New hilux struggling with a swerve test

discomatt

Well-Known Member
Scary stuff !! but the toymota worshipers will have a valid thought process to excuse such poor performance:po_O:rolleyes:
On a serious not, I was always taught never to swerve to avoid an animal and I will always go by that because I don't think my Disco would pass that swerve test either:oops:
 

callmejoe

Well-Known Member
I dont get it.:);)

Its a toyota, unbreakable.... So why swerve just run it over an continue on yr merry way. Remember indestructible....

Oh what a feeling toyoooota..
 

smitty_r51

Well-Known Member
I thought they did a swerve test as part of the ancap stuff, sure they used to on the euro version
If so, how did it pass??
 

smitty_r51

Well-Known Member
Not much really passes the moose test easy its pretty tough test. especially for anything with high centre of gravity.

Moose are bad to hit because you tend to take out the legs and have them come through the vehicle at head height. worse than roos!
Everything else may have squirmed but none of them tipped in the same manner

Just shows. Toyota has better grip because they are fitted with better quality factory tyres.:D
I did think the passenger front tyre was probably scraping the alloy the amount of compression on the low profile tyre
 

jacnden

Well-Known Member
Scary stuff !! but the toymota worshipers will have a valid thought process to excuse such poor performance:po_O:rolleyes:
On a serious not, I was always taught never to swerve to avoid an animal and I will always go by that because I don't think my Disco would pass that swerve test either:oops:
long time ago I swerved to miss a dog and wrapped my kingswood around a pole and ended up in hospital. I don't swerve anymore. well maybe for an elephant :)
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
long time ago I swerved to miss a dog and wrapped my kingswood around a pole and ended up in hospital. I don't swerve anymore. well maybe for an elephant :)
When I had my smash repair busyness from memory I had 3 repairs from cars leaving the road due to swerving to avoid animals, one into a pole and all where badly damaged, much safer to brake as much as possible and hold a straight line
 
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barnsey062

Well-Known Member
http://www.caradvice.com.au/493858/toyota-hilux-fails-emergency-swerve-test/

Toyota Sweden responded to the test with the following statement:


“Based on all the tests carried out during development, we are confident that the Toyota Hilux is a safe vehicle.

“As we understand, you have performed an evasive manoeuvre tests in your newspaper testing protocols on a series pickups, including the Toyota Hilux.

“You have informed us that the Toyota Hilux is not living up to your expectations. We were surprised by the test results, and we will take your assessment very seriously, just as we take the capacity for evasive manoeuvres as serious in the development of our vehicles.

“Hilux has been repeatedly tested according to ISO 3888 standard for evasive action test during the development of the model and then have passed the tests successfully.
“Several technical parameters have an impact on the outcome of an evasive manoeuvre, so we want to better understand the exact parameters for your test.”

We have contacted Toyota Australia for comment.

The HiLux sold here has standard traction and stability control, airbags for all occupants, reversing camera and the maximum five-star ANCAP crash rating.

UPDATE:

Toyota Australia statement.
At Toyota, the safety and security of our customers remains our number one priority.
“Toyota takes the report published by the Swedish automobile magazine, Teknikens Värld, on this emergency-avoidance test seriously and we are currently in discussions with the publication to find out additional details about the test.”MORE: Toyota HiLux comparison tests against all rivals
 

Spooner

Well-Known Member
Thats really strange to look at . Our BT50 is the 1st car Ive ever had with ESC .
I actually had to swerve a towelhead cutting into me on the Monash one morning .
I did the swerve thing , and the car changed direction yet fought me every inch of the way with my senses , as it corrected itself before it got anywhere near sideways at 100kph. A really bizzare experience . Felt like I was suffering a stroke or something , as time stands still for a few seconds while it does its stuff.
Quite freaky really , until you experience it , I can't explain it , but it does work :)
 

darb

Well-Known Member
Hiliux isn't the only one, Some Mercs, Porsche and Jeeps fail too (if you turn off the ESP / Traction AIds)

The European tested hilux, to be fair, doesn't have the ESP / TC stuff, and apparently the ones which do won't permit a vehicle to roll like that (i.e the Aussie variant)

But as others have said, hilux has always been nicknamed Rollux for a reason.

