Mansfield police again.

phs

Well-Known Member
I believe all that were tested were alcohol and drug free.
So what's your point?
Looks like the cops had to find something to justify what they reckon was saving lives?
Given they were in a remote location what if someone blew over on a prelim breath test how are they going to take them to the closest station for breath analysis test within the required 2 hours ?
 

rogerazz

4x4 Earth Contributer
Given they were in a remote location what if someone blew over on a prelim breath test how are they going to take them to the closest station for breath analysis test within the required 2 hours ?
Why don't you ask the police who said that they tested the drivers?
 

CTL

Well-Known Member
Given they were in a remote location what if someone blew over on a prelim breath test how are they going to take them to the closest station for breath analysis test within the required 2 hours ?
Mobile testing station. They are always used when conducting these types of operations. The calibrated breath analysis equipment is not big and can be easily carried by one person. I would assume it would be carried in a support vehicle and parked at a central location. Not necessary to go to a “station”.
 

2luxes

Well-Known Member
It's unbelievable that these idiots get away with the same thing over and over. The law is garbage. Lock them up for a while and they become hardened criminals. Treat them as they do and they repeat the offence the minute they leave the courtroom.
The law is not garbage. The problem is the amount of prison cells they have to work with.

Back in the days when I worked in the system, gaols were always full and still are today. The number going in each day closely matches the number going out.

I used to occassionally look at the annual court statistics for NSW on my computer. There were just over 120,000 convictions for one particular year. The gaols at that time had about 10,000 cells.
 

Swaggie

Moderator
The law is not garbage. The problem is the amount of prison cells they have to work with.

Back in the days when I worked in the system, gaols were always full and still are today. The number going in each day closely matches the number going out.

I used to occassionally look at the annual court statistics for NSW on my computer. There were just over 120,000 convictions for one particular year. The gaols at that time had about 10,000 cells.
When was the last time either Party said we have a real problem handing out good behavior bonds like toilet paper time and time again because the system is full and BUILT MORE JAILS…..;)
 
Oof. This thread has been an interesting read.

Not to comment on anything else but I reckon if you're doing a full SAS job then it should be signed off by an engineer.

I don't know where the line is for modifications that need inspecting, but it's somewhere south of axle swaps. There MUST be some standards that get enforced on the roads.

I don't think our road standards are super limiting.... maybe another inch over stadard tyres is all I'd ask for.
 
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Rusty Panels

Well-Known Member
They now have to do 200 hours, which is a big improvement.
It's a great idea that they can now get their L's at the age of 16 instead of the old days where they had to be 16 years and 9 months. It's also a good idea that they have to keep a log book and show how many hours were done at night, in bright sunshine, in the rain at night/day etc. But, I wonder how many of those log book entries are legitimate? I saw an ad on the side of a Driving School vehicle recently that said "Book a lesson with us and get an bonus 20 hours on your log book". I've got no idea whether that meant that they will give you 20 hours of lessons for free or whether they will fudge the figures.
I have said for years that the drivers on our roads are getting worse! I still believe that. I reckon that part of the problem is modern vehicles themselves. When I was a young bloke you'd get behind the wheel of an old Falcon or Kingswood and drive down the road. If you overstepped the mark and went around a bend too fast the trusty Kingswood would soon let you know and you'd find yourself correcting your mistake and eventually become pretty good at handling a car. Nowadays your car has all these hi tech safety devices that can apply brakes and tug on your steering wheel and correct things for you. The problem with all that is that you have no real idea of either the car's or your own limitations. Because these modern vehicles do all of the thinking for us and handle so much better than the old Kingswood when they do "let go" it's often in a big way.
I reckon that some sort of advanced driving course should be made affordable and compulsory. It would probably pay the insurance companies and car manufacturers to sponsor this type of training and it may well save a few lives too.
 

Toyasaurus

Well-Known Member
Don`t forget Valiant`s.

The other thing is most kids and a lot of adults wouldn`t know the first thing about what they are driving.
Ask most people how the difference in handling between the different drive systems is very few could give you a full answer.

From what I have seen if you asked most kids what type of drive the car has that they are in most would fail.

