Most practical and space efficient cooking setup?

Les PK Ranger

4x4 Earth Contributer
There's no perfect cooking stove for every trip though.

Most times I take the single burner 'briefcase' cooker with the standard disposable cylinders.
They are slow (esp in cold weather), expensive to run (cyls empty fast), and if not used correctly can be dangerous (mostly with too large a frypans).
But they are compact, light, and easy.

I also have 2 (and 3) burner regular gas cylinder stove, which I can use with the 4kg bottle, or better for trips of only a week or so the 2kg cyl.
This is a good option as it is a little more room, set up, but faster and more economical to run . . . much better than option above in cold weather.

Then I have several little bushwalking gas stoves that use the larger cyls (several sizes avail), a little more economical to run, a lot faster to set up and cook, but need a windshield sometimes.

9/10 out in real bush, we'll use a frypan over fire / coals, or less often folding bbq plate (good for groups).
Usually in conjunction with the briefcase stove to boil water in the morning before leaving camp (no morning fire).

I also have shellite stoves, but very rarely use them now . . . old bushwalking technology that was the best option back then, and sometimes it could be now, just not too often.

Every trip, I look at several things . . .
Need for fuel during a trip (duration, carrying capacity)
Access to fuel en route, if top off expected (wood or gas etc)
Menu, and what's best for cooking overall
Even the weather (cold, windy, or fine expected)

You'll end up with a shed full of cookers if you camp long enough.
Alongside the shelters, sleeping bags / mats, and other such items.

My advice is get a single briefcase cooker, a small frypan (not large enough dia to go over the cyl area), a small pot, and a kettle.
That will do you pretty well starting off and not break the bank, go from there as you adapt into the outdoors.

I would steer away from briefcase stoves with plates (like your SCA link), don't think they'd get really hot enough to do a nice steak fast on them.
 

Robbie_P

Member
Thanks for the advice guys..

I still plan to use my BBQ plate / grill for most of my cooking.

Does anyone ever take a few heatbeads to add to wood when cooking? Heatbeats are quite small and compact to bring along
 

Poppa

Well-Known Member
You'll end up with a shed full of cookers if you camp long enough.
Alongside the shelters, sleeping bags / mats, and other such items.
A new thread could be started just on that topic - how many of us have a shed full of cookers and whatever.
Seems a lifetime ago when all I had was an aluminium frypan, box of matches, sausages and a bottle of sauce. Bloody hell, it was a lifetime ago!
Got several BBQs, couple of gas stoves, 12v Oven, three shellite stoves, a couple of Trangias, even a cast iron sausage cooker (like a sandwich waffle thing only it fits three sausages in it) - but I still like the frying pan (spun steel not aluminium - good lesson learnt), matches, snags and sauce.
Apologies for hijacking the thread - back to original topic now.
 

Gidgee

Active Member
Stumbled across this regards the little butane cylinder stoves. I reckon I have on of the older Gasmate ones :oops:
 

silkwood

Well-Known Member
There are loads of budget options on Ali Express, most of the decent gas units are made in China anyway. Gas is simple and light (in canisters, I also refill my Coleman units). I use the lunch-box type and either take the Weber Baby Q or the Coleman two burner, depending on the trip. I also carry a small bushwalking stove and canister, in case I decide to do an overnight.

If you want one of the lunch-box types which is more reliable, I've found the Gasmate fits the bill. I've had a couple of others fail.

Cheers,
Mark
 

silkwood

Well-Known Member
Fits the brief? Most practical and space efficient kitchen? This is my kayak touring setup. If I had a fridge on board I’d be away.
Cam, did you steal my camp photo?:eek: Same table, same pots, except I've changed over to an Aero-Press for coffee and I recently bought one of the Firemaple copies of the Jetboil.
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
Cam, did you steal my camp photo?:eek: Same table, same pots, except I've changed over to an Aero-Press for coffee and I recently bought one of the Firemaple copies of the Jetboil.
I think you’ve put a pic up here somewhere of it? I remember thinking it was very similar. I’ve been eyeing off an aero press but the Scrooge in me knows a perfectly good moka would then go unused. Maybe one day. I do a little bit of miniature cooking/reheating happy camper gourmet etc so I am happy enough with the little stove for the time being. Those jetboils are pretty cool things though. So long as we are out there, that’s the important bit
 

Les PK Ranger

4x4 Earth Contributer
Stumbled across this regards the little butane cylinder stoves. I reckon I have on of the older Gasmate ones :oops:
If you have just go get a new one if worried about it.
All the ones out there after major recalls were done is all ok, and has solved one or two design issues.

Most problems were with people using a way too big a pan on them, that went over the gas cyl area and got that too hot.
** You still have to not do this !! **
Resulted in one or two explosions apparently, one I recall in the news was someone using it at their home in a kitchen, cooking their meal !
 

G_ute

Well-Known Member
Yes, a shed full of stoves. Nothing perfect for all situations. Had a thing for liquid fuel/shellite stoves for a while. Coleman, Primus, Optimus, SVEA, ex-army types. A real hobby. But gas is much easier and more reliable, if bulky for a bottle plus stove.

Will take my little Coleman dual fuel for hiking.


Everything else a bigger twin burner gas.
Looking forward to using my new wood stove/heater in winter (a Wooshka, like an Ozpig)
 

silkwood

Well-Known Member
Ah, the old Optimus 8R "chuffer". didn't you feel safe in a timber high country hut with one of those?! NOT!

