No wonder tracks get closed to everyone

discomatt

Well-Known Member
I understand that boys will be boys and we all need to have some fun, this is one of my favorite tracks at Toolangi but only ever go there when its dry, well its never totally dry but to go there after a heap of rain and do this is just asking for gates to go up and stay shut
 

RBJET

Well-Known Member
It's also my favorite track in Toolangi but only when it's wet. It's quite bland in the dry.
I understand driving in that manner doesn't do wonders for the track but there isn't many more options for getting up without winching all day.
 

itlldoo

Well-Known Member
no true play grounds left for them, they close all the old quarries and mines sites which are perfect for this type of play, same at Stockton beach they herd us all into a small area then complain about the amount of damage to that area. if you have a bitumen runner you can test it anywhere just look at all the 11s you see on low traffic roads those roads don't get closed. we spin wheels in the mud and we are vandals ruining everything. gives me the shi7s these guys were not cutting down vegetation to fill mud hole like i have seen in other places or large bore drills being towed throu our state forests with dozers with little or no care to the environment, leaving oil drums and bits of machinery behind cause they are to lazy to take out their rubbish. @g-ute no mechanical sympathy at all, but that changes over time
 

G_ute

Well-Known Member
Yeah, I must admit in the scheme of things its very little damage to the environment.
People need to get up in a plane and look down, and see what a tiny proportion of the bush is being 'damaged'
Look at aerial photos of Fraser Island and the tracks which everyone complains about - you can hardly see them.
Land clearing (mining, farming, highways, housing, etc) does far, far more damage.
As does nature itself with storms and the future climate changes coming (helped by burning fossil fuels in the name of fun of course)
 

ipch

Member
I see a lot of Green P Plate mentality lately. Although the guys in this video seem to be well prepared and well funded, a lot of them are not.
limited experience, driving too fast and cutting corners make them dangerous on the road. After being out on the last 3 weekends I have seen rollovers busted cars and had near misses from drivers with green p plates.

I know this doesn't apply to everyone but that age mentality seems to be a problem.
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
When you look at the tree clearing 5 minutes from that track there is no grounds for the environmental damage arguments at all, that wasn't my point or issue, neither is going out and driving a muddy track, I have driven that track numerous times and it is never really dry and always slippery.
My issue is the obviously illegal cars been driven flat out which is no different to the boys going to skid meets then post it for an ego trip trying to get some glorification and heroism from there piers which is nothing but motivation and cause for certain groups to push harder and get the place closed down altogether. Which will happen
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
A lot of that rev limiter stuff is just for effect in low range and entirely useless but makes good video. Kids think they have to drive like that because YouTube. Like old mate driving to help the winch and nearly ending up in a worse position. A lot of very poor ‘technique’ is perpetuated by ‘experts’ who want to produce content and kids like those believe them. Some nice soft suspension on the GQ’s though and especially that cut down 80. I am not without sin so I must recuse myself from passing judgement. As a young bloke I couldn’t wait for rain days.
 
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2luxes

Well-Known Member
I understand driving in that manner doesn't do wonders for the track but there isn't many more options for getting up without winching all day.
There could be a much better way if all car modifications went a little further. The vast majority of them have lifts, lockers and big muddies but still have standard gear ratios. To make matters worse, the big tyres have raised the axle ratios.

I have only tried modifying one 4x4 and that was back in the 1970s. Unfortunatly I had to sell it when it was almost finished because we had to suddenly sell our house and move 500ks away to an area where we had no use for it.

It was a 1960s International Scout. I replaced its four cylinder engine with a 250 cross flow Falcon and a New Process 435 gear box adapted to the Scout's Spicer 18 transfer case. The rear axle was a narrowed 9 inch Ford. Front brakes were Falcon discs. Wheels were F 100 with 7.50 x 16 tyres.

The springs were reset originals but those tyres lifted it about 2 inches.

The NP 435 box was made by Chrysler but used by Chev, Ford and Dodge. The Ford version had a 6.69 to 1 first gear ratio. Reverse was 8.26. When combined with the 4.27 diffs and 2.46 in the transfer case, first gear low range was 72.47 to 1 and 86.76 in reverse.

Aftermarket gears in the transfer case would have made it even lower.