Btw, I drive one, but my ego, girth and confidence aren't threatened by what vehicle I'm in.

Swerve tests aside, as others touch on ... I've always been taught, in Australia anyway, to hit animals head on ... better off smashing the front end, then power sliding on gravel at 100 clicks and ending up into a more solid tree (or power-rolling after careening into the drainage ditches).

Baffles me that toyota don't just use a wider offset rim from factory, the SR5 flares certainly have a lot of room for that.

THen again toyota do a lot of stuff that makes you scratch your head. Infact, so do most car makers.
 

darb

Well-Known Member
Thats really strange to look at . Our BT50 is the 1st car Ive ever had with ESC .
I actually had to swerve a towelhead cutting into me on the Monash one morning .
I did the swerve thing , and the car changed direction yet fought me every inch of the way with my senses , as it corrected itself before it got anywhere near sideways at 100kph. A really bizzare experience . Felt like I was suffering a stroke or something , as time stands still for a few seconds while it does its stuff.
Quite freaky really , until you experience it , I can't explain it , but it does work :)
ESP saved my arse once in a very high powered RWD V8. I had taken off from a set of lights in a 100 zone and belted the thing, as I came up over a crest, i simultaneously went from 2nd to third (clutch / manual) ... the power (weight) coming off the rear axles for that split second at top of a crest was enough to send me sideways across a couple of lanes toward concrete barrier (doing around 100 clicks) .. anyway, ESP kicked in, took complete control, arrested the slide , corrected me and had me back in lane facing the right way in about half a second I reckon.

there's just no way a driver (well, other than a race car / rally driver expecting trouble) would have been able to react like that ... and individusally apply brake force to opposiing wheels at a few hundred decisions per second.

I truly reckon I would have been mince meat if not for that, and it certainly made me check myself in future.
 
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rogerazz

4x4 Earth Contributer
I have grown up driving vehicles with no traction aids or stability aids or any aids. I still drive a Troopy with no aids and no air bags so I have to be extra careful.
I once practiced running down rabbits at night on the highway. This gave me the nerve to keep straight lines when running down or missing animals that ran across my vehicle, which i have done a quite a few times. It is a natural reflex to swerve when presented with something you are going to hit. If you have never run down an animal, then it's going to be hard not to swerve.
I practiced 90 degree handbrake turns on gravel roads in Volkswagons just for experience.
I have actually braked hard in a vehicle with ABS on a wet surface without activating the ABS and stopping faster, which surprised my Defensive / Advanced driving instructor.
I can feel when a vehicle is going to let go while cornering on a wet road. It's called feeling your vehicle's movement through brakes, tyres and steering.
Drifting is another good exercise.
Do not try this at home, I mean on the road.
Just drive a car that does it all for you until one day :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:.
 
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darb

Well-Known Member
I lovvvveee troopies, truly do ... but have always cringed following a mate in his along some rather hairy / rutted / angled / narrow beach runs where I've seen the uphill wheels lift more than once!
All of it's a bit moot once you head offroad, all manner of things will influence roll risk, driver decisions being chief among them.

Followed a mate last year who was new to 4wd'ing, along one of our nasty beach runs (where angles are pretty roll-risky) ... he had a 200 series sahara, and a LOT of gear on his roof platform ... was watching his uphill wheels lift a few times , eeeek.

Didn't say anything over the UHF as didn't want to upset his mrs... but let him know when we pulled up. Bottom line, too much weight up top.
 

muc the truck

Well-Known Member
Scary stuff !! but the toymota worshipers will have a valid thought process to excuse such poor performance:po_O:rolleyes:
On a serious not, I was always taught never to swerve to avoid an animal and I will always go by that because I don't think my Disco would pass that swerve test either:oops:
that depends on what size animal . Ever had a big Bitumen grey bull cross they road at night? I jack knifed the box trailer but did not hit it . Had I have done so it would have been a helicopter ride to hospital .

I know your disco will do far better than that unless you have all your swaybars disconnected.
 
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