Slippery Hill - nearly ended in tears

Donald Topping

New Member
My son sent me a recent youtube clip, similar to your experience, think an 80 series which he had in 4 wheel drive.
Got 2/3rds way up and still came down backwards, luckily he kept it straight but still was a whiter shade of pale :)
so even in 4 wheel drive you can end up with the same result
I had an 80 series do a front right brake line, while I was waiting for the winch to be connected to pull me up. Reversing down hill with only 3 brakes active till you possibly bleed out is terrifying, but I engine braked all the way down. The 80 made it home after blocking the broken brake line. Scary as hell sitting on a steep incline knowing you have stuff all brakes. I did have it in first gear, low range, and handbrake on at the time the line let go.
 

phs

Well-Known Member
From previous experience involving clay on roads is you need to be in 4wd and in gear at all times no brakes use low range 1st and rev to steer if you are being a passenger due to uncontrolled sliding, I know it sounds strange to accelerate but you will be going faster if you have locked up and you dont get any steering when Locked up on clay
 
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Hoyks

Well-Known Member
In modern vehicles with ABS and traction control it isn't so important anymore, but in cars like yours the rule is to never ever use the brakes down hill or exactly what happened to you, will happen. Engine braking only, using either low or high range. If it super slippery, sometimes low range isn't an option either as the compression locks the wheels.
I think the basics still apply, ABS on a lot of vehicles works down to a set speed (I've seen 20km/h quoted on some models), so you can still lock the wheels up and find yourself behind the wheel of a toboggan.
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
I think the basics still apply, ABS on a lot of vehicles works down to a set speed (I've seen 20km/h quoted on some models), so you can still lock the wheels up and find yourself behind the wheel of a toboggan.
I’ve never driven a vehicle with speed dependent abs, or maybe I have and didn’t know. I know I’ve driven auto 105 cruisers downhill towing a trailer with both feet on the brake and abs preventing any sort of lockup and wishing to hell I’d remembered to pull the abs fuse. That is a toboggan ride. These days we have hill descent control which runs through the abs and works very well. Every car is slightly different though.
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
My weekend up at Walhalla ended in tears for one driver, he amazingly got out relatively unscathed after barrel rolling 3 times.
Lesson is never take steep , slippery and shaley hills for granted , treat 4wding with the respect it deserves when doing the hard stuff
30891B90-A538-4CAC-99D4-9676627DAA2C.jpeg
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
My weekend up at Walhalla ended in tears for one driver, he amazingly got out relatively unscathed after barrel rolling 3 times.
Lesson is never take steep , slippery and shaley hills for granted , treat 4wding with the respect it deserves when doing the hard stuff View attachment 75355
Ouch

Things can go wrong very quickly even for quite experienced drivers. That looks like it could have easily been a lot worse.
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
Winching up, car drove a bit, it had about 2m slack on the rope , car stalled, went to restart it and somehow managed to roll backwards, the jolt on the winch rope dislodged the tree, which hadn’t moved at all while winching, the weight of the car pulled the tree right over , the tree trunk protector slide up and off the tree, he was a passenger from then on until it stopped 100m down the hill.
 

John U

Well-Known Member
Winching up, car drove a bit, it had about 2m slack on the rope , car stalled, went to restart it and somehow managed to roll backwards, the jolt on the winch rope dislodged the tree, which hadn’t moved at all while winching, the weight of the car pulled the tree right over , the tree trunk protector slide up and off the tree, he was a passenger from then on until it stopped 100m down the hill.
Wow.
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
Not as expensive as the new Raptor that was doing the river crossing at Coopers Creek in the dark, missed the exit point and drove into a hole with only the rear of the tub out of the water, they then tried to recover it with a bit of rope and ratchet straps, a whole group with no idea between them
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
Winching up, car drove a bit, it had about 2m slack on the rope , car stalled, went to restart it and somehow managed to roll backwards, the jolt on the winch rope dislodged the tree, which hadn’t moved at all while winching, the weight of the car pulled the tree right over , the tree trunk protector slide up and off the tree, he was a passenger from then on until it stopped 100m down the hill.

A good length of winch rope extension is a vital piece of safety gear that is often overlooked. How many times have we all hitched up to a tree thinking "I wish it was a bit thicker", or it would be nice if I could reach that tree just a bit further?

I have 3 Dyneema pieces that total about 50m, plus the winch rope. The rope extensions are heaps better than straps cause you can run them through a pulley too. They don't weigh much or take up much room.
 

John U

Well-Known Member
A good length of winch rope extension is a vital piece of safety gear that is often overlooked. How many times have we all hitched up to a tree thinking "I wish it was a bit thicker", or it would be nice if I could reach that tree just a bit further?

I have 3 Dyneema pieces that total about 50m, plus the winch rope. The rope extensions are heaps better than straps cause you can run them through a pulley too. They don't weigh much or take up much room.
I carry 30m (10 + 20) worth of extension straps.

Having a couple of different lengths can save a bit of resetting effort too. Can be safer.
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
Back in my Hilux days we got caught at the bottom of a blocked track and couldn’t get back out as it started to rain. Had nearly 300 metres of straps and rope’s connected including 100 metres of wire rope connected a forestry log skidder to drag 3 vehicles up the hill. It was meant to be a day trip but were there 4 days o_O
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
Not as expensive as the new Raptor that was doing the river crossing at Coopers Creek in the dark, missed the exit point and drove into a hole with only the rear of the tub out of the water, they then tried to recover it with a bit of rope and ratchet straps, a whole group with no idea between them
Soon every insurance company will exclude river crossings.
 

Swaggie

Moderator
A good length of winch rope extension is a vital piece of safety gear that is often overlooked. How many times have we all hitched up to a tree thinking "I wish it was a bit thicker", or it would be nice if I could reach that tree just a bit further?

Vehicles can be replaced People can’t glad there good Although no doubt shaken..

I reckon the problem is over the years areas that are subject to high winching have been winched to death. Theyve ringbarked and killed trees making the next available tree/s basically out of reach unless you have a 30-50m extension or longer…
Use tree protectors.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
Vehicles can be replaced People can’t glad there good Although no doubt shaken..

I reckon the problem is over the years areas that are subject to high winching have been winched to death. Theyve ringbarked and killed trees making the next available tree/s basically out of reach unless you have a 30-50m extension or longer…
Use tree protectors.
That's a good point. And another good reason to avoid all the hoon areas close to Melbourne.

I reckon you have to get 5 - 6 hours from Melbourne at least, to avoid the mud holes, adrenalin and hoonery these days.
 
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cam04

Well-Known Member
Driving to ‘help’ a winch has never been ok. It crept in from watching extreme winch challenge vehicles and now you see every 4wd show doing it so learners have no clue that it isn’t good. Dynamic loading should be kept to a minimum as it always ends poorly - as seen above.
 
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John U

Well-Known Member
Driving to ‘help’ a winch has never been ok. It crept in from watch extreme winch challenge vehicles and now you see every 4wd show doing it so learners have no clue that it isn’t good. Dynamic loading should be kept to a minimum as it always ends poorly - as seen above.
Was wondering about this.
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
I have always and will continue to slowly drive to help a winch, what I do though is if a bit of slack is on the cable I stop driving and get the rope tight again, never leave slack on the rope , never sit on a hill in neutral , always have a good handbrake and always use it if not driving
In the case of the hill we were driving to winch only and not assist with driving would quickly overheat any winch , it was about 200m from bottom to top and all of it was snotty, wet, loose and slippery
At the end of the day not to be single fault or mistake caused the accident, multiple things compounded to end with the worst result.
It just reinforces the need to take your time, think and stay focused
 
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