Road handling on bitumen - slip sliding along.

I was amazed how the far more aggressive Falken ATs outperformed the Dunlop Hwy tyres that came std on the BT50 in every way on road.
Blokes said the Dunlops were crap but I thought they had enough grip in the wet but had to run them hard or get a mushy steering response.

If they were not so good as an allrounder I would have got a set of steel wheels with MTs
I go into forests solo so the best thing to do with bog holes is avoid them and only good muddies with good tread are gonna help you get through them.
 

Rusty Panels

Well-Known Member
They look to be well worn to me. As the others have said the rubber has probably gone hard with age as well. When you work out how much rubber is actually contacting the road surface with an aggressive tread pattern it would equate to very little.
It is probably worth investing in a new set of tyres that suit your driving style and intentions. If your not going to be tackling too much harsh terrain then all terrains may suit you better than muds.
Also don't forget the most important thing which is that most four wheel drives aren't renowned for their handling capabilities.
 

Ron0z

Active Member
A nice idea about swapping tyres. It's worth considering. The only downside is that if you are out and about and suddenly need to get off the bitumen you'll be at a disadvantage if the car is wearing street tyres. There's about 4 to 5 mm of tread depth on these tyres. This link underscores the age issue: 10 years is noted. The car is in the garage at the moment. So, I won't be able to check their age for a while.
 

Ron0z

Active Member
They usually are around 15 mm new.
Okay. See how new I am to this game!

Though, it occurs to me that while 15mm of rubber might dig into the mud and provide traction, it seems to me that that amount of rubber on bitumen might be quite wobbly. Or is the tread tough enough not to do that?
 

Outrage

4x4 Earth Contributer
Mud (and all-terrain) tyres are usually a much more rigid construction than a road tyre. So any increased flexibility from the deeper tread is compensated for in the rest of the tyre.

Compared to a road tyre, you will actually find the ride more harsh for that reason.

For extra info, some brands will use a compound that is orientated to long life, while others use a softer compound that improves grip, but will wear quick. Some of the brands that were known for getting a long life, user reports usually said they had to be extra careful when driving in the wet. But this information isn't really advertised, so it's hard to know what you're getting.
 

Ron0z

Active Member
Thanks Outrage. There's really a lot of stuff to know with tyres. Thanks for your/everyone's advice. (Glad I posted.)
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
Okay. See how new I am to this game!

Though, it occurs to me that while 15mm of rubber might dig into the mud and provide traction, it seems to me that that amount of rubber on bitumen might be quite wobbly. Or is the tread tough enough not to do that?
With fairly new mud tyres on anything bigger than a zuk, after any half enthusiastic driving on bitumen it is not uncommon to see the vertical surfaces of the tread blocks scuffed down about 5-6mm from the wearing face of the tyre. That is the mud tyre squirming and tearing itself up on the road. They are great for touring and fine enough when new, but yours are about stuffed in mud tyre world and you need new ones if you want to have any sort of usable Highway grip. The reality of owning them day to day is they last much less and use more fuel than a more boring looking AT and are worse at about 90% of things tyres do. But if looking good to strangers or driving in actual hardcore low traction situations is extremely important, get some new ones soon because as you’ve now seen first hand, old muds in the rain are widow makers.
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
Sounds like a bit of a combination of first light rain after a dry spell lifting oils/dirt etc... to the surface with the older harder mud tyre rubber. I havent really paid that much attention to BFG MT wet road performance as I dont run MT's, but I have heard their AT's are not the best out there in wet weather so one could only see the MTs as being a worse performer.
Side note my previous tyres where Toyo AT and they got progressivly worse on wet roads as they got older. My current Falken AT's grip fantastically in the wet - probably the best wet road AT grip I've ever run with
 

typhoeus

Well-Known Member
Tires should have a minimum vehicle weight, as light cars don't have enough weight to squeeze the tread of heavy duty A/T's or muddies flat on bitumen at normal pressures.
 

Hoyks

Well-Known Member
Tires should have a minimum vehicle weight, as light cars don't have enough weight to squeeze the tread of heavy duty A/T's or muddies flat on bitumen at normal pressures.
Yep, thats why what was a standard tyre size for a commodore would have a tyre placard recommendation of 32psi was only 20psi when fitted on the sierra.
 

Komang

Active Member
Ha! Ha!
Reminds me of when I put my five kids through Defensive and Advanced driving courses.
The instructor was explaining road driving conditions and said ideally when roads are dry you have slicks on .If it starts raining you pull over and change to wet weather tyres.:D
Sound like your kids in Formula business :)
 
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