mistakes can be costly

mikehzz

Well-Known Member
It's very sandy on the crossings in there. I really hope it wasn't as simple as letting the tyres down.
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
Absolutely & cant agree with this enough.

"Make sure your preparations are right, make sure that you carry plenty of water, excess water and equipment to get you out of a bog if you do get stuck."

I'd add taking at least a couple of days of food as well.

It is a sad & a horrible thing to have happen but totally avoidable!

People have to stop thinking they are just going for a Sunday drive when going bush & expecially in country like that.

Always carry a PLB to!

This is even if you have a more capable 4x4 & with recovery gear.

It's very sandy on the crossings in there. I really hope it wasn't as simple as letting the tyres down.

Even just carrying a set of treds could have helped but still you need to think worst case senario all the time imo.
 

billolga

Well-Known Member
I drove through the Boggy Hole years ago & at the southern end found a japanese man pushing a Bike through the sandy Ernest Giles Road (Short cut from Kings Canyon to the Stuart Hwy). He had no water & wanted to "Buy it from us" - We gave him as much as he could carry & contacted a truck heading his way & asked them to give him a lift.
 

mikehzz

Well-Known Member
It was an X-Trail. They're ok in sand if you know how to drive them and you let the tyres down. To run out of water in only a day or so is a mistake for sure.
 

Toddyh

Well-Known Member
Having driven an xtrail myself in this area I'm confident in saying it absolutely would make it through with the appropriate knowledge and experience. So sad that a lack of this two things has cost this bloke his life.
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
We’ve had cruisers bogged in there. Late in the season when the bull dust gets thick along the river bank it can be very difficult. As the report stated it looks like the poor bugger was following google maps to get from one place to the next and might have had no clue what he was in for. RIP.
 

Colly18

Well-Known Member
Such a sad story. I won’t judge his actions. RIP fella.
So sad! Unfortunately people getting stranded, or lost, and dying in Central Australia occurs too often i.m.o.
We make our own decisions based on what knowledge we have and what risks we are willing to take. But cases like this lead me to wonder whether more needs to be done (or can be done) by way of induction for anyone moving to or holidaying there?
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
So sad! Unfortunately people getting stranded, or lost, and dying in Central Australia occurs too often i.m.o.
We make our own decisions based on what knowledge we have and what risks we are willing to take. But cases like this lead me to wonder whether more needs to be done (or can be done) by way of induction for anyone moving to or holidaying there?

As sad and tragic as this is I don’t agree with nannyising it. If you go to these harsh outback areas you need to take responsibility yourself and be aware and be prepared accordingly
I remember speaking with one of the local shop owners in the vicinity, an older lady in her late 60’s and she made the comment about tourists not respecting the area and it’s conditions thinking they are still in the big smoke
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
As sad and tragic as this is I don’t agree with nannyising it. If you go to these harsh outback areas you need to take responsibility yourself and be aware and be prepared accordingly
I remember speaking with one of the local shop owners in the vicinity, an older lady in her late 60’s and she made the comment about tourists not respecting the area and it’s conditions thinking they are still in the big smoke
Agree 100% but there needs to be better education to make evreyone who hasn't been 4wding for years aware of the extreme conditions and dangers involved in traveling into these areas
 

SirDrinksalott

Active Member
I agree there is enough awareness if you are sensible/risk aware but it is too easy to end up like this bloke if you are inexperienced and believe the hype you see on youtube.

Back in the UK the first 4x4 I got was a Disco and just fking around put it in 4wd low and pointed it at a wet grass slope and thought this thing would eat it. Didnt even know about letting the tyres down, AT/Off Road Tyres and what a Disco is actually capable of.

Finding that your vehicle isnt so wonderful when you are miles from anywhere with no water is a harsh lesson!

That said, its not a nanny state and I hope it never becomes one, perhaps some of the locals should have taken his wheels off because if the nanny state gets up it will be us who lose out because of this guys death.
 

Hoyks

Well-Known Member
Its all a lot of speculation about if he was prepared or not, but no one here has found the guys vehicle know exactly how prepared he was and know what exactly transpired.
He has been kicking around Australia for several years, so this might not be his first trip into the unknown either, more than a few tourists manage to pack more experience out in the sticks into their couple of years here than most Aussies do in a life time.

It was stinking hot out there and heat exhaustion/stroke can sneak up on you rather quickly if working hard in hot conditions. Its not uncommon for people to go down with heat illness and have ready access to water or full water bottles. If you're working hard and not acclimatized to the conditions or just forget to drink because you're so task focused, you can easily get in a situation where you're guzzling water, but still not keeping up.
Then you get nausea & vomiting and no matter how much water you put away you can't keep it down and spiral further down and only IV fluids will bring you back.

I've gone down with heat illness twice, both times I had plenty of water on hand, but was working my arse off in the heat with time critical jobs that had to be done and changing priorities. A lot going on, I thought I was drinking enough, but just wasn't getting the time to sit down and pour a water bottle down my neck.
I had 2 x 3/4 full jerries arms length away, but still ended up in hospital on a drip.

The X-trail isn't a bad car on the sand, but you need to air down and turn off the Traction Control as it can hamper your progress and over heat if over worked, but even competent drivers get stuck sometimes.

So its not outside the realms of possibility that he just keeled over from dehydration while trying to un-bog his entrail in the heat of the day from the dry, bottomless sand in the creek bed. It might have been as simple as kicking back under a tree and waiting until 5pm and then giving another go.

The coroners report might be worth a read.
 
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