The BIG Question

discomatt

Well-Known Member
If you can't see where that attitude is heading then you're not paying attention. Sometimes a person has to suck it up and get on with it for their own good, otherwise they do end up with a real mental health problem. Take the easy way, take a pill and the nasty feelings go away? If you say so.
Or put some serious thought into what is going on, have a supportive and understanding discussion which will mainly involve listening then seek professional help so there is not a life long struggle, and yes leave the happy pill until the last possible option
 

mikehzz

Well-Known Member
Or put some serious thought into what is going on, have a supportive and understanding discussion which will mainly involve listening then seek professional help so there is not a life long struggle, and yes leave the happy pill until the last possible option
The mother knew that it was just a teenage moment of insecurity, that we all had when we were teenagers, and rightly laughed it off. But wait, in modern society it's a serious mental health event and she needs counseling. It's not the kid who has the mental problems, it's the adults who might tell her she does. She's half way there by being able to label it.
 
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cam04

Well-Known Member
If you can't see where that attitude is heading then you're not paying attention. Sometimes a person has to suck it up and get on with it for their own good, otherwise they do end up with a real mental health problem. Take the easy way, take a pill and the nasty feelings go away? If you say so.
Exactly. The kid in my pic above is a ranga and has a decent dose of ocd. You think we have pussy footed around it or given him a harder time than normal? There is nothing anyone can say to him about being a ranga that will set him off because he has already heard them all from his father and his uncle. We play games with his OCD all the time to keep him constantly questioning what is a decision and what is unconscious, and making him find the boundaries of what he can do. Not to mention plenty of humorous derision. Mental health IS an illness like any other, and once you’ve accepted it, you can move on and keep living, not run around expecting the world to stop for you. He got an X-box for his birthday on the weekend, which is awesome, but his study table is now not symmetrical anymore, so at 0500 yesterday morning we ALL woke to the sounds of him rearranging his whole bedroom enough to let him sleep in it again……. But he’s happy again now and we continue. Unfortunately for him, his generation all need some sort of title apparently and he has slipped through the cracks a bit until we and his school support got a good handle on it. Kids seem to throw mental health issues into anything to get leverage and they need to be robustly interrogated prior to accepting their word for it, because half of it is crap and the ones who need real help get lost in the white noise. Same with proper DV victims getting lost in a system overloaded by mean horrible people using the police as a marital separation tool. I have my morning coffee overlooking Hannah Clark’s memorial in Camp Hill and we knew her indirectly so that is a sore point with me.
 
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