Driver distraction is one of the biggest pain in the ass problems on the roads these days.
A lot of drivers treat driving as the 3rd or 4th most important thing to do whilst driving.
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
It's a great idea that they can now get their L's at the age of 16 instead of the old days where they had to be 16 years and 9 months. It's also a good idea that they have to keep a log book and show how many hours were done at night, in bright sunshine, in the rain at night/day etc. But, I wonder how many of those log book entries are legitimate? I saw an ad on the side of a Driving School vehicle recently that said "Book a lesson with us and get an bonus 20 hours on your log book". I've got no idea whether that meant that they will give you 20 hours of lessons for free or whether they will fudge the figures.
I have said for years that the drivers on our roads are getting worse! I still believe that. I reckon that part of the problem is modern vehicles themselves. When I was a young bloke you'd get behind the wheel of an old Falcon or Kingswood and drive down the road. If you overstepped the mark and went around a bend too fast the trusty Kingswood would soon let you know and you'd find yourself correcting your mistake and eventually become pretty good at handling a car. Nowadays your car has all these hi tech safety devices that can apply brakes and tug on your steering wheel and correct things for you. The problem with all that is that you have no real idea of either the car's or your own limitations. Because these modern vehicles do all of the thinking for us and handle so much better than the old Kingswood when they do "let go" it's often in a big way.
I reckon that some sort of advanced driving course should be made affordable and compulsory. It would probably pay the insurance companies and car manufacturers to sponsor this type of training and it may well save a few lives too.
I have an L plater and have just spent most of Easter with him clocking up hours. Yes, they need defensive driving once they have the basics happening, so that they can set a car up for a corner. Yes the electronics in modern cars fight you to set up a corner wide, apex, and accelerate through. I ended up turning them off to help him learn the basics of setting up a corner. It is a double edged sword though, because the electronics are what I want working at all times when he eventually heads out on his own. They might give you the sh!ts some times, but they will save your life more often than not. It isn’t a winnable argument from any perspective IMHO and neither view is flawless.
Driving lessons with a school (in QLD at least) are worth double hours towards your license (1 hr with an instructor = 2 hrs logged) which makes sense, and gives parents a good motivation to get their kids some lessons.
Every trip we do with the learner in logged via an app which notes start times, odometer readings etc - if they had mapping as well it would be dam near unfudgeable. Each trip is sent to the nominated supervisor to be signed off.
 
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cam04

Well-Known Member
Driving instructors do not teach you driving skills and safety skills. They just help you to get a driver's licence.
You need to go to a specialist school and do a defensive and Advanced driving course.
I well understand the difference between the two. I was paid to do advanced driver training at Mt Cotton yearly as part of my government job. You might be amazed to know that the driving school we are using is all about developing skills to a point where it is worthwhile enrolling in a defensive driving course. I did not intimate that they were one and the same.
 

Lost1?

Well-Known Member
Having grown up in the country and learning to drive on dirt roads is a great start point. A low grip surface that will make you learn how to drive without moving at high speeds. Especially when the red dirt gets wet and turns to clay. Bit similar to driving on a skid pan, only with a greater variation in traction.

Teaching my child to drive these days. Unfortunately I lacked the time to take them back to where i grew up when they first started to learn to drive. Whilst general driving skills are good enough, there are some lapses in concentration that make me think not just yet. Living in Melbourne a couple of drives into the city and the obligatory hook turn, dealing with tram stops etc will be essential so I don.t have a 6 oclock news moment of our own. We are not only investing in their ability to look after themselves but other road users too.
 

rogerazz

4x4 Earth Contributer
I believe that anyone a going for a licence, no matter what age should by law, have to do a defensive/advanced driving course.
 

phs

Well-Known Member
Mobile testing station. They are always used when conducting these types of operations. The calibrated breath analysis equipment is not big and can be easily carried by one person. I would assume it would be carried in a support vehicle and parked at a central location. Not necessary to go to a “station”.
Central to where they are in deep bush land on motor bikes they can’t just ask the drunk guy to jump on the back they need a booze bus or station

sorry but given where they were not an easy task
 

rogerazz

4x4 Earth Contributer
rogerazz said:
Mobile testing station. They are always used when conducting these types of operations. The calibrated breath analysis equipment is not big and can be easily carried by one person. I would assume it would be carried in a support vehicle and parked at a central location. Not necessary to go to a “station

Central to where they are in deep bush land on motor bikes they can’t just ask the drunk guy to jump on the back they need a booze bus or station

sorry but given where they were not an easy task
I did not make that comment ,@CTL said that.
 
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phs

Well-Known Member
rogerazz said:
Mobile testing station. They are always used when conducting these types of operations. The calibrated breath analysis equipment is not big and can be easily carried by one person. I would assume it would be carried in a support vehicle and parked at a central location. Not necessary to go to a “station


I did not make that comment ,@CTL said that.
Sorry mate, it was directed @CTL I linked the wrong quote lol

One too many beers ! But I am camped up for the night no drink driving here getting caught or not it will catch up with you one way or another eventually
 
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