New vs Old vehicles - your choice and why?

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
So earlier in the week I watched this video:
Got me thinking, whats your preference in vehicles, old or new and why? An I guess everyone's interpretation of old is different as well. To me an older vehicle is something over 10yrs old.
For me I just cant see the value or point in spending the $$$ on a new vehicle.. For the purchase price of a 7 seat wagon (because I need to seat 4 kids)or even any of the cheaper dual cab utes I'd need to take out a loan of some type, so thats an ongoing cost of ownership for me. I'd much rather buy something that's under $25,000 that I don't need a loan to get into. My current Discovery 3 is not the cheapest vehicle to maintain (directly compared to my old 80 series land cruiser anyway), however I still spend on average less on maintenance per year than what a $30,000 7 yr loan would cost me (including the failed auto transmission a few years ago). I also like to do my own maintenance on my vehicles which is something I wouldn't be able to do with a vehicle that's still within new car warranty periods. Purely financially I feel I get a better deal in an older car. I generally don't take resale into consideration as generally dont plan on selling my cars. I actually havent sold a 4wd I've owned ever, they've just been written off due to accidents:rolleyes:.
Probably the biggest thing to me however is not being a new car I'm not so worried about scratching up the paintwork offroad or minor dings/dents imperfections etc... that can and do occur when you use a 4wd as a 4wd.
 
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Deleted member 69390

Guest
All depends on personal preference - oldest is 1957, newest is 2007. Newest is most capable, comfortable and fuel efficient and for me not a lot more to maintain because I do all the easy stuff my self.

However what is true for me - I would never buy a brand new vehicle, no matter the brand - lots of savings to be made with few deficiencies in buying a low km near new vehicle - doesnt matter if it is a Toyota or a Sanyong or Great Wall, you loose a lot of value in the first year and a wise shopper will always find that near new bargain.
 

typhoeus

Well-Known Member
Well, im not the leyland brothers or Shaun from 4wdaction and I'm not going to the cape every other month, so I don't need every bell and whistle. So an older car suits me . I can fix it myself, minimal electrical crap to go wrong, it can be made as capable as i will need. And wont cost half a house deposit. So my 1998 hilux will do me. Might not be fast or pretty, but thats what the bike is for when i feel like fast. . Which is less these days than when I was younger. I can't see the point in buying the latest brand new, let someone else pay for the depreciation. . . So I think I'm on the same page as shanegtr above
 

mikehzz

Well-Known Member
Fuel economy is an important factor for me as I tend to do a lot of kilometres. The problem with old cars is the fuel economy is not good. I want sub 10 litres per 100 or I'm not interested. Back before the 2000's I solved the problem by having 4 LPG dual fuel 4wds but LPG's too dear now and getting scarcer.
 

McGinnis

Active Member
Old. Can't stand new cars, they just irritate me in every way.

Door open? Beep. Key in ignition? Beep. Something to the side, front, or rear? Beeep. Lights on? Bag on the passenger seat? Seatbelt off?

You can't even turn the lights fully off anymore. Honestly, I just want my vehicle to leave me alone and do as it's told.

I have to drive new vehicles for work and I just hate every single one of them. Fords and VWs seem to be the worst offenders when it comes to useless obnoxious shit like the "shift gear now" light.
 
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CaptainBanana

Well-Known Member
Old. Can't stand new cars, they just irritate me in every way.

Door open? Beep. Key in ignition? Beep. Something to the side, front, or rear? Beeep. Lights on? Bag on the passenger seat? Seatbelt off?

You can't even turn the lights fully off anymore. Honestly, I just want my vehicle to leave me alone and do as it's told.

I have to drive new vehicles for work and I just hate every single one of them. Fords and VWs seem to be the worst offenders when it comes to useless obnoxious shit like the "shift gear now" light.

