mn Triton intake clean @ 50,000kms

rogerazz

4x4 Earth Contributer
#21
I spoke with Glenno yesterday. He said that he again pulled the inlet manifold off at around 110,000 k's on his Triton. Build up was not much and therefore his egr plate and catch can was doing a good job. Maybe good idea would have been to set it all up well before 50,000 k's that he did the first time.
Was a fair bit of oil/crap in the catch can.
 
#22
With the Ranger (PK at least) you can get codes for EGR block errors stopped with an ECU tune (part of the tune process), might be same for Triton or other such electronics ?
Spot on Les,
The best way to this is to have your Ecu re mapped, The Tritons get very good results from tuning.
 

Les PK Ranger

4x4 Earth Contributer
#23
http://ozbushelectronics.com.au/ has had a PK Ranger electronic 'mapper' for quite a while now, I (and several other Ranger owners) got in with him early to help test it on mine and refine to the cabin fuel trim model.
It works great !! And costs far less than an ECU remap.
Full blank put in to be sure, no codes.

I am pretty sure the Toyota D4D mapper is completed, and I recall advising him he should do one for the Triton.
They have the SPV (?) Industries module, but it's just a cheap diode fix that isn't terribly refined, but still sold for around $150 !! (10c diode and a plastic box apparently).
 

muc the truck

Well-Known Member
#24
So after blocking the EGR and fitting a catch can I decided to remove the intake and clean it out. Not being a mechanic and not wanting to do any damage i took my time and the whole job and it took about 5 hours. Thanks to Rogazz for lending a hand while putting it all back together. The only tools we needed was a set of ring/open ended spanners(10 mm, 12 mm and 14 mm), socket set(10 mm, 12 mm and 14 mm and extension bar), pliers and a torque wrench.



The car has just over 50,000 km on it and has had the catch can and blanking plate for around 10,000 km.

Please excuse the 2 blurry photos.

Firstly i downloaded the workshop manual from the net and had a bit of a read.


Then I disconnected the battery and pipe from the intercooler to the throttle body to make some space to work in.


After that i disconnected the wiring harness from from the fuel pump, EGR, alternator, intake temp sensor and two plugs at the rear of the motor. I didn't remove it completely just enough to be able to lift it out of the way while removing the inlet. All the plugs are different shapes so they could only go back onto the correct plug.


I also had to remove the vac line that runs across the rear of the motor. Once this was done i removed the bolts that hold down the intake and lifted it out. The intake on these motors have 2 inlets to each cylinder.


Once I had it off the car I found that there was a significant build up of oil and carbon in the inlet. Because of the design of the inlet and the way the air flows into it, the front two cylinders were coated with about 1.5 mm of the black paste. The rear two cylinders were substantially worse with around 4-5 mm thick coating in some places. The rear two inlets were probably on 85% of the size they should be when clean.



This is the buildup inside the EGR valve


At this point I diluted some fairly strong degreaser and sat the whole intake in a large bucket and started to clean all the inlets. This process took around an hour and a half. I used tooth brushes as they where able to get in and bend around quiet a long way into the main plenum. I soaked the the whole inlet in the diluted solution and then used a pressure washer to remove as much of the coating for in the inaccessible parts of the inlet until the water flowed out clean. Next time around i will invest in a parts washer for this part of the job.



After the clean. Not 100% but much better.



To re install everything was a fairly quick process just a reverse of the order we disassembled everything. The only difference is that you need to use the torque wrench to bolt down the inlet manifold. this is where you need to have your workshop manual as it tells you the correct procedure, order and torque settings for the 12 bolts that hold the inlet down. Its a must to follow this order otherwise you run the risk of damaging the inlet and possibly striping out the treads in the head.

After starting the car again and everything worked without engine light :D I noticed that the idle was smoother than before. After a test drive i didn't notice any power increase but I did notice that under load when the turbo was working hard that the car seemed to pull harder. I will report in a week or two if i have noted any change in fuel economy also.

I'm very happy i have done this and i will probably do it again when the car gets up to 100,000 km and see if the blanking plate and the catch can have helped keep the intake cleaner.

One thing i did note is that from the intake through to the valves in the head were still very dirty but there isn't much you can do to clean that out so for the time being it has to stay that way.
What is all the pink green and white speckle stuff in there on your photos . looks like contamination after it was opened up . its in the head also .
 
#27
Thanks for the guide, wow what a crappy job , definitely not a job for the non adventurous, mine had 70,000 and was pretty disgusting, I used oven cleaner for half an hour then burnt the rest off with map gas, with a final clean up with 3 in 1 degreaser. Any overal difference who knows, but good to know the engine is a tad healthier
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
#28
Well it maybe an old thread but you have my interest as this in my model ute!

