Off road licence endorsements

boobook

Well-Known Member
So far no one knows the definition - clearly.

Making up your own definition won't cut it in court if you have an accident and dispute with the insurance company.

TBH I was hoping someone would know the definition, not opinions on what the law might be in their view.
:)

Does anyone KNOW the definition? Not just a quick google from the first US website that appears on the top line of the search results? I did a google search and saw that site was useless a week ago. My research is a little better than taking the first result on google as a fact.
 
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mikehzz

Well-Known Member
You're covered anywhere you're legally allowed to be, just as @Albynsw said. Otherwise you wouldn't be covered in places like your back yard if a tree fell on you or in a multistory car park if you have a bingle, and a million other scenarios. They aren't gazetted roads. The gazetted roads thing mainly applies to recovery options if you break down.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
You're covered anywhere you're legally allowed to be, just as @Albynsw said. Otherwise you wouldn't be covered in places like your back yard if a tree fell on you or in a multistory car park if you have a bingle, and a million other scenarios. They aren't gazetted roads. The gazetted roads thing mainly applies to recovery options if you break down.
I don't think that captures it fully either. I am legally allowed to cross a river or floods, but not covered in some circumstances.

I'm simply trying to understand if someone can point to the facts here.
 

mikehzz

Well-Known Member
I don't think that captures it fully either. I am legally allowed to cross a river or floods, but not covered in some circumstances.

I'm simply trying to understand if someone can point to the facts here.
I only have vanilla comprehensive insurance and was covered slipping off a powerline track at Lithgow into a tree that took out a mudguard and my mirror. I was honest with them and there wasn't an issue.
 
That is not an Aussie site so interpretation may be different?
Personally I don’t use insurance companies that have that definition but rather run with “ you are covered anywhere in Australia that you are legally allowed to be”
This is the definition I was given by Club 4x4 when I pushed them on exactly where I was covered by their insurance policies. Essentially, so long as you're legally able to drive on the road/track you are covered.
 

peterfermtech

Well-Known Member
You're covered anywhere you're legally allowed to be, just as @Albynsw said. Otherwise you wouldn't be covered in places like your back yard if a tree fell on you or in a multistory car park if you have a bingle, and a million other scenarios. They aren't gazetted roads. The gazetted roads thing mainly applies to recovery options if you break down.
Many bush tracks wander off the road reserve and on to private property.
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
Does anyone KNOW the definition? Not just a quick google from the first US website that appears on the top line of the search results? I did a google search and saw that site was useless a week ago. My research is a little better than taking the first result on google as a fact.
So you researched for a week and still couldn't work out what gazetted means then came to a 4wd forum that you constantly bag for people not knowing what they are on about and threads going off topic.
You asked for a definition of a gazetted road....
It is a road named or maintained by council or that is on maps
lol
My insurance companies always state I am covered anywhere I am legally allowed to drive , I would not use a company that stated anything different than legal access....
 

RBJET

Well-Known Member
When I questioned Shannon's about this they stated that the only place I wasn't covered was Landcruiser Park.
I guess it's the same scenario as racing. As soon as you enter a race track you're not covered by insurance.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
So you researched for a week and still couldn't work out what gazetted means then came to a 4wd forum that you constantly bag for people not knowing what they are on about and threads going off topic.
You asked for a definition of a gazetted road....
It is a road named or maintained by council or that is on maps
lol
My insurance companies always state I am covered anywhere I am legally allowed to drive , I would not use a company that stated anything different than legal access....

For the record, I love 4x4 Earth, and think most people are very knowledgeable and balanced. Not all, but that is the situation with most settings.

I am hoping to get to the bottom of the definition of Gazetted Road and am not looking for condescending remarks, get quick google search results or guesses which I know are not correct.

That's all. Is that a problem?
 
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dabbler

Active Member
I've encountered many instances of vehicles being used dangerously, inappropriately or incorrectly and simply because the driver didn't know the features or capabilities of that particular vehicle and how they might make the drive safer and easier. No licence endorsement will fully resolve that issue.

As a young 20 something, my then boss got our brand new company HJ45 bogged at a virgin bush site where we gathering soil samples (Try telling your boss that high revs don't give traction.).

I'd rather authorities invest time, effort and dollars into "inspection" points at the entry to high risk areas (they're aren't that many really) and offer a short Q&A session or advice to drivers and passengers. QPOL already do this on major highways at times, stopping all vehicles that are traveling, mostly just chatting to occupants and obviously subtly checking for signs of infringements. Sometimes they break out scales and check weights.

Of course, in the case of rental vehicles (which have a sad history of their own) then rental companies need accountability forced on them. They certainly wouldn't be happy with a licens endorsement requirement.
 

nitrobrent

Well-Known Member
For the record, I love 4x4 Earth, and think most people are very knowledgeable and balanced. Not all, but that is the situation with most settings.

I am hoping to get to the bottom of the definition of Gazetted Road and am not looking for condescending remarks, get quick google search results or guesses which I know are not correct.

That's all. Is that a problem?
Dont really think your insurance company is going to be interested in what Fluffykitten 5 on 4x4 Earth thinks the definition is
 

Kippie

Moderator
The legal term "gazetted" means that it has been published in the government Gazette, which is a recording of the legal notices of the various branches of government. For example, if a bill is passed, then its commencement will be published in the Gazette. Each government, state + federal have their Gazette.

This link is for the Federal government Gazette.

Designation of road reserves are incorporated in planning schemes as part of the relevant legislation.
 

Mick_Marsh

Active Member
gazette
/ɡəˈzɛt/
verb
past tense: gazetted; past participle: gazetted
1.
announce or publish (something) in an official gazette.


road
/rəʊd/
noun
noun: road; plural noun: roads; plural noun: Roads

1.
a wide way leading from one place to another, especially one with a specially prepared surface which vehicles can use.

GAZETTED ROADS

Gazetted roads or tracks are those listed on maps and considered to be public thoroughfare. Under the Roads Act 1993, Gazetted roads cover roads that the Roads Authority (the artist formally known as the RTA…) are responsible for the managing, including those roads or tracks that travel through National Parks or State Forests.
 

Mick_Marsh

Active Member
Federal governments, state governments and local councils all gazette roads of their responsibility.
To find out if a road is gazetted, you will need to go through the relevant authority's documentation.
This may help to start you on your search:
 

Attachments

  • Register of Public Roads - Part A v 2015.pdf
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