New LR Defender in 2020

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
#42
Is that lower structure made of aluminium?
I suspect airbags can puncture but hopefully they are easy to replace. Looks like it might be easy, so just take spares.
Defiantly ali arms. The disco 3/4 airbags had an ali shroud around them so the chances of puncture are minimal. Although these look more heavy duty overall than the disco units and don't appear to be incorporated with the shock (which I assume on the new deefer will be mounted in front). Looks like theres a few bit of structural stuff in front of the bags so that would help minimise something sharp getting to them. Looks like theres a few bit of caliper space to goto a smaller rim (at least in the rear)
 

Synchro

Well-Known Member
#43
Is that lower structure made of aluminium?
I suspect airbags can puncture but hopefully they are easy to replace. Looks like it might be easy, so just take spares.
Airbags have been in Landrovers for over 25 years - there were some instances of airbag failures in the very early years with the P38 Range Rover but with the introduction of the Discovery 3 back in 2005, airbag failure is pretty rare and are mainly simple wear on high mileage vehicles and punctures as such at virtually non existant - my 2007 example is still running it original airbags and had no issues. While the bags can be replaced by themselves, it is easier and probably just as cost effective to just replace the strut complete - not a big task.
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
#44
Having bounced down a beach in a RRS with stuffed EAS, I don't share your enthusiasm. Mobs like Greame Cooper auto make good coin converting them back to springs. I personally would put air suspension on the negative side of the ledger when totalling the preferred/unpreferred attributes of what Defender buyers want in a Defender. That thing is just a recycled Disco with a few tweaks. Nice cars, no doubt, but they aren't fooling anybody.
 

Synchro

Well-Known Member
#48
Having bounced down a beach in a RRS with stuffed EAS, I don't share your enthusiasm. Mobs like Greame Cooper auto make good coin converting them back to springs. I personally would put air suspension on the negative side of the ledger
Well having owned a RRS for 10 years and 180,000km the experience you had would have been exceptionally rare. Really as rare as a normal vehicle breaking a normal coil. Again converting a RRS to coils is unheard of in Aust. The D3 is basic trim had coils and a few D3s have been converted from air to coils but again is rare. I would never go back to coils again - the ride and flexibility in height changes just rules coils out. Like all 4wds there are accessories to enhance air suspension and provide backup if something does go wrong.
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
#49
agree with the above, I would have air bags over coil springs any day, better handling, more comfortable ride, easy access for disabled , injured or elderly, better access into multi story car parks and then up to 100mm lift for 4wding. As for reliability there are a few extra possible issues but all are easily overcome with the right gear and the pros far out way the cons IMO. The D4 is by far the best 4wd I have ever driven or been in
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
#51
20 inch rims will suck and a big design flaw, hopefully smaller rims will be available but having said that I thought 18's as a minimum on the D4 would be a issue and cause problems, totally unfounded and simply not the case after owning the car for over a year and completed a few trips and nearly 40,000km
 
#52
This is all so depressing, how can they call that fully independent soft (pretty sure it’ll be monocoque) roader a defender? I get euro safety standards are pushing car manufacturers away from solid axles and ladder chassis but to use the name of the most iconic 4wd ever - final iteration of the pioneer of the 4wd, lauded as the most capable stock vehicle - is a total travesty.

How a city orientated car like that can be uttered in the same breath as a such real vehicles as a 130 or 79 is beyond me. I’d put money on a 1998 Magna outlasting one in the bush
 

mikehzz

Well-Known Member
#53
20 inch rims will suck and a big design flaw, hopefully smaller rims will be available but having said that I thought 18's as a minimum on the D4 would be a issue and cause problems, totally unfounded and simply not the case after owning the car for over a year and completed a few trips and nearly 40,000km
The problem is the wheels, not the car's ability. I know first hand how capable and comfortable a D4 is, no question about it. However, the following video demonstrates the complete fail that is large rims. It's sponsored by Land Rover and has 2 D4's and an older Defender along with a bunch of Jap cars. The D4's got into the most trouble due to tyres. The old Defender barely struggled the whole trip. I don't think Land Rover were paying attention.