I have also noticed my Triton at only 22,000km blows a heap of smoke as well under acceleration.

Mines still under warranty so I don't think Id be to keen on doing this kind of mod yet & even attempt the to take the intake off.

So Im still an novice on all things diesel so what does putting one of these plug in EGR Delete Blanks do anyway??
I ended up taking my Triton back to the dealer & they said the reason for the smoke was over fueling so they just hooked up the PC to it & tuned it up I guess & no more smoke.

So a question about the EGR blanking plates, I have seen some with a small hole in them, I presume this is to show the sensors that the EGR is still working.
this will obviously still let some gas through but reduce the amount of build, I presume when you do this you don't need to do the catch can thing as you are nor disconnecting the rest of the system??

But if that is the case it would probably be less effective to how the OP set his up??
 
#30
So after blocking the EGR and fitting a catch can I decided to remove the intake and clean it out. Not being a mechanic and not wanting to do any damage i took my time and the whole job and it took about 5 hours. Thanks to Rogazz for lending a hand while putting it all back together. The only tools we needed was a set of ring/open ended spanners(10 mm, 12 mm and 14 mm), socket set(10 mm, 12 mm and 14 mm and extension bar), pliers and a torque wrench.



The car has just over 50,000 km on it and has had the catch can and blanking plate for around 10,000 km.

Please excuse the 2 blurry photos.

Firstly i downloaded the workshop manual from the net and had a bit of a read.


Then I disconnected the battery and pipe from the intercooler to the throttle body to make some space to work in.


After that i disconnected the wiring harness from from the fuel pump, EGR, alternator, intake temp sensor and two plugs at the rear of the motor. I didn't remove it completely just enough to be able to lift it out of the way while removing the inlet. All the plugs are different shapes so they could only go back onto the correct plug.


I also had to remove the vac line that runs across the rear of the motor. Once this was done i removed the bolts that hold down the intake and lifted it out. The intake on these motors have 2 inlets to each cylinder.


Once I had it off the car I found that there was a significant build up of oil and carbon in the inlet. Because of the design of the inlet and the way the air flows into it, the front two cylinders were coated with about 1.5 mm of the black paste. The rear two cylinders were substantially worse with around 4-5 mm thick coating in some places. The rear two inlets were probably on 85% of the size they should be when clean.



This is the buildup inside the EGR valve


At this point I diluted some fairly strong degreaser and sat the whole intake in a large bucket and started to clean all the inlets. This process took around an hour and a half. I used tooth brushes as they where able to get in and bend around quiet a long way into the main plenum. I soaked the the whole inlet in the diluted solution and then used a pressure washer to remove as much of the coating for in the inaccessible parts of the inlet until the water flowed out clean. Next time around i will invest in a parts washer for this part of the job.



After the clean. Not 100% but much better.



To re install everything was a fairly quick process just a reverse of the order we disassembled everything. The only difference is that you need to use the torque wrench to bolt down the inlet manifold. this is where you need to have your workshop manual as it tells you the correct procedure, order and torque settings for the 12 bolts that hold the inlet down. Its a must to follow this order otherwise you run the risk of damaging the inlet and possibly striping out the treads in the head.

After starting the car again and everything worked without engine light :D I noticed that the idle was smoother than before. After a test drive i didn't notice any power increase but I did notice that under load when the turbo was working hard that the car seemed to pull harder. I will report in a week or two if i have noted any change in fuel economy also.

I'm very happy i have done this and i will probably do it again when the car gets up to 100,000 km and see if the blanking plate and the catch can have helped keep the intake cleaner.

One thing i did note is that from the intake through to the valves in the head were still very dirty but there isn't much you can do to clean that out so for the time being it has to stay that way.
Hey mate may I ask how you removed the last bolt closest to the firewall on the intake manifold I can't for the life of me get a tool in there to make it work and im just stripping the bolt
 
#31
So after blocking the EGR and fitting a catch can I decided to remove the intake and clean it out. Not being a mechanic and not wanting to do any damage i took my time and the whole job and it took about 5 hours. Thanks to Rogazz for lending a hand while putting it all back together. The only tools we needed was a set of ring/open ended spanners(10 mm, 12 mm and 14 mm), socket set(10 mm, 12 mm and 14 mm and extension bar), pliers and a torque wrench.



The car has just over 50,000 km on it and has had the catch can and blanking plate for around 10,000 km.

Please excuse the 2 blurry photos.

Firstly i downloaded the workshop manual from the net and had a bit of a read.


Then I disconnected the battery and pipe from the intercooler to the throttle body to make some space to work in.


After that i disconnected the wiring harness from from the fuel pump, EGR, alternator, intake temp sensor and two plugs at the rear of the motor. I didn't remove it completely just enough to be able to lift it out of the way while removing the inlet. All the plugs are different shapes so they could only go back onto the correct plug.


I also had to remove the vac line that runs across the rear of the motor. Once this was done i removed the bolts that hold down the intake and lifted it out. The intake on these motors have 2 inlets to each cylinder.


Once I had it off the car I found that there was a significant build up of oil and carbon in the inlet. Because of the design of the inlet and the way the air flows into it, the front two cylinders were coated with about 1.5 mm of the black paste. The rear two cylinders were substantially worse with around 4-5 mm thick coating in some places. The rear two inlets were probably on 85% of the size they should be when clean.



This is the buildup inside the EGR valve


At this point I diluted some fairly strong degreaser and sat the whole intake in a large bucket and started to clean all the inlets. This process took around an hour and a half. I used tooth brushes as they where able to get in and bend around quiet a long way into the main plenum. I soaked the the whole inlet in the diluted solution and then used a pressure washer to remove as much of the coating for in the inaccessible parts of the inlet until the water flowed out clean. Next time around i will invest in a parts washer for this part of the job.



After the clean. Not 100% but much better.



To re install everything was a fairly quick process just a reverse of the order we disassembled everything. The only difference is that you need to use the torque wrench to bolt down the inlet manifold. this is where you need to have your workshop manual as it tells you the correct procedure, order and torque settings for the 12 bolts that hold the inlet down. Its a must to follow this order otherwise you run the risk of damaging the inlet and possibly striping out the treads in the head.

After starting the car again and everything worked without engine light :D I noticed that the idle was smoother than before. After a test drive i didn't notice any power increase but I did notice that under load when the turbo was working hard that the car seemed to pull harder. I will report in a week or two if i have noted any change in fuel economy also.

I'm very happy i have done this and i will probably do it again when the car gets up to 100,000 km and see if the blanking plate and the catch can have helped keep the intake cleaner.

One thing i did note is that from the intake through to the valves in the head were still very dirty but there isn't much you can do to clean that out so for the time being it has to stay that way.


G'Day Mate. Just wanted to know where you got a workshop manual from, As i have a 2010 MN and want to do a Intake clean like yours and i need the Torque Specs. If you can help out thats would be great.
 

Les PK Ranger

4x4 Earth Contributer
#37
So the 6.0+1.0 would be 7 nm total then yeah
Nah that is 6nm +/- 1.0 means you could set that to between 5nm to 7nm and be within specs, or 3.69 ft lbs to 5.61 ft lbs.

And that is just the temp torque setting for A side, to gently refix manifold in place.
You then torque up side B to 24nm +/- 3.0 (nuts 20nm +/- 2.0) and then same 24nm +/- 3.0 side A bolts once again to finish.
 

Les PK Ranger

4x4 Earth Contributer
#38
Whatever your torque wrench settings are in (other than nm) you can just go to google and search ‘X’nm in ft lbs (or inch lbs etc), it will tell you the setting you need to apply.
 
#39
Whatever your torque wrench settings are in (other than nm) you can just go to google and search ‘X’nm in ft lbs (or inch lbs etc), it will tell you the setting you need to apply.

Thank you so much for helping me out Les. Now i will get to working on my rig so it runs better. Thank you ocnce again.
 

Les PK Ranger

4x4 Earth Contributer
#40
Thank you so much for helping me out Les. Now i will get to working on my rig so it runs better. Thank you ocnce again.
That's ok mate, I just hope you can manage it all right, if you have some sort of workshop manual that covers this you should be ok.
If unsure, just take pics before removing things, and make notes so you can refer back to them, put nuts / bolts/ screws etc in little ziplock bags for each major part you remove, write on bags what they're for.
Get all parts / materials needed, gaskets, cleaner, etc, and try and do it in one day so it's all fresh in your mind. (It should only take perhaps a few hours anyway, unless it needs some radical decaking !!)

Have you actually checked if the intake manifold requires cleaning ?
There should be a MAP sensor located in the manifold that you can remove (and clean) and while it's out you can dip a screwdriver down into the hole and do a little scrape of the wall.
If there is a little bit of tar like carp on the tip, that's not too bad and it could be left, but if apparently well caked / coated then yeah good to clean it.

Also good to install a catch can straight away, to stop one part of the problem, the oil mist from the PCV system.
That's easy to do for a couple of hundred bucks, and when the EGR gas (carrying some exhaust soot) is filtered back into the intake (under load / acceleration) it doesn't then mix with the oil mist to create this tar over time.

Very crappy and lazy system for sure.
 
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