Snatch Recovery - Explained

muc the truck

Well-Known Member
Nope.....only the elasticity of the snatch strap caused this tragic accident...

nope only the idiot that used fence wire to join the chain cause the accident .
its not recovery related . the tire should have been towed with a chain. snatch straps are not to used for towing . we all know that.

I own a snatch strap and i rather take it easy , i take the tow vehicle to motion and imediatly stop pressing the excelerator and let the rolling wiegh apl stretch then i aply my brake and act as a achor . the stretch pulls the car out . this may take 3-4 attemps but atleast i dont rip clean off a tow point off a car and make a deadly weapon like what happened to your car willem.

I use snatches but i do not drive off like i am going to ram raid a bottle shop or take out Automatic Teller Machine and the bank like the person did that ripped your front end off.
 
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Patrick Albrecht

Active Member
I’ve been in many stations threw out WA NT and SA in my work over the years never seen or heard of draging a tyre behind a vehicle.

With a Quick think, if I had to do this I would of used a length of chain joined with a D link that breaks open at a factory made resistance (100kg, 300kg etc) Not to mention a dampner of some sort
 

goldrush

Moderator
Nope.....only the elasticity of the snatch strap caused this tragic accident...

Are you for real????? This accident was caused by stupidity. If someone died from jumping off a bridge would you blame the bridge for being too high??

This thread was meant to explain the theory behind using a snatch strap NOT whether you approve of it or not. We all know your opinion so it's time to move on and let those who do use them explain the safest way to do so.
 

Les PK Ranger

4x4 Earth Contributer
I own a snatch strap and i rather take it easy , i take the tow vehicle to motion and imediatly stop pressing the excelerator and let the rolling wiegh apl stretch then i aply my brake and act as a achor . the stretch pulls the car out . this may take 3-4 attemps but atleast i dont rip clean off a tow point off a car and make a deadly weapon like what happened to your car willem.

I use snatches but i do not drive off like i am going to ram raid a bottle shop or take out Automatic Teller Machine and the bank like the person did that ripped your front end off.

I rather think this is the best plan, haven't tried that idea of applying brake at full stretch of strap. Perfect plan for sand.

So i leave my snatchy's at home and the High lift Jack (well one snatch is in the ARB Bag and is brand new after 5 years,so hasn't been used,the tree protector straps been well used as has the winch extension strap) although i hate mud and clay and try and avoid the sh!t as much as possible...

Ive been snatched once and the hands came off the steering wheel,the elbow hit the arm rest at a high rate and it bl@@dly hurt..So i made the decision then it was going to be my first and last snatch is the 4wd sense..

I am not anti snatch but believe the best place is the beach where its softer..

Also think you're spot on re mud Swaggie.
Had one really hard snatch I did off a beach (sloping sand, uphill snatch, bogged well even though dug out as best possible) on a large and very loaded Patrol, wow 3 goes, bigger each time, shook shite out of my rig (but nothing broke, so know boundries now, I guess).
Can imagine how difficult and much more unsafe snatching might be in mud, the sucking forces are sometimes unforgiving.
Definitely a winch in many of these cases is far more safe.
 

Just2geros

New Member
Giday, I have seen a hitch pin , bend in the hitch , took hour's to extract snatch strap. the strength of the hitch , is both sides of the hitch square , not in the middle! Hope you can see my point & buy a snatch hitch , not too expensive , but saves cutting up your hitch pin?
Just2geros
 

muc the truck

Well-Known Member
Giday, I have seen a hitch pin , bend in the hitch , took hour's to extract snatch strap. the strength of the hitch , is both sides of the hitch square , not in the middle! Hope you can see my point & buy a snatch hitch , not too expensive , but saves cutting up your hitch pin?
Just2geros

I helped remove a recovery hitch from a second hand 4x4 a friend bought . he wanted to tow a trailer . the pin had bent and since it was in there for so long welded too. the first hour was with a hammer but we got sick of that. took about 2 hours to get it out al up. after getting the pin out by cuting it and using a air impact chissel with a small end to knock it out as it too was rusted when then used a high presure gernie . paint striper type to dislodge the rust while hitting it with a inpact chishel with a hammer head atachment while under load on a snatch strap atached to a post and the car parked with the handbrake on. safty chain atached to d shake so it only moved six inches. it was s mission . It was liberaly greased with antisease .
 

bluedogpet

New Member
Thanks for the good info, especially the position of the loose coiled part of the snatch so as the driver of the recovery vehicle can see what's going on, and to sdollery, for the info about the joining of snatch straps
cheers. Any tips out there about using a high lift jack as a winch?
 

cookie64

4x4 Earth Contributer
Well my only advice is ditch the High Lift and buy a TIRFOR Hand Winch or Electric Winch.... ;)

There are YouTube videos about using a high lift as a winch...

