Pajero ng outback possibilities

Outbackbill

New Member
I've recently aquired a one owner 1990 pajero-- v6-- in very neat condition. Its a sweet car, totally standard. The motor has recently been reconditioned and everything works well, including the automatic transmission. Totally dry underneath.
I'd like to do a big trip through the outback from Brisbane to the centre, and up the Tanami track to the Gibb River Rd. I've worked in the outback and driven off road vehicles for some years, and know the country.
I'm not in a hurry and can "nurse "the lovely old car along ( I'm retired and have lots of time).
Would there be any advice out on particular parts that may be vulnerable on these cars. I love driving the car-- it's my happy place. I've been advised to swap it for a Prado ( late 90's) for reliability etc.. I've driven them but find them to be bland in the cabin and somewhat soulless. Am I dreaming.. can a well loved 30year old car be an option with proper car and attention. I don't have the money to do many mods, but I'll put a set of good tyres on it-- Bridgestones Duellers probably.
Any input is welcome.
Cheers, Outbackbill
 

Les PK Ranger

4x4 Earth Contributer
Auto, that's nice, had an '88 was manual, but loved it.

As mentioned in the other thread, check your fuel tank bash plate, for little stones etc between that and the tank.
Corros will cause wear, and has been known to cause tanks to eventually fail.
I cleaned mine out and put some thin rubber sheet between to stop any further stone ingress through the bash plate drain holes.
Page 2 post 29 . . . I thought I used foam, but looking at my pics there just realised I used shade cloth sikafexed in between.

Mine was a mates previously, he did a Simmo trip with us, on the way home I was driving behind him and noticed his lh shocker lin through the bottom of his shocker.
I'd fit new quality shocks for a trip like that.

Enjoy Bill, they are a great bus, does yours have the suspension seats ?
Possibly the best ride in any 4WD out there, but the BACK seat is horrendously uncomfortable.
 

Colly18

Well-Known Member
I've recently aquired a one owner 1990 pajero-- v6-- in very neat condition. Its a sweet car, ................................ can a well loved 30year old car be an option with proper car and attention.................. but I'll put a set of good tyres on it-- Bridgestones Duellers probably.
Any input is welcome.
Cheers, Outbackbill
Welcome! Lucky you Bill on acquiring a well kept 1990 vehcile.
I assume you are also checking in with a dedicated Pajero forum with your queries.
I.M.O. you will do OK in the Pajero if you take all the normal precautions one should, even with a new vehicle. Such as, if you don't feel confident, have it checked out by a trusted mechanic pre journey (servicing and roadworthiness for the planned journey); carry usual spares (tyres, belts, radiator hoses, fluids, whatever else?); carry a reasonable selection of tools and recovery gear; carry emergency communications if you plan on deviating from well used roads/routes; etc.
Like Les suggests the Tanami Track is recognised for bad corrugations, depending on when the graders last went through, so lowering tyre pressures and slowing down a little should assist (but if you know the outback, you will know this).
For me it is more about vehicle preparation and driving to conditions rather than what vehicle you drive. I remember fondly (back in 1988) driving into Windjana Gorge in a 1976 Holden Kingswood towing an old 13x7 Ambassador caravan, after travelling part of a very corrugated Gibb River Road to get there, and being confronted with only 4WD's with off road trailers/camper owners wondering how the hell I got there? :)
 

Chatty

Well-Known Member
I had the same model bought new years ago and I always regretted selling it for a Landcruiser.
The only things I can remember are the usual pphoses and belt. Spare fuel filter as you're likely to shake up any crap in the tank.
Check the rubber fuel lines - if bio (alcohol) fuel has been used at any stage it will have damaged the rubber.
As Les said, check the fuel tank and bash plate.

I would definitely replace the shocks/struts and would think seriously about replacing the springs.
 

Hoyks

Well-Known Member
Springs, shocks and tyres are probably my tip.

If the springs aren't up to the load, then the shocks will have to work harder to stop everything wallowing around, will get hot and be more likely fail. New springs can give you some bonus ground clearance too.

Old tyres are more likely to fail due to perishing, getting hard or just having less tread to protect themselves. Although I've had 2 tyres fail due to side wall damage with less than 500km on them.

Cooling system hoses are much easier to replace at home, rather than carrying the brand new ones as spares, same too for rubber exhaust hangers. Other than that, give it a service, replace anything that looks a bit suss and it should be fine.
 

Outbackbill

New Member
Springs, shocks and tyres are probably my tip.

If the springs aren't up to the load, then the shocks will have to work harder to stop everything wallowing around, will get hot and be more likely fail. New springs can give you some bonus ground clearance too.

Old tyres are more likely to fail due to perishing, getting hard or just having less tread to protect themselves. Although I've had 2 tyres fail due to side wall damage with less than 500km on them.

