Ranger PxII common spairs

Aye aye skipper

New Member
Hi all
I am using my time in lock down to get the beginnings of the dream year+ long lap of aus trip plans in order. With plans to do a few of the big ticket 4x4 bucket list tracks
I will be in my 2016 ford ranger px2
It has bar work, ome bp51 suspension, an upgrade transmission with cooler, snorkel winch, fuel pre filter, catch can, and 33" maxxis razor's
I would like to find out what items I should include in the spares box?? The opinions of some people with more experience in the px2 would be greatly appreciated but don't want to take the whole spares department, too much room and far to heavy,
Fan belt, air & fuel filters, uni, steering rod,
Cv's,?

Thanks for any advice
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
Top intercooler hose. If you still have the factory wheel nuts, they will leave you stranded - ditch them for steel ones. The OME front lower shock bushes flog out - they are a press fit item and only available at ARB - I’d get a set of spares unless your suspension is new.
Not much else you can service on them apart from your list. Everything else that breaks is a show stopper these days.
If you plan on doing your own oil changes be aware that there is a finite amount of time you can leave the 3.2 crankcase without oil in it - Google it. No big deal, just don’t leave the sump plug out and go to the pub.
 
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Rusty Panels

Well-Known Member
Definitely fan belt and fuel filter. If you keep your vehicle in good shape and well maintained you should be pretty safe. Unless you drive like Evel Knievel you are unlikely to break too much.
Dirty fuel and busted belts do happen though.
 

red hilux

Well-Known Member
Air filter and radiator hoses

some of the stuff mentioned. It’s best to find hidy holes in the car that aren’t used for anything. Just stow all his crap in there and have them with you at all times. Most likely you won’t need them but things can happen even 5 mins from home.

oh another thing to carry. Find a nice storage point and just carry with you is a fishing rod and tackle.
Been many times I wished I had one with me.
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
The make of car is not relevant other than any inherent issues with any particular models. Yours is mainly covered with an additional trans cooler
Before long trips I make sure all consumable items are like new, if I need to spend 5k to bring the car up to scratch so what, I then take 1 fuel filter and 1 air filter.
Other than that its a few nuts and bolts, some fencing wire, cable ties and few basic tools
 

Lost1?

Well-Known Member
I carry 2 rolls of gaffer tape rather than spare hoses. push the hose back into shape and wrap the hose tightly. Make sure yo go about 25-30mm past the end of the split. I have driven around for another month after that running repair on a radiator hose without loosing water. Make sure you seal filters with tape and bubble wrap to keep them clean. Ute tubs are known to let a lot of dust in. A fuel filter full of bulldust is no better than a filter full of sludgy crap. Like others assorted screws, nuts, bolts, washers and a couple of hose clamps in a container.

If I need to do a service on the road I buy from the local Repco or whoever is close by. I recommend you plan to purchase this stuff at major regional centres so you can readily source suitable oils and have a level of confidence you will get the parts you need.
 

TimNWVic

Member
I'm new to remote 4wd travel, so nothing to add other than more questions, but might as well keep it together in this thread...

Broken CV - you can't really keep driving with the broken parts crunching away can you? So assuming you don't carry an actual cv, does everyone carry the tools (and knowledge) to at least remove the broken cv? Can keep driving in 2wd to get to a town at least.

If you were crossing the Simpson or somewhere similar you'd probably struggle in 2wd, would it be worth carring a spare cv?
 

Lost1?

Well-Known Member
I run 33" tyres on a triton. Don't flog the ute up uneven step ups where you are shock loading the front axles. Drive at a steady pace until you get stuck. Then pull out the winch cable.

I have a snatch strap. But never use it for the same reason I don't charge up uneven obstacles. Regularly shock loading any part of your drivetrain will result in breakage at some stage. Slow and steady with the right tyre pressures and you won't need to carry heavy repair parts like CV.
 

Aye aye skipper

New Member
Thanks for all the tips and advice, I do keep the Ute in good nick but not afraid to sink the boot in when required so definitely worth having the basics covered
A cupple of hoses and some bushes is a good call on top of the other things listed , and will certainly have the fishing gear on board
Thanks again,

And hi TimNWVic
Certainly don't claim to be any sort of expert but if you at least have the spairs there but are not confident to change yourself, the chances are there will be someone in your convoy or the next one to pass you that will be willing and able to help you, (as long as you have a few cold ones on hand) if you dont have parts your options are limited,, genuine ones my cost the earth but a good aftermarket one to get you out of trouble is cheep insurance in my book
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
In well over 10 years of 4wding I could count the number of times I had to sink the boot in on one hand, nearly all on sand so really no chance of breaking anything. ( Note the words "had to"owning a V8 4wd does increase the want)
Smashing the skinny peddle is a choice not a requirement, therefore breaking stuff is easily avoided
 

Aye aye skipper

New Member
Hi disco matt
You are not wrong, and by the same logic if you drove the whole gibb river road at 3km an hour you would get no dust or need to strap things down,
But sometimes life is about calculated risks and unfortunately sometimes people get the equation wrong, I have been 4x4ing for over 20 years mostly in the Vic high country and have never not made it home under my own steam, in that time broken one Cv in an old well used 75 series Ute..

I am more in the mindset of hoping for the best preparing for the worst, and I know I will sleep better the night before doing the gunshot if I have a few get out of gaol free cards in the tool kit
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
Hi disco matt
You are not wrong, and by the same logic if you drove the whole gibb river road at 3km an hour you would get no dust or need to strap things down,
But sometimes life is about calculated risks and unfortunately sometimes people get the equation wrong, I have been 4x4ing for over 20 years mostly in the Vic high country and have never not made it home under my own steam, in that time broken one Cv in an old well used 75 series Ute..

I am more in the mindset of hoping for the best preparing for the worst, and I know I will sleep better the night before doing the gunshot if I have a few get out of gaol free cards in the tool kit
So if it will make you sleep better, take a complete CV kit, pre greased and vacuum sealed ready to slot in if the worst should happen.
Personally if I was concerned about a CV I would put the best I could buy in before the trip and not worry about it.
New components rarely fail, its old stressed parts that fail when pushed
 
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