Cheers,
Mark
 

Les PK Ranger

4x4 Earth Contributer
Ah, the old Optimus 8R "chuffer". didn't you feel safe in a timber high country hut with one of those?! NOT!

Cheers,
Mark
I recall NEARLY burning down Lake Vera hut on Frenchmans Cap track Tassie a couple of decades ago.
Damn Optimus clip connector to bottle wasn't on properly and popped off, spewing shellite under pressure like a flame thrower.
I still have a little burn scar on my hand (looks like a little Tasmania !) from picking it up and throwing it out the open hut door.
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
So after
There's no perfect cooking stove for every trip though.

Most times I take the single burner 'briefcase' cooker with the standard disposable cylinders.
They are slow (esp in cold weather), expensive to run (cyls empty fast), and if not used correctly can be dangerous (mostly with too large a frypans).
But they are compact, light, and easy.

I also have 2 (and 3) burner regular gas cylinder stove, which I can use with the 4kg bottle, or better for trips of only a week or so the 2kg cyl.
This is a good option as it is a little more room, set up, but faster and more economical to run . . . much better than option above in cold weather.

Then I have several little bushwalking gas stoves that use the larger cyls (several sizes avail), a little more economical to run, a lot faster to set up and cook, but need a windshield sometimes.

9/10 out in real bush, we'll use a frypan over fire / coals, or less often folding bbq plate (good for groups).
Usually in conjunction with the briefcase stove to boil water in the morning before leaving camp (no morning fire).

I also have shellite stoves, but very rarely use them now . . . old bushwalking technology that was the best option back then, and sometimes it could be now, just not too often.

Every trip, I look at several things . . .
Need for fuel during a trip (duration, carrying capacity)
Access to fuel en route, if top off expected (wood or gas etc)
Menu, and what's best for cooking overall
Even the weather (cold, windy, or fine expected)

You'll end up with a shed full of cookers if you camp long enough.
Alongside the shelters, sleeping bags / mats, and other such items.

My advice is get a single briefcase cooker, a small frypan (not large enough dia to go over the cyl area), a small pot, and a kettle.
That will do you pretty well starting off and not break the bank, go from there as you adapt into the outdoors.

I would steer away from briefcase stoves with plates (like your SCA link), don't think they'd get really hot enough to do a nice steak fast on them.
Your post makes perfect sense & I can relate to it.
I must admit most of my trips are short but regardless still I am prepared to cook with at least 4 different methods of equipment.

1. Duel burner LPG stove
2. Single butane suitcase burner
3. Open fire
4. Hiking butane burner

If somethings not right I can still make a feed :)
 

typhoeus

Well-Known Member
I use a double one of these with the fold up barby plate mentioned earlier in stead of wood. Dowside is carrying the gas bottle. Also have a canister type stove for boiling the billy etc
 

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Swaggie

Moderator
Fits the brief? Most practical and space efficient kitchen? This is my kayak touring setup. If I had a fridge on board I’d be away.
If that's a Gasmate one I have the same,also runs off a cheap propane Canisters with another screw on connection.Been testing it for about a year to write a review on it.It's been great to be honest and cheap to run.I like the option to use the canister that's in your picture as the others don't work at certain altitudes and weather conditions.

Also use the Iprimus 24000btu,it's a wicked unit,use high if needed and down to a simmer when required....I'll write a review on it also..

https://www.tentworld.com.au/buy-sale/primus-stove-2-burner-25000-btu


Cheers
 

rogerazz

4x4 Earth Contributer
Stumbled across this regards the little butane cylinder stoves. I reckon I have on of the older Gasmate ones :oops:
Remember with the butane cylinders , use only ones that have CRV (Countersink release vent) safety technology to prevent explosions in over pressure situations. They have a blue line circle around top. They don't explode but vent the gas.
Also do not have any pans , hot plates etc., reaching over the gas cylinders as they spread heat to the cylinders, which may cause serious problems .
 

G_ute

Well-Known Member
I would also recommend that the gas cylinder is removed from the cheaper suitcase burners when travelling (the aerosol can type) - at least if stored horizontally.
I had one leak while I was driving once. The cylinder was in the 'unlocked' state. Glad they put smell in the gas. Could have been a disaster.
 

Les PK Ranger

4x4 Earth Contributer
CRV (Countersink release vent) safety technology to prevent explosions in over pressure situations. They have a blue line circle around top. They don't explode but vent the gas.
Note in tests I've seen online, they do expel a high volume of high pressure flames while 'venting'.
Better than an explosion of flame, but these stoves should be used with a little caution, not inside tents / annexes etc, just in case.

FWIW, I've still got a pile of non CRV cyls, and I'm quite happy to use them up.
I think Bunnings STILL sells them !
They're green colour and they once had them out for a buck ea, so grabbed a carton.
Not many left now though.

The tip for small pan size is best, obvious anything that goes over the fuel hatch is going to reflect direct heat onto the area and THAT is the main reason these stoves had a couple of issues with consumer misuse.

There was a brand or two that had a problem with stove top trivet not having 'space' between burner and pot level, that was address with trivet top that HAS top be flipped to keep pan up.
There were also a couple of brand that did have a problem with the gas cyl entry point not sealing.
 
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