Provent 200 catch can questions

cam04

Well-Known Member
is that something an average joe can use?
Im sure once you buy the contraption and the little dosing bottles of detergent and the correct adapters for your brand of car it would be a walk in the park after that. Not sure of the cost benefit though. I googled it, looks to be about $1500 worth? If you had a few cars to do you might think about it? There’s plenty of mobile carbon/egr guys who do this stuff now. They’d be more exxy than getting it done as part of a service though no doubt, and I’d assume triton14’s car had it done old fashioned where they physically remove the bits from the car and clean them which would be rather more expensive and possible more effective. I’ve never seen inside any of mine to corroborate that I’m not getting sold snake oil. The car doesn’t run any different once it’s done.
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
The Mazda dealer - zupps mt gravatt.
Our mobile mechanic also did it once on my ranger. It wasn’t expensive. Bypass a few lines, introduce detergent, run car for 1/2 hour, canister goes black. It’s not like it’s difficult.
View attachment 74434
If thats available to mechanics then why do the majority of them insist on taking the manifolds & throttle bodies etc off to clean the system when they can just use this.

The majority of the cost(that I paid) would have gone in labour removing & re installing parts!
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
If thats available to mechanics then why do the majority of them insist on taking the manifolds & throttle bodies etc off to clean the system when they can just use this.

The majority of the cost(that I paid) would have gone in labour removing & re installing parts!
I just pay the bills mate. They recommended it, I got it done. It was at about 30,000 kms so I choose to assume they are taking the stitch in time approach - otherwise i'll have to assume they are just value adding like putting nitrogen in tyres etc.
I literally bought a car for my kid last week and the first time I laid eyes on it was when I turned up to pay the bloke. The wife liked it and RACQ passed it so in them I trust. I am largely mechanically ignorant these days by choice.
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
If thats available to mechanics then why do the majority of them insist on taking the manifolds & throttle bodies etc off to clean the system when they can just use this.

The majority of the cost(that I paid) would have gone in labour removing & re installing parts!

I considered this method before i had mine physically done and a number of places tried to sell it to me. I decided against it because you have no idea of the current condition your manifold is in or what it looks like after the treatment
As you can see from my pics in the above post the treatment would of done sweet F all in my case. The other aspect is if it did remove the crud all that crap is going through the system :oops:
I see this product as a maintenance clean done on a regular basis to prevent buildup only.
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
Im sure once you buy the contraption and the little dosing bottles of detergent and the correct adapters for your brand of car it would be a walk in the park after that. Not sure of the cost benefit though. I googled it, looks to be about $1500 worth? If you had a few cars to do you might think about it? There’s plenty of mobile carbon/egr guys who do this stuff now. They’d be more exxy than getting it done as part of a service though no doubt, and I’d assume triton14’s car had it done old fashioned where they physically remove the bits from the car and clean them which would be rather more expensive and possible more effective. I’ve never seen inside any of mine to corroborate that I’m not getting sold snake oil. The car doesn’t run any different once it’s done.
Read this after my last post, yep think your 100% correct.

Get a 6 people together that own 4x4's & buy the motorvac & share it around when needed & you would save a heap of coin & even negate the need to fit a catch can all together.

But as @smitty_r51 is suggesting that manufacturers should fit a can from factory but I guess why they dont is then it will become a factory serviceable part.

Ive said it before in other threads that imo any 4x4(any diesel motor) not fitted with a catch can from factory is not fit for purpose because its a flaw in design even if the whole EGR system is to protect the environment
 
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hiluxxury

Active Member
Is anyone here an engineer with practical experience in this area?

IMO the aftermarket is taking the piss out of consumers. I too have seen dealers take photos of catch cans, even ones they fit themselves at the customers request.
 

phs

Well-Known Member
Everyone is cyber mechanical engineer here mate!

Yes the EGR defect cause the soot to build up in intakes increasing the velocity and the oils from blowby coats your cooler to catch all the dust that passes your cruiser filter!

oil misters are now the new preferred mod to save your cruiser from a Dustin
 

hiluxxury

Active Member
I know right!

