Solar blankets and soft style panels

#41
I was told by ARB not to use a regulated panel with my redarc system as that does all the work. Im more confused now than ever.
I think they would of only meant not to use both regulates at the same time.
If your redarc dcdc charger is solor ready thats all you need at a minimum.

So the cable coming directly from the panels will go only to the redarc. Some panels thats easy as just not plugging in the regulator that comes with the solor panel. Some you'll need to make a few small modifications. Eg if im correct projector style have a in built regulator which you'll need to by pass. (Well that what tjm told me).
 
#42
Hey Cruiser,
Yeah, the Redarc system has a built in regulator, which is generally more efficient than the cheapie regulators that come with panels, although you can buy quality mppt regulators.$$$ So, people generally disconnect the cheapie and hook it up to their Battery Management Systems or their dcdc chargers, which both have inbuilt solar regulators. Solar panels put out high voltage and irregular current, so the regulator brings it down to the right voltage and amperage. The BMS or dcdc chargers do this efficiently and have stages to boost, float, etc.
What I didn't say clearly up above is that I left the cheap pwm regulator on my panels but it is disconnected, just there if I need it at some point.
The old 3 way fridge seems pretty carefree compared to all this, eh?

PP
 
#43
Thanks guys. So just to clear things up. If I plugged solar with regulator into my redarc ( via Anderson plug ) it won't fritz anything just not as efficient?

And plugging in unregulated is fine?

Apologies for the repetitive questions. I had an auxiliary system fitted by ARB with no extra thought to charging while parked for days. I'm still learning bucket loads at the moment.
 
#44
Hi Cruiser,

No, my understanding is that if it has its own pwm or mppt regulator and you want to plug it into a redarc BMS or DCDC charger (Redarc call them BCDC chargers) you should first disconnect the original regulator. It's most likely you will get more current (amps) from your panel if you let the Redarc unit do the work. Otherwise the original regulator is likely to restrict the flow more than the Redarc unit.
Of course, this assumes that the Redarc unit has a solar input, usually a different colour to the vehicle alternator input. Which model Redarc is it? You should be able to download the manual from the Redarc website, it has a heap of information on it.
I've found them pretty helpful to phone, as well.
Worth putting Anderson plugs on your cabling to allow easy disconnection etc. Personally, I'd use at least 8 B&S cabling, too.
G.
 
#45
Hi Cruiser,

No, my understanding is that if it has its own pwm or mppt regulator and you want to plug it into a redarc BMS or DCDC charger (Redarc call them BCDC chargers) you should first disconnect the original regulator. It's most likely you will get more current (amps) from your panel if you let the Redarc unit do the work. Otherwise the original regulator is likely to restrict the flow more than the Redarc unit.
Of course, this assumes that the Redarc unit has a solar input, usually a different colour to the vehicle alternator input. Which model Redarc is it? You should be able to download the manual from the Redarc website, it has a heap of information on it.
I've found them pretty helpful to phone, as well.
Worth putting Anderson plugs on your cabling to allow easy disconnection etc. Personally, I'd use at least 8 B&S cabling, too.
G.
Its the 1225D model, yes with solar input. Anderson cable all fitted in under bonnet ready for solar charging. Now if i can only work out what the hell solar panel i need im a happy chappy.
 
#47
When I tried to connect stand alone portable panel through the ctek DC DC charger the cheapo regulator on the panel would not work and therefore stuff all output, apparently if the cheapo could not “see” the battery it would not work or let any power through, adjusted wiring with a few Anderson plugs so that cheapo regulator could be bypassed when panel connected this way direct to, via more Anderson plug connections, ctek worked a charm, if solar panel required for another purpose say charging car battery cheapo regulator is there by adjusting the Anderson plugs so that the regulator is back in circuit
 

sharkcaver

Well-Known Member
#48
Its the 1225D model, yes with solar input. Anderson cable all fitted in under bonnet ready for solar charging. Now if i can only work out what the hell solar panel i need im a happy chappy.
Check the specs of the 1225D. The original redarcs, std/ign/lv etc(non dual type) had a solar voltage switch on threshold of 17.5V. This worked fine with 21Voc panels, but you couldn't get 18Voc panels to turn the redarc's on. I had to problem solve quite a few peoples "why isnt my redarc taking solar" problems. I haven't kept up to date on their newer models such as the dual input (d), but best you read the manual. If its still 17.5V switch on, then only get 21Voc (or greater) panels or you will be in for some pain.
 
#54
I've been umming and ahhing about the 4wdsupercentre 200w for around $330-$340. Finding current 120w not really enough grunt when away and have a few cloudy days. Was going to run both into camper when camped.

Anyone used theirs?
 

callmejoe

Well-Known Member
#56
Yeah some helpful info, I'm now more set on the soft panel style. Changed my idea as the soft panels still pack pretty small, better ability to stand and direct at the sun and not much weight. So my orginial blanket idea has changed.
Still tossing up on.

Kick@rse 150w @ $ 548 plus freight ($40ish)
Hardkorr 200w @ $799 no freight charge

As mentioned I'd like 2 solar units so keeping them matched is a given.
The camper has a 80L weaco plus a big arse power converter big enough 4 a toaster. And in the 4wd (80Lfridge plus 40Lfreezer).
Once we find a good spot we tend to stay put for a few days. Fish, or try)walk and beer and pretty just that..
But the 4wd does have 250amp or something, lay flat AGM battery, weights a bom.

Camping up nth the fridges/freezer run pretty hard. And i stock ALOT of beer.. If my wifes beers gets hot, nice knowing you all.
 

dno67

Well-Known Member
#57
Keeping them matched is not so much about there wattage, its there output voltage you need to match some are 12v 24v 36v
So as an example, you can have.
200w 12v
200w 24v
200w 36v
 

callmejoe

Well-Known Member
#58
Keeping them matched is not so much about there wattage, its there output voltage you need to match some are 12v 24v 36v
So as an example, you can have.
200w 12v
200w 24v
200w 36v

I thought it was best to keep panel as similar as possible.
If parreling 2 panels and they are different watts. Eg 1 200w and 1 150w a result i was lead to believe "could" happen is the larger panel (in this case 200w) may not utilize all its cell, it sort of equalizing to the 150w..
So by mis matching panels (parrel) i could be wasting 50w..

No idea if I'm right...
 

dno67

Well-Known Member
#59
I thought it was best to keep panel as similar as possible.
If parreling 2 panels and they are different watts. Eg 1 200w and 1 150w a result i was lead to believe "could" happen is the larger panel (in this case 200w) may not utilize all its cell, it sort of equalizing to the 150w..
So by mis matching panels (parrel) i could be wasting 50w..

No idea if I'm right...
You could be right, but l don't think it matters. As far as l'm aware, a single regulator only see's the total input. As long as the voltage is the same.
Waiting to be shot down now.
 
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