I dont hate all the beeps and buzzers and daytime running lights all doing their best to stop be and my passengers being killed :rolleyes:
 

typhoeus

Well-Known Member
Unfortunately, all those "convenience" lights and bells seem to only serve to make drivers dumber. People learn to rely on the machine instead of their own eyes and brain. Eventually it will be" it's not my fault that happened, the car didn't tell me blah blah blah" and the responsebility gets shiftedaway from the driverwho should have used their brains
 

dirvine

Well-Known Member
Whilst I wont get into an arguement Old v New, or even Cheap v Expensive, I constantly find the arguement that I would never buy brand new as you loose so much value in the 1st year etc as a rubbish comment. The purchase price is as accountants call it a "sunk cost". Either you can afford the purchase price of the item (either new or old) or you cannot. Once paid you generally you cannot get it back. If you buy a Toyoto just because it will give you a better sale price down the track, then you are dismissing all the features that a Toyota may lack that YOU want just because of price. (maybe they suit all what you want, but they did not for me). If we take this idea further, I guess you buy a 2nd hand fridge, washing machine, lounge suite, motor mower because I am sure they are cheaper 2nd hand (or shop soiled) than brand new. I buy new for the following reasons. I know that I get a warranty and I know how I treat my car. I choose the options and colours I want. I know its history and so have a fair idea what needs to be fixed or looked at before I go on any long trip. I dont have to worry when it was serviced (or indeed has it ever been serviced) as I arrange it from new. I have sold many shonky (fabricated service record) cars in my time. (bad boy) I know my LR has lost some value since new, however in my case until the new Defender proves itself (or not), the D4 is holding its value well, due to its boxy shape for fitting stuff in, plus the reliability that Tata Motors have been able to instill in this car compared with when it was a British, German or American owned company. Also the idea that old cars are easy to fix and cheaper to fix, I would venture tom say newer cars despite all the electronics, are far more reliable, more comfortable, easier to drive, have more features and creature comforts than older models. At the time I bought my D4 I also bought a 76 wagon with air and an auto box fitted. Thinking the Toyota would be the tow/ tourer and the D4 the daily drive with some off road. One trip in the 76 towing a van and some off road 4wding quickly made me realise how far vehicles have come from the 1980's. Son now has the Toyota as he is a Tojo tragic. I am sure he will have spine issues in the future!! Having said all this, I guess you can get lucky and find the one car 2nd hand that fits you like a glove. I have yet to find such a vehicle in the past so now but brand new. I am sure others will disagree with my views, and they are entitled to do what they think is best for them in their circumstances.
 

smitty_r51

Well-Known Member
I always said I would never buy new because of the loss as soon as you drive it from the forecourt. This comes from a UK background when a new car loses 18% Vat as soon as you buy it and then 10% just for being second hand.

I have now bought two new.

First up I have had some lemons second hand.. Nobody sells a car because it is perfect, there is always some reason to get rid of it.

Second car is so new you can't buy them second hand and given the car I wouldn't trust the way people will have treated one as it is a 2 seater sports car.

Third up compare your finance rates on a new car against one just 5 years old... Suddenly makes it more expensive to buy in interest over the same period.

Finally I know the complete history of both new vehicles, how they have seen driven, what has gone wrong, who has worked on it... Bit more piece of mind.



One (new car) is now ten years old and I will keep it another 10 at least. You only lose the value on purchasing brand new if you are chopping and changing every 3 years
 
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discomatt

Well-Known Member
I wouldn't buy brand new and kit it out, the D4 was 3 years old with 24k worth of bolt on bits was 40k cheaper than the original owner forked out, that's a lot of diesel ...
I love the D4, stupid comfortable, I can easily drive 1000km in a day, cant do that in the D1, really capable, economical and safe.
Despite all that I also love the 25 year old D1, tough, reliable easy and cheap to fix and I don't care if I biff it doing hard 4wding, I would have a fair sook if I damaged the D4 4wding.
So for me 1 new and love it plus 1 old and love it, best of both worlds
 

sharkcaver

Well-Known Member
As vehicles get newer, they tend to gain the bits you had to pay extra for in the older models for nix. They also come with additional safety features. I for one would have thought after your drama with the 80, a more modern vehicle with additional safety features such as stab control would be high on your list. It maybe???

I agree with others, some of the newer features are just crap to me and increase the chance of failure and maintenance. Auto lights/rain sensing wipers etc. I wouldn't be paying extra for that rubbish if I had a choice.

As a general rule, newer cars are more reliable than older ones. The newer electronics and fuel systems dont help that cause though. That said, I wouldn't want a +10 Year vehicle these days, cause I often travel remote and solo at times. Reliability is important to me. That's not to say Murphy cant rock up unannounced at any time, but the chance of seeing him with an under 10 year old vehicle is less IMO. But you have to pay and there is no guarantee with it. I wouldn't buy any car for the misguided belief warranty will look after you.
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
I for one would have thought after your drama with the 80, a more modern vehicle with additional safety features such as stab control would be high on your list. It maybe???
Dead right, stability control is important to me. Which is one of the reasons why I didnt get another 80 and ended up with the Disco. While the disco is a modern(ish) vehicle now, its now 15yrs old.
 

silkwood

Well-Known Member
Always said I'd never purchase new. A few years old, sure, but never new. Until I did. After a lot of research I decided what I wanted. Chances of getting that exact match second hand then lucking out on a vehicle only a few years old to match? Low (and, as Smitty says, if the car's only a few years old, why sell it?). I also wanted a pre-registration GVM. Chances have improved to ... almost nil. did it hurt to hand over the money? Sure.

I now have a vehicle almost exactly the way I wanted (Ford wouldn't come to the party and make it basic but with the few additional extras I wanted). I know its history, I know how it is looked after. I know accessories are fitted well. I know the additional wiring for those accessories is up to speed (well, overkill, if you don't know what you are doing.. add extra:rolleyes:). I know the wheels/tyres are rotated every 5k and the alignment done every 10k.

And it smells nicer... for a while. Still looks like a Ranger though, can't have everything, even from new...

Cheers,
Mark
 

nitrobrent

Well-Known Member
Most people with newish vehicles that come out with us , turn around fairly quickly and go home.
Likely panel damage means exactly that.
I love what I do and do what ever I can to avoid damage , but if it does happen , its not going to ruin my day.
I have the vehicle that suits my needs.
Tyres well outside the body , mechanically , no money spared.
Horses for courses.
Screenshot_2018-05-06-20-40-00.png
 

Lost1?

Well-Known Member
I chose second hand. The ML Triton doesn't have TC or other electronics but does have a common rail diesel engine. Don't care too much about colour. I just looked for a low kilometre example with a service history.

I'm in to it for a fair bit now with the mods I have done. But I have enjoyed the trips I have done. So pretty happy so far.
 

silkwood

Well-Known Member
Most people with newish vehicles that come out with us , turn around fairly quickly and go home.
Likely panel damage means exactly that.
I love what I do and do what ever I can to avoid damage , but if it does happen , its not going to ruin my day.
I have the vehicle that suits my needs.
Tyres well outside the body , mechanically , no money spared.
Horses for courses.
View attachment 65437

This is a good comment. I've never been into 4wding for the sake of doing the tracks, it's always been about getting to places (camping, fishing, bushwalking, XC skiing) for me, but, even so, I'd never take my new(er) vehicle on some of the tracks I used to take the old Hilux. Guess it depends upon what you want the vehicle for.

Can't imagine too many choosing to take a brand new vehicle on that track, though the Jeep is ideal for doing that (hard tracks that is, not having a rest between the erosion gullies!;)). B.I.L has the four door Wrangler, thinks he does hard tracks occasionally (it is a well set up vehicle). He would have a fit if asked to go there!

Cheers,
Mark
 

dirvine

Well-Known Member
I had my car two days before I went 4wding. Day 1 better tyres than OEM. Day 2 down to Walhalla, Licola and through the Macalister river no snorkel. Pin strips, scratched wheels who cares. 1st damage is always the hardest then you just forget. On 1st service the manager came and said 1st D4 he had seen in the workshop at 1st service with mud and damage showing it had been used for what it was intended to do.
 

nitrobrent

Well-Known Member
It was a great day out with likeminded mates , in some awesome surrounds.
Didn't drive the main step , but you gotta leave something for next time.


This is a good comment. I've never been into 4wding for the sake of doing the tracks, it's always been about getting to places (camping, fishing, bushwalking, XC skiing) for me, but, even so, I'd never take my new(er) vehicle on some of the tracks I used to take the old Hilux. Guess it depends upon what you want the vehicle for.

Can't imagine too many choosing to take a brand new vehicle on that track, though the Jeep is ideal for doing that (hard tracks that is, not having a rest between the erosion gullies!;)). B.I.L has the four door Wrangler, thinks he does hard tracks occasionally (it is a well set up vehicle). He would have a fit if asked to go there!

Cheers,
Mark
 

rogerazz

4x4 Earth Contributer
Went for old. Cost for purchase and kitting out ( including fully locked ) was around 1/5th of a new cruiser. Service and repairs are minimal as this thing has only done 410,000 k's, so has around another 600,000 k's to go before major stuff ( not like new vehicles). Also runs on gas so that's about 11 lt per 100 k's if comparing to petrol costs.
Will probably see me out and maybe would have saved $60,000 over buying a new one.:D.
 
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