Land Cruisers and Land Rover's at that time had a first low ratio of around 40 to 1.

With a first gear ratio like that and the high torque at low revs coming from the Falcon, the old Scout would have had a very good chance of slowly climbing those muddy hills without loosing traction. Track damage would be next to nothing.

The big problem with so many of the current crop of 4x4 cars is they don't have low enough gearing to climb steep hills without a bit of speed. The tyres are then turning too fast to maintain traction so the track gets ripped up.

There is still a lot of information and parts on the net for the 435 box and 18 t/case if anyone is interested.
.
 

RBJET

Well-Known Member
No offence mate but have you driven cockpit track?
When it's wet you can barely keep the car in a straight line coming down hill.

I don't think lower gears are going to help driving up it.
 

Petunia

Well-Known Member
Environmental damage? Here I have my own 160acre private 4x4 park plus gated access to another 500? private acres.

I try not to drive the same line too often, wheel tracks erode, water runs off, pollutes/silts water storage. Dam[n]it, I can agree with the little environment damage bits, but also have seen wheel ruts here form tank traps in good seasons.

I was young once, It took me 20 years to save $100 to buy an engine, and another hundred to buy a car that suited that engine, from under a tree. I then went as fast as I liked on the purpose built track. The need for speed was quenched.
 

Jackolux

Well-Known Member
It's also my favorite track in Toolangi but only when it's wet. It's quite bland in the dry.
I understand driving in that manner doesn't do wonders for the track but there isn't many more options for getting up without winching all day.
I just wouldn't drive that track when its like that , I would just go somewhere else . I would probably fit chains if I was confronted by a track like that and couldn't avoid it , turn around or whatever .
 

old parthy

Active Member
I have seen many of the video's that group have put up, and yes they seem to not care about the tracks and or there cars...
I have withdrawn from trips that would have me digging up WET tracks.. I for myself don't see the point of ripping up trails and putting my car under pressure to the point of it braking.
Sorry just the way i feel... these guys have 35" tyre;s and once they go though ... what chance is there for us when we have 31 or even 33's...
Yes it is fun in the wet.. but that's when you play on someone's fram..
 

phs

Well-Known Member
All P Platers running 37” bias tyres
The street hoon laws have pushed them into the bush,

they actually don’t seem like bad people just young.

Hopefully they keep there huge tyres and foot to floor tactics away from the touring HC tracks

quite like running road legal tyres and being able to drive tracks

 
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2luxes

Well-Known Member
No offence mate but have you driven cockpit track?
When it's wet you can barely keep the car in a straight line coming down hill.

I don't think lower gears are going to help driving up it.
No car is going to get up any hill in any conditions, particularly street legal ones. Lower gear ratios will make a difference though in many situations.

The DVD that was on this site recently that showed a car roaring up a steep dry hill then getting stuck and rolling back down is a good example.

Many drivers have come unstruck on steep rough hills that their car can drive up providing they have enough time to choose the safest path. The lack of a very low first gear often has them going far too fast to do it.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
The only differences between them and me 45 years ago are

I had a Landrover 108 series 3. It couldn't pull the skin off a banana.
I couldn't afford a power winch and only had a Turfor. You choose very carefully what you get yourself into so you don't have to spend hours winching out.
I could not afford nice new mud tyres. mine were worn to the hilt.
Most importantly There was no one to film our antics and post it for the world to see, and
No one made judgements around what you did to the tracks.

Apart from that, I seem to recall having that much fun in the old days. Until you got home and checked the damage the next morning.

I love that area, it's a honey pot for young guys that rip up the tracks, and leaves tracks further from Melbourne for camping and some considered 4wding. I can see it turning into the Otways though. Every track locked.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
That is impressive but too bad if anyone else ever wants to use those tracks. LOLthe chains really do rip into tracks. I see the patrol following much of the way. It would be interesting to see how it went. Presumably, it had muddies.
 

G_ute

Well-Known Member
The chains seem to break up and loosen the dirt, like harrows. Dumping it back into the holes. In that particular terrain anyway.
We all like big boys toys but a Unimog has its limitations. They were orginally designed for farming (and were smaller)
I remember as a kid my dad brought home Unimog brochures from work and I was fascinated with all the different roles it could perform, snow plow, firetruck, drilling rig, mower, etc.
 
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