MQ Triton - bumpy ride on road - ARB 2” lift

Mitch12345

New Member
Hi there,

My MQ was bumpy before I got a lift kit put in by ARB. So I thought I’d spend the $2200 and put in a EK4604B1 old man emu set from ARB.
I have a steel bull bar and 31” A/T tyres on my car.
I was told by ARB it will be a more comfortable ride on the road, it’s exactly the same (bumpy).
I’m running 32psi all round unloaded.
Has anyone had this trouble before and any ideas what can be done to improve it?
 

RBJET

Well-Known Member
Aftermarket lifts will generally have a higher than factory spring rate.
Do you know what weight the springs you bought were designed to carry? They could just be too stiff.
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
So what is the set ups rated constant weight??

Im not up on it all & am about to look at getting a new set up myself & I would imagine if you went 500kg constant then unladen it would be pretty stiff & hard??
 

Mitch12345

New Member
I have this setup in my triton.
It’s recommeneed 0-300kg of load. It’s the lowest rating, it’s designed for more comfortbility on road and still be ok for off road.
It is bouncy as hell on the road, and bouncy off-road also.
I’m not sure if 32psi on the road with 31’s is correct or not. I used to run 36 but it was worse. I’m considering calling them because they did say it will provide a more comfortable ride on road and off road. It’s realistally the same as my stock suspension.
 

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Triton14

Well-Known Member
So would most people say that a 500kg constant is the way to go or is this related more to this particular brand?
 

Mitch12345

New Member
More constant load the bumpier it is without any load is what I’ve been told. I usually don’t have any load that’s why I purchased the lowest load setup
 

Maxy

Active Member
I've only recently purchased an Isuzu dmax and compared to the Patrol I had its terrible. Not loving leaf springs in the back.
 

Cyberess

Active Member
The Original Factory suspension setup on Tritons is rather soft, and gives soft ride, probably a bit too soft as my work ute can bottom out a little too soon. With lift kits generally firm the ride up a bit, and if you were feeling a bumpy ride before the lift kit, we will certainly feel it after the lift kit.

Since your problem of ride your referring to in on road, what is the actual band and size of the AT tyres that you are running? The the tyres on factory wheels or on after market wheels?
Have you had them aligned and balanced recently? Some tyre shops can be busy and at times be a little crap at their job, and you can be amazed of the feeling of a vehicle that a good tyre alignment and balance can do. Also if tyres get too old that can also be a source of a crap ride.
 
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Triton14

Well-Known Member
The Original Factory suspension setup on Tridents is rather soft, and give soft ride, probably a bit too soft

You do mean Triton right?

I must admit my MY14 MN drives like a car but still fund it reasonably good off road & thats with the factory suspension & a TJM steel bar, winch & full underbody protection.
Its my next priority to get it done as I know have added a lot of weight but the suspension has only done 44,000km.

The thing that saves me atm is that I generally dont 4x4 with the vehicle loaded, Ive usually emptied the ute & set up a camp before going to far off track.
If I was hitting rugged tracks fully loaded then I suspect I would be in a world of trouble!

Time to work out what I plan to get
 

silkwood

Well-Known Member
Mitch, what have you been driving previously, to consider a stock Triton "bumpy"? It could be a case of comparative variance.

Cheers,
Mark
 

Cyberess

Active Member
I have now corrected my reply with the Tridents thingy ;)

I agree Tritons generally drive like a car -- tinny one at that, but a bumpy ride on the road makes me think something else is going on rather than just the suspension.
 

Aza013

Well-Known Member
Mitch, what have you been driving previously, to consider a stock Triton "bumpy"? It could be a case of comparative variance.

Cheers,
Mark
I’d have to agree. At the end of the day it’s a Ute not a car/wagon. They need weight in the back to do the job they are meant for otherwise they will jump and bounce around.
But you may already know this :)
 

CaptainBanana

Well-Known Member
You can't actually lift the Triton 2 inches in the front, it will physically bind on the droop bump stops which makes the ride in the front all but unbearable.

I had three different sets of leaf springs in the back of mine as my weight increased so I've tried all the common types. At 0-350kg it rode as good as stock because they are a multistage arrangement.

I have two questions the first one is which do you feel is rough the front or rear?

Can you measure the distance from the centre of your wheel hub to the wheel arch on the guard?
 

2luxes

Well-Known Member
When you change the original standard suspension design, you always gain something and loose something. A empty standard ute is usually bumpy. As you add weight that is properly distributed, it usually gets a little softer but not as smooth as a family sedan for example. It is after all a commercial vehicle that has been designed to carry a fair amount of weight.

As RBJET said, aftermarket springs usually have a higher rate. Spring rate for decades was measured in pounds and inches. It is the amount of weight that would compress a spring 1 inch. For example a 200 lb linear spring would compress 1 inch when 200 lbs was put on it. Another 200 lbs would compress it another inch . 200 more would take it down another inch. You now have 600 lbs on it and it has compressed three inches.

These days it is all metric but the springs still compress the same way. If you can find out the rate of your standard springs and the new ones, you will mosty likely see that the new ones have a higher rate and will feel harder on the road.

Just to confuse things there is also 'spring load" which is the load it will support at a certain height and "wheel rate" . It involves the distance the spring is from the wheel. https://www.google.com/search?q=whe...69i65j69i60.4393j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

You have changed both wheels and springs and most likely shocks so it would take a suspension engineer to work out exactly what you have done.

Tyres and their pressures are another issue. My 03 single cab Hilux has been running around since 2007 all over mountain and seriously remote desert tracks on its standard 205 x 16 LT tyres on the pressures recommended in the owners handbook. They are 25 psi front at all times and 25 to 34 rear depending on load. The ride is smooth at all times and the tyres don't wear their outside edges as they would if the pressures were too low. The only time I have ever reduced the pressures was to climb to the top of Big Red and back down again.

I drive around town in a 1991 4x4 Hilux dual cab with 31 inch tyres on it. I hate the bloody things but they were on the car when I bought it. They have 24 front and 26 rear. They had a lot more when I bought it five years ago and the centres of the tread were wearing faster than the edges indicating too much pressure.

The first thing you should do is decide exactly what you want to do with the car. If it is to be a play car for weekend fun in the roughest conditions you can find then you will need lifts, lockers etc. If you want to see the country, and that includes roads like the Canning Stock Route or the Anne Beadell, then leave it standard. The car has been designed for those conditions and countless local people in those areas have been driving around in standard cars since the T Ford came on the market.

The only modifications that I have on my 03 is an auto locking front diff, high diff and transmission breathers, a snorkel, some wire mesh between the grille and the radiator and a HF radio. It does not have a bull bar or winch but in some areas I carry a hand winch.

Suspension alterations also change the way a car handles , particularly in an emergence situation, but that subject is very complicated and best left for another day.
 
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