Cooling system hoses are much easier to replace at home, rather than carrying the brand new ones as spares, same too for rubber exhaust hangers. Other than that, give it a service, replace anything that looks a bit suss and it should be fine.
Thanks for your advice Chatty, it is really just common sense hey. Am not sure if I can afford all of these things, but it's in such good condition that I'll have my mechanic check everything and give me his advice on what to replace. The car has never been off road, is as clean and tight as can be. I've just paid 8k for it, when the original owner passed away at the age of 96. He loved the car.. Cheers, Bill
 

Outbackbill

New Member
Springs, shocks and tyres are probably my tip.

If the springs aren't up to the load, then the shocks will have to work harder to stop everything wallowing around, will get hot and be more likely fail. New springs can give you some bonus ground clearance too.

Old tyres are more likely to fail due to perishing, getting hard or just having less tread to protect themselves. Although I've had 2 tyres fail due to side wall damage with less than 500km on them.

Cooling system hoses are much easier to replace at home, rather than carrying the brand new ones as spares, same too for rubber exhaust hangers. Other than that, give it a service, replace anything that looks a bit suss and it should be fine.
Sorry Hoyks, I replied to Chatty rather than you. Yes, I appreciate your help, and as I said, it's pretty much common sense.
I've been told by a few mechanics to get a Prado for the job, as they are so much more reliable and capable.. but I love the comfort of the spring seats, the ambience of the cabin, and the way it drives. The Prado is smooth and solid, but is bland and somewhat soulless, and so very common ( for good reason I have to admit..) At the age of 67 I'm still a bit of a dreamer-- but don't really want to get into a mess out on the Tanami or Gibb River Rd.
Cheers again.
 

Outbackbill

New Member
Auto, that's nice, had an '88 was manual, but loved it.

As mentioned in the other thread, check your fuel tank bash plate, for little stones etc between that and the tank.
Corros will cause wear, and has been known to cause tanks to eventually fail.
I cleaned mine out and put some thin rubber sheet between to stop any further stone ingress through the bash plate drain holes.
Page 2 post 29 . . . I thought I used foam, but looking at my pics there just realised I used shade cloth sikafexed in between.

Mine was a mates previously, he did a Simmo trip with us, on the way home I was driving behind him and noticed his lh shocker lin through the bottom of his shocker.
I'd fit new quality shocks for a trip like that.

Enjoy Bill, they are a great bus, does yours have the suspension seats ?
Possibly the best ride in any 4WD out there, but the BACK seat is horrendously uncomfortable.
Yes, mine has the suspension seats, and they are indeed the most comfortable seats in pretty much any car. one big reason to keep it..
 

2luxes

Well-Known Member
I'm not in a hurry and can "nurse "the lovely old car along ( I'm retired and have lots of time).


If every tourist did that, the Outback car repair workshops would go broke. Excessive weight and speed has broken countless cars in those conditions. You have definitely got the right idea.


Am I dreaming.. can a well loved 30year old car be an option with proper car and attention.
Yes it can. If it is in good condition, you should not have any problems.

Have you had any experience with puncture repairs? The temporary externally applied plug kits can get you out of trouble most of the time but they can not always be relied upon to fix everything.

Have a look at the tyre section in this site.
 

megamung

Active Member
drove this old girl (1974) in 1992 from Brisbane to Birds Ville and back. I was in my mid 20's had just quit a very high pressure job that had me working 60 + hours a week for the last few years. traded my less than 12 month old Subaru on this to clear all my debt and decided to go on an adventure.
Threw an esky, a foam mattress and my sleeping bag in the back and hit the road. best 5 weeks of my life. broke down three times, rebuilt the carby on the side of the highway, drove the last 300k with no alternator (seized), got food poisoning and robbed on the way home (car had no door locks).
wouldn't change a thing.



708F02DA-14CD-4DD4-905A-E7ED9DD639A9.JPG
 
Last edited:

Les PK Ranger

4x4 Earth Contributer
The front torsion bars are pretty heavy duty, you can wind them up a little if needed, but generally the clearance is ok for such touring.

Rear springs if sagging, yeah some decent HD ones wouldn't hurt if the budget can stretch.
I bought my leaf packs for the old Ranger from https://ssa.com.au/ up in Brissy, awesome they were, left the old upgrade ones for dead.
Not sure if they do them for the older Pajeros, but can always ask.

Good tip re tyres pressures and corros, drop a little (maybe 25 or so), slow down, the find your best speed to 'skim' them as best possible.
Sometimes that helps, other times they are just bad at any speed / any tyre pressure.

Good new HD shocks that can take some punishment would be worth the cost from the outset.
 
Top