Looking for recommendations - two burner portable stove.

Ol' Harley

Member
Afternoon folks,

As the rain tumbles down outside and the creeks rise, I've been going over the camping gear, and my old two burner stove is fast approaching the end of it's life. While we often take a camper trailer with its own cooker, every now and then we'll just set up swags under an awning next to the car. When we do that, we use a simple two-burner stove to cook on.

The one I have has just about had it, and its time for an upgrade. Been looking at this sort of thing
Coleman Hyperflame
or something like it as a replacement. Whatever one I pick, it's gotta be two burner, preferably with a good wind shield, and a bonus would be a case.

If anyone has any experience / thoughts on these, I'd be happy to listen.

Cheers folks!
 

LongRoad2Go

Active Member
I have the Coleman Classic - the one with side wind shields and use a match to light it. Have had it for decades, bomb proof and EASY to clean - even used it for a week or two inside the house when the kitchen was out of action because of renovations. The wind shields proved useful in typically windy areas e.g. Warrumbungles and Mt Kaputar. BTU and efficiency wise = excellent.

The Coleman Hyperflame looks impressive with the BTU value too. Those burner wind shields could be a cleaning issue e.g. boil overs, after frying snags, etc?

I reckon any Coleman would do the job well.

Also, I fully recommend getting the Coleman Hyperflame carry bag (grey and orange one) - got one recently when my old black one crapped itself (was never a good one anyway.) The grey and orange bag is good quality.
 
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Triton14

Well-Known Member
You dont have to spend a lot unless you want to & imo wind shields are a must.
I have 3 camp stoves, one is a good old cheap gasmate, great little unit, simple, works!

One of the other ones has a grill as well & its the one that gets taken on most occasions, looks very much like this unit
Nothing like cooking your burgers while toasting your nice milk buns :)

I recon depending on your need & duration I like the idea of having an oven as well, but maybe that would then be considered "glamping" :D

If I didnt just buy a 12V oven I would consider the above as a good extended camping solution & you dont have to worry about recharging batteries!
 

cookie64

4x4 Earth Contributer
I have bought and used so many different types and manufacturers of Gas Stoves over the years and took the $20 specials all over the place but they are drastically affected by wind, however slight.

I replaced them all with the Coleman Hyperflame and haven't looked back, I first used it in a remote area a few years ago which the wind blew up just in time for me to cook, the wind really didn't affect it and my food cooked quickly and with minimal gas use as the heat isn't lost when the wind blows.

There is a minor modification to do but it is very simple.


Both of my daughters have a Hyperflame now and they love it too

cheers
 

LongRoad2Go

Active Member
I have bought and used so many