Yeah I added one to my Range Rover - it solved all of its problems. I took the catch can out of my Ford Ranger and now the temperature gauge doesn't work and instrument cluster flickers at me.

I should add one of those aftermarket airboxes with a little pod filter next.
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
I know right!

Yeah I added one to my Range Rover - it solved all of its problems. I took the catch can out of my Ford Ranger and now the temperature gauge doesn't work and instrument cluster flickers at me.

I should add one of those aftermarket airboxes with a little pod filter next.
And seal the airbox and add a staino snorkel and ask why you car goes into limp mode every time it rains…
 

BonZa

Active Member
Is anyone here an engineer with practical experience in this area?

IMO the aftermarket is taking the piss out of consumers. I too have seen dealers take photos of catch cans, even ones they fit themselves at the customers request.
yes, I'm a mech engineer. but that means bugger all as all my experience work has been with industrial equipment, hydraulics and pneumatics, etc. installing, fixing and so on, working with and supervising fitters and machinists, boilies and the like.

but as far as automotive goes I'm confident doing all my own work and the above experience tells me that having a proper sized catch can properly fitted is the way to go. but I could be wrong. the only way to tell is pulling the intake apart after a 200,000 ks or so
 

Colly18

Well-Known Member
I'm fairly confident that there is enough evidence that with diesel engines from the past couple decades (common rail direct injection turbos), proving the combination of recirculating exhaust gases (EGR) through the intake manifold, when combined with crankcase ventilation blow-by oil vapour creates the 'vegemite' tar clogging up of the intake manifiolds + associated sensors, and this mess can extend into the cylinder head. How much this effects engine performance I've no idea, but I just don't like the idea of leaving it there. And if any of you think catch cans are just a marketing con, then I suggest do some research looking at the design of some diesel engines from the factory floor/manufacturer. I know that some Mercedes Benz designed engines from 15 years ago had a small catch can as part of the engine plumbing. It feed the collected oil back into the crankcase.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
Using Toyota as an example.

The car manufacturer researches, designs, and manufactures a vehicle. And in Australia give you a 7-year unlimited km warranty on the engine and drive train if you service it by the book. If the oil and sludge stuff up the motor, then you are covered.

Toyota believes that Catch cans can destroy a vehicle by back pressure and overflowing to the point where they will refuse a warranty on certain engine failures if you have one.

What on earth makes people think that they or some mechanic in a tin shed in country NSW knows more about what makes an engine work than the people who design and warranty it.

If your engine breaks in 7 years without a catch can, you are covered. But if you spend $1000 with some bush mechanic and get a failure you are setting yourself up for $30,000 of tears. You can of course take your chances in court but that could make it $50,000 of tears. They warn you BEFORE you put the catch can in that it can damage the engine and your warranty may not be valid.

Installing a catch can seems to be lose, lose, lose, lose to me.

Lose - there is as much evidence that it is harmful, as there is that it's useful
Lose - You expose yourself to no warranty if it causes a problem
Lose - the manufacturer says it is harmful ( why would they say that BEFORE a warranty claim)
Lose - The manufacturer can blame your catch can for other non-related engine faults and you at at the mercy of lawyers.




https://www.maroochydore.kenmillsto...ing-a-catch-can-void-my-toyota-warranty/3653/
 

BonZa

Active Member
Toyota with all their research, engineers and manufacturing acumen didnt get DPF's right. end result class action forced Toyota to do updates in later models as they hadnt figured urban driving correctly.

all was initially mentioned by Berrima Diesel and Toyota didnt treat them too kindly

then of course there is the sneaky German auto makers and their diesel gate affair

but I didnt start this thread 4.5 years ago to convince others to install a catch can. it was started with a question about a specific catch can, Provent 200
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
Using Toyota as an example.

The car manufacturer researches, designs, and manufactures a vehicle. And in Australia give you a 7-year unlimited km warranty on the engine and drive train if you service it by the book. If the oil and sludge stuff up the motor, then you are covered.

Toyota believes that Catch cans can destroy a vehicle by back pressure and overflowing to the point where they will refuse a warranty on certain engine failures if you have one.

What on earth makes people think that they or some mechanic in a tin shed in country NSW knows more about what makes an engine work than the people who design and warranty it.

If your engine breaks in 7 years without a catch can, you are covered. But if you spend $1000 with some bush mechanic and get a failure you are setting yourself up for $30,000 of tears. You can of course take your chances in court but that could make it $50,000 of tears. They warn you BEFORE you put the catch can in that it can damage the engine and your warranty may not be valid.

Installing a catch can seems to be lose, lose, lose, lose to me.

Lose - there is as much evidence that it is harmful, as there is that it's useful
Lose - You expose yourself to no warranty if it causes a problem
Lose - the manufacturer says it is harmful ( why would they say that BEFORE a warranty claim)
Lose - The manufacturer can blame your catch can for other non-related engine faults and you at at the mercy of lawyers.




https://www.maroochydore.kenmillsto...ing-a-catch-can-void-my-toyota-warranty/3653/

Whilst that is all 100% true there is no disputing it is an issue just the same. Mine looked pretty ordinary and my son’s girlfriends Prado was that choked up it became undrivable
 

Batts88

Well-Known Member
Just my opinion if you update your car every couple of years or so I wouldn't spend the money on one as you'll probably see no real benefit. But if your keeping it say 5yrs plus for example yes worth fitting one and it will most probably save you money. I just drained around 60mls after 10,000km off my 2007 BT50 with 245,000 on the clock. It had one fitted early on in its life before the intake started to gum up and was still under warranty.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
but I didnt start this thread 4.5 years ago to convince others to install a catch can. it was started with a question about a specific catch can, Provent 200
Good point, but this is 4x4 Earth. You shouldn't confuse the OP question with the contents of a thread, unfortunately. I'm surprised it's still about Catch cans after 4 1/2 years TBH.

:rolleyes:
 

Komang

Well-Known Member
It actually not really new the catch can. Around 10+yrs ago I already install Greddy in my old corrolla, got tech by drag mech to keep clean the intake /injector
 

hiluxxury

Active Member
Good point, but this is 4x4 Earth. You shouldn't confuse the OP question with the contents of a thread, unfortunately. I'm surprised it's still about Catch cans after 4 1/2 years TBH.

:rolleyes:
Too true :)

My view is just clean intake every 100,000kms or so if you are hanging on to the vehicle for that long. Its not a hard job in these small diesels. If you own a ford, you can probably do is as a quick side job while you're fixing any number of other issues under the bonnet.

If you're flipping cars on a regular basis, don't worry about the catch can or the intake maintenance.
 

phs

Well-Known Member
Using Toyota as an example.

The car manufacturer researches, designs, and manufactures a vehicle. And in Australia give you a 7-year unlimited km warranty on the engine and drive train if you service it by the book. If the oil and sludge stuff up the motor, then you are covered.

Toyota believes that Catch cans can destroy a vehicle by back pressure and overflowing to the point where they will refuse a warranty on certain engine failures if you have one.

What on earth makes people think that they or some mechanic in a tin shed in country NSW knows more about what makes an engine work than the people who design and warranty it.

If your engine breaks in 7 years without a catch can, you are covered. But if you spend $1000 with some bush mechanic and get a failure you are setting yourself up for $30,000 of tears. You can of course take your chances in court but that could make it $50,000 of tears. They warn you BEFORE you put the catch can in that it can damage the engine and your warranty may not be valid.

Installing a catch can seems to be lose, lose, lose, lose to me.

Lose - there is as much evidence that it is harmful, as there is that it's useful
Lose - You expose yourself to no warranty if it causes a problem
Lose - the manufacturer says it is harmful ( why would they say that BEFORE a warranty claim)
Lose - The manufacturer can blame your catch can for other non-related engine faults and you at at the mercy of lawyers.




https://www.maroochydore.kenmillsto...ing-a-catch-can-void-my-toyota-warranty/3653/

Not here to argue for or against the catch can saga as there is certainly 2 sides to that storey and both have points

but Toyota have made and stand by some rubbish engineering decisions. Landcruiser panel filter Airboxs is top of the list!!! There is no 2 sides to that discussion, and even now the 300 has the same rubbish setup

Followed close by second with there DPF saga
 
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