Yep, I agree with Swaggie, used to own a high lift but it now sits in the shed - got jammed once and got a nice bruise trying to unjam it, fortunately it was a hard concrete surface it was on else it may have been worse. Seen someone else get smacked in the head as well with one as the force when letting it down is quite high

Sure they are a quick and easy way to change a tyre or the like but the risk outweighs the benefits in my book.

cheers
 

rogerazz

4x4 Earth Contributer
Any tips out there about using a high lift jack as a winch?

Recently we recovered a vehicle with a blown front diff on a very steep incline on forest track.
Rear of vehicle was pointing off track to left side and rear needed to be pulled to the right to bring back on track. Because we were not prepared to take another vehicle up behind to maybe use a winch and block tackle, we hooked a hi lift jack to a tree off right side of track.
We used a tree trunk protector and shackle to do this. On the other side we hooked a chain and tow strap to rear point on vehicle and slowly pulled it sideways back on track. We also used two dampeners for safety and a shovel to dig a track for the rear wheels to slide along sideways easier. A short pull of about two metres, taking care of using and releasing the handle on the Hi lift Jack each time. Was not my vehicle so was not overly concerned how pulling sideways may damage axles, bearings, wheels etc.
Would never use the Jack for long pulls instead of a snatch strap or a winch, be it hand or electric.
By the way the recovered vehicle had no winch and no recovery gear whatsoever, nothing.
All the gear was mine.
 
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alvittos

New Member
Clubs generally do a good job in recovery because they get into trouble and need to get out. The driver training covers some recovery methods but it gets down to common sense.
 
So I have just read through this thread from first to last. Willem is a goose. End of story. Goose.

Below is actually the best post in the thread bar none and should replace the wordy original post that IMO asks for a number of extra things I don't think are necessary and so much wording as to confuse everyone.

Everyone should read Riggas thread. Everything you need to know is there. Do what he said.

Consider all the variables, consider the risk. Know your equipment. Understand the load and think about how deep the car is bogged.

Clear out the bow wave of bog if you can and use the amount of force necessary to extract the car. No more than that! Don't hesitate to have a few goes at the extraction starting off softly, if that is not enough then reverse back and try again a little harder. You don't have to succeed the first pull.

To the guy using his 15year old snatch strap still....... It's Old, Its Used, They are Cheap! Don't be a fool, buy a new one! That is an accident waiting to happen.

To the guy asking about snatching off a spring hanger because you don't have a tow bar or rear recovery point? Don't go 4wdriving until your car is recoverable. Fit a rated recovery point to the front and the back and buy a decent snatch strap rated to 8,000kgs. That is the minimum requirements to be track ready. Most clubs won't let you on a day drive without a rated front and rear recovery point and your own snatch strap. If I found you stuck in a hole in the bush without a recovery point I would offer you a lift out and abandon your vehicle. Your car stopped becoming my problem when I could not safely recover it.

VVVVVV. Thanks Rigga for a great post. VVVVVVV

The most important things tonote with snatch recovery is that all recovery points are strong. Your strap should be the weak link, not the potential missile it's attached to. They do break, will break, and are supposed to break. Around $100 for probably your most important and most used piece of 4wdriving equipment is nothing IMO.

The recovery vehicle should merely be providing a tug to provide the momentum necessary for the stuck vehicle to gain motion. The elasticity and 2m of slack will dampen the shock loading on the vehicles and recovery points.

The numbers written or stamped, etc on recovery equipment is its BREAKING STRENGTH unless preceded by the letters WLL or SWL. The Working Load Limit or Safe Working Load is a strictly regulated standard denoting the Breaking Strength divided by a Safety Factor of 6.
In other words, a SWL 3.25t bow shackle has a Breaking Strength of 19.5t (approx 39000lbs). However a typical snatch strap has a breaking strength of 8000kgs (approx 16000lbs). Were it to be used in a regulated workplace it's SWL or WLL would be around 1300kg (2600lb).

NEVER join straps together with shackles, only use strong recovery points, stand well clear, establish a clear and concise communication method (horn, two-way radio, ect), use only enough power necessary, never panic.
And always practice somewhere in a controlled environment first. A campsite or driveway at home with a mate maybe. Same applies to all your equipment, no good trying to learn how to use it when you need to know how to use it.

I've been involved in many snatch recoveries and have broken straps. It's no big deal. I'd sooner a strap fail than a shackle, etc. After a while they will lose their elasticity, like a spring will, and eventually break or require replacement.
Every vehicle in your convoy should be carrying a snatch strap as the very minimum piece of essential recovery gear, so spares should be available.
I have tied a new eye on a broken strap, this is their most common weak point due to stitching failure, grit in the stitching, etc. I wouldn't tie it mid-length though as breakage here would indicate that the straps passed its used-by date. Broken snatch straps make great tow ropes, and emergency winch extension straps if after using all your straps you're still 5m short of a tree.
 
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