Mitsubishi Super Select-II, When and where?

#1
Mitsubishi’s signature 4WD system Super Select-II provides driver comfort and confidence when you need it, allowing your vehicle to adapt to each new surface under tread. Super Select-II has four settings to choose from, each suited to individual driving conditions.



2H (2WD High Range)

When in 2H power is sent solely to the rear axle where it is distributed by an open rear differential. The best driving conditions for this mode are long haul road use and dry weather urban use where low traction situations are unlikely to occur. The benefit of using 2H is increased fuel economy as there is less resistance between the vehicle’s drive train and the road.


4H (Full Time 4WD)

Switch across into 4H and all wheels are driven via the transfer case with an open centre differential, this means all four wheels will send power to the ground while still operating independently of one another. Providing the driver with increased traction on rough roads and when extra control is required on bitumen and in hazardous conditions.


4HLC (4WD High Range with locked centre differential)

When things really start to get loose, on rugged terrain and low-grip surfaces, activating 4HLC locks the center differential. This means all wheels front and rear will receive equal power to help maintain vehicle stability and control. A good rule to follow is stick to 4HLC when off road above 30km/h.


4LLC (4WD Low Range with locked centre differential)

In situations where traction is at an all-time low, activating 4LLC flicks the transmission across into a lower gear set, allowing power to be delivered slowly through the locked centre differential to all four wheels. This provides excellent traction on steep hills, sand and deep snow and should be used when navigating tricky situations at speeds under 30km/h.


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#3
With center locked, the rear diff will still put all the power to the wheel with least traction (not good if that's the wheel in the air). Rear diff can only be engaged while in llcc but is used in really low traction areas and areas where you could have wheels lift or have less pressure on one wheel than the other
 
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