, she said that most of the nurses coming out now can't use those anymore and rely on the digital machines, too bad if there's no power

It's a sign of the times with technology, I still remember using a slide rule in the "old" days.
I had a story I wanted to share without hijacking that thread, and also thought that with the range of different aged users on this forum, that others might have more to add to the topic.

I'm interested to know:
- How the tasks we do today, using items many of us take for granted, were dealt with in the past.
- If people have encountered interesting contraptions from before their time, and how they work.
- Of any stories similar to the quoted post above, when you or someone else is/was stumped by older technology.​


I'll kick things off with the story I was about to share in the other thread...

I must admit, the first time I had to weigh a truck on a manual weighbridge had me scratching my head a little.
After having a look at it all, it was obvious to me how it worked, but it was an eye opener into how easy we have things these days.

For those that haven't had anything to do with "scales" before, I'll try to explain.

These days you usually park on a pressure sensitive pad that's long enough for your whole truck/trailer combination, and a digital display tells you your weight.
The display is sometimes within the field of view of the drivers seat, and other times it's in/on a hut alongside the pad.
Sometimes a weighbridge can even have a pad with multiple sections with a separate display for each. Meaning you can even read the weights of all your axle groups individually, without leaving the comfort of your air conditioned cab.
Easy.

Now for the older style one that I came across.
At first, it looked pretty much the same the more basic versions of what they make these days. A pad on the ground outside a little hut. I parked my selected axel group on the pad, and walked inside the hut.
This is where it got different.
The pad wasn't electronic like every other weighbridge I'd used previous, instead the pad outside was connected to a set of "scales" inside the hut.
I had to shift brass weights around on bars until everything was balanced, then add up the values that the different sized brass weights indicated on the bars to get the weight of the axle group on the pad.
Once I had that sorted, I had to move the truck, and repeat until I was done.

I know this is probably a bit confusing, but I can't work out a more effective way to explain it without numerous photos.
I don't drive trucks often these days, and I don't have to weigh the ones I do drive, but next time I'm near the scales in question, I'll see if I can grab a couple of photos (unless someone else can help out before then).
I did manage to find this photo online of a similar set of what was inside the hut, so hopefully it will help to paint a picture for the time being.

b789eb1bb7cb0e136634325b74516799.jpg
 
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Rojac

Well-Known Member
Soldering iron, and flame, a kero hand pump torch that the solder iron head would rest in the flame heat up then use, making sure to keep the thing pressurised so the flame doesn't go out, still have them as a relic of the past mainly

If you could you'd place the soldering iron on the gas stove to heat
 

Mr Rum

4x4 Earth Legend
Soldering iron, and flame, a kero hand pump torch that the solder iron head would rest in the flame heat up then use, making sure to keep the thing pressurised so the flame doesn't go out
I've only ever seen that type of iron used with a gas flame.
Is this the kind of torch you're referring to?

 

billolga

Well-Known Member
I've only ever seen that type of iron used with a gas flame.
Is this the kind of torch you're referring to?

Used a Blow Torch many times. It was used for removing LEAD Paint as well.
To get it & the kero pressure lamps going you had a small attachment with ASBESTOS in it with metho to get it hot enough for the kero to burn.
BTW we used Asbestos mats in the Kitchen & at School & as kids we threw Fibro in the fire to watch it explode.
 

Gavo

4x4 Earth Contributer
Just for those who are actually trying to come to grips with just how fast technology is moving. If you get a chance, this fellers video on transport and batteries etc is interesting.


We need to realise that it's moving faster than you realise.

 

mikehzz

Well-Known Member
When mum and dad bought their first house, they had no money left so we ended up with a really old pile of junk Dodge. It was so old you had to put a hand crank in the front to start it because it didn't have a battery or starter motor.
Do they still teach kids how to do multiplication and division by hand these days. Ask your kids to calculate 127799÷647 to 4 decimal places without a calculator. Give them a piece of paper, an ink pot full of ink, and an ink pen with a nib and ask them for the answer...it's how I used to have to do it at school. It might provide hours of fun for everyone? My father would have almost been able to do it in his head he was that good. Mind boggling. :)
 

rogerazz

4x4 Earth Contributer
When mum and dad bought their first house, they had no money left so we ended up with a really old pile of junk Dodge. It was so old you had to put a hand crank in the front to start it because it didn't have a battery or starter motor.
Do they still teach kids how to do multiplication and division by hand these days. Ask your kids to calculate 127799÷647 to 4 decimal places without a calculator. Give them a piece of paper, an ink pot full of ink, and an ink pen with a nib and ask them for the answer...it's how I used to have to do it at school. It might provide hours of fun for everyone? My father would have almost been able to do it in his head he was that good. Mind boggling. :)
Yep, still can do multiplication, addition, subtraction, and division real easy on paper. When the Missus or kids want figures for whatever added up, they just yell them up and I add them in my head and give them the total sum. Could be ten things could be fifty things. Actually when I buy stuff at shops and hand over the money, I calculate the change in my head.
If any kids want to use my old nib pen and ink well ( left top of pic) , or the other nib pens, or fountain pens ( explain to your kids that the three green blue and red carry ink you fill them with) , or my biros ( see their refills ) etc.?????
Pens biros.JPG
 
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rogerazz

4x4 Earth Contributer
Or if anyone wants to send a letter instead of a text, or email, you can borrow my typewriter. Sort of a keyboard type of thing.:D.
I will try and find stuff more related to camping, etc. later on.
Old typewriter.JPG
 

greysrigging

Well-Known Member
When mum and dad bought their first house, they had no money left so we ended up with a really old pile of junk Dodge. It was so old you had to put a hand crank in the front to start it because it didn't have a battery or starter motor.
Do they still teach kids how to do multiplication and division by hand these days. Ask your kids to calculate 127799÷647 to 4 decimal places without a calculator. Give them a piece of paper, an ink pot full of ink, and an ink pen with a nib and ask them for the answer...it's how I used to have to do it at school. It might provide hours of fun for everyone? My father would have almost been able to do it in his head he was that good. Mind boggling. :)
Thats right....older generations could do it ( I can ) because we were taught ( made to memorise ) the Times Tables. All three of my kids never 'got' long division by pen simply because they didn't have the instant answer to the times tables in their head.
 

80lover96gxl

Moderator
Nowdays music is recorded to usb sticks/cd's, I used to use a grundig reel to reel tape deck with a mic held next to the mono b&w TV
Yep use to do the same as a youngster, had a great collection until a flood 5 yrs ago ruined the lot.
 

barnsey062

Well-Known Member
I have always liked old things :)
I always get the new generation of floor sanders on instagram asking me why i don't buy a new drum sander, well the truth is i can't afford one lol, I get by just fine using my Australian made 1946 12" Vinco, I would like to see how many of the new machines are still holding up after 70 years of hard work, they don't make em like they used too :)
school shop job 078.jpg

before during after.jpg
 

greysrigging

Well-Known Member
My father was a self taught carpenter. He and Mum married young in 1958 and of course in those early years of their life together, they never had two bob to rub together. Dad actually built the furniture, ie cabinets, beds, tables in their first house. Here's a pic of the hand drill he used.....
20161018_062749.jpg

Then in about 1961 or 2 he sold a few cases of passionfruits at the markets and bought this new fangled electric drill. Its still a goer but I dont use that much as it is very heavy.
20161018_063143.jpg

Australian made, with an Australian patent.....built to last by Aussie manufacturers !
20161018_063156.jpg
 

typhoeus

Well-Known Member
My father was a self taught carpenter. He and Mum married young in 1958 and of course in those early years of their life together, they never had two bob to rub together. Dad actually built the furniture, ie cabinets, beds, tables in their first house. Here's a pic of the hand drill he used.....
View attachment 42448
Then in about 1961 or 2 he sold a few cases of passionfruits at the markets and bought this new fangled electric drill. Its still a goer but I dont use that much as it is very heavy.
View attachment 42449
Australian made, with an Australian patent.....built to last by Aussie manufacturers !
View attachment 42450
My old man had the same drill!
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
I have always liked old things :)
I always get the new generation of floor sanders on instagram asking me why i don't buy a new drum sander, well the truth is i can't afford one lol, I get by just fine using my Australian made 1946 12" Vinco, I would like to see how many of the new machines are still holding up after 70 years of hard work, they don't make em like they used too :)
View attachment 42447
View attachment 42446

I thought sanding gear was relatively cheap to come by ?
I know an ex floor layer who tried to give me his sanding gear, reckons he couldn't sell it as no one wants it ??
I bet the solid old machine of yours would work better anyway compared to the lighter new ones
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
My father was a self taught carpenter. He and Mum married young in 1958 and of course in those early years of their life together, they never had two bob to rub together. Dad actually built the furniture, ie cabinets, beds, tables in their first house. Here's a pic of the hand drill he used.....
View attachment 42448
Then in about 1961 or 2 he sold a few cases of passionfruits at the markets and bought this new fangled electric drill. Its still a goer but I dont use that much as it is very heavy.
View attachment 42449
Australian made, with an Australian patent.....built to last by Aussie manufacturers !
View attachment 42450

Grey that old drill reminded me of when I was an apprentice, they have a lot of torque and momentum and run on a bit after you turn them off

One of the other boys was drilling overhead in a big hardwood beam and then lowered the drill by his side for a rest
The drill Chuck got caught up in his overalls and wrapped his nuts around the chuck :eek::eek:
Poor bastard ended up in hospital for the night
 

moose2367

Member
On the farm putting up fences, old days was a shovel and crowbar, in real rocky country, might get a dozen or so posts up in a day, now with a tractor and post driver, get a hundred or more on a good run.
Then use a hydraulic drill and auger to drill the holes and a tractor to pull the wires, instead of drilling by hand or auger on a chainsaw attachment.
 

billolga

Well-Known Member
Ah the good old days, I like looking BACK on them but I am very pleased I am not using most of this stiff (Particularly the hand drill).
The other thing I think about was when I was stony broke (Keep in mind I was an "Airline Pilot" on slightly more pay than when I drove a delivery Truck) I built a Gate in a Fence with all the tools I had, A Hammer & a Screw Driver - I cut the wood (No Hand Saw - couldn't afford it) by putting it between two planks & jumping on it.
If you want to know what it was like check this out.:D (Good training for a Bush Mechanic)
 
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