 

Synchro

Well-Known Member
#54
This is all so depressing, how can they call that fully independent soft (pretty sure it’ll be monocoque) roader a defender? final iteration of the pioneer of the 4wd, lauded as the most capable stock vehicle - is a total travesty.
Yes they said the same when the Landrover 110 (County) - the Daddy of the Defender went to all coil springs and constant wheel drive where everything else had leafs and part time 4wd - yep an absolute travesty :confused:.
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
#55
This is all so depressing, how can they call that fully independent soft (pretty sure it’ll be monocoque) roader a defender? I get euro safety standards are pushing car manufacturers away from solid axles and ladder chassis but to use the name of the most iconic 4wd ever - final iteration of the pioneer of the 4wd, lauded as the most capable stock vehicle - is a total travesty.

How a city orientated car like that can be uttered in the same breath as a such real vehicles as a 130 or 79 is beyond me. I’d put money on a 1998 Magna outlasting one in the bush
But old people can get in it, and you can park it at the shops and airbags don't fail in the bush and when the don't fail they won't leave you completely arsed up - get with the sycophants man! This thing is going to change the world.o_O And who needs a ute anyway?
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
#56
The reality is that it will have new fandangle technology compared to the old one and will have bastardised components from other vehicles in their range- that is how all manufacturers run these days to keep costs down. It is not going to be a high volume production vehicle like a corolla or Hilux etc so will need to have a broader audience appeal than say a 79 does .
 

Tink

Well-Known Member
#57
Question for those AULRO (?) owners. Whilst the airbags themselves may not pop too often due to sticks, rocks etc., what is the reliability of the electronics controlling them? If you pop a fuse, as an example, will they deflate and you have to drive home on the bump stops.
Tink
 

Synchro

Well-Known Member
#58
I can only speak for myself with my RRS - recently had an aircompressor failure where it was not providing enough air. The car stays at its height - over a longer period of time it may drop a bit as it continues to try and stay level but you get around this by pulling the fuse top the system. I rebuilt the compressor with approx $100 of parts and it now runs fine. No other suspension issues in 10 years and 180,000km travel.

People do have issues and generally these are neebies who have not learnt anything about how their car works - yes it is different to most others so you do need to know how it works. However there is a $300 accessory that is a must have (and I don't) if you are going to travel remote areas and that is an EAS inflation kit - basically a tyre inflation valve is attached to each airbag and if the system has spat the dummy, you simply inflate each airbag with a normal tyre air compressor, pull the relevant fuse to isolate the EAS and off you go.

If you want higher height you put more air in, lower let some out.
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
#59
If the fuse pops then no it wont carry out any height alterations. My D3 has nearly 300,000km on the odo and I haven't had any direct air suspension electrical faults - I did however have an intermittent yaw sensor fault (stabitlity control) that triggered a series of cascading actions, one of which is to drop the vehicle to access height. But with a LLAMS control unit I just flick the switch over to +50mm height and that tricks the system into thinking its down at access height and it will maintain the standard ride height. Havent had that particular fault for well over a year now anyway.
I did have a cracked/leaking front airbag very early in the piece of my ownership and I've since replaced all 4 shocks and airbags (just buy them as a complete assembled unit) and I've also had to change out my suspension air compressor as the old one died
 
#60
Yes they said the same when the Landrover 110 (County) - the Daddy of the Defender went to all coil springs and constant wheel drive where everything else had leafs and part time 4wd - yep an absolute travesty :confused:.
That’s not a valid comparison - yes people always whinge when a new model comes out but the change from permemant to selectable 4wd (with cdl Locked they are the same) and leaf to coil (a bigger jump but at least the axle were more or less the same) is in a totally different ball park (country even) to going to monocoque, full independent suspension, 100% electronic control, one piece body design no proper transfer case. These last two are speculative but very likely, seeing as they’re clearly catering to the school run market not real 4wds unlike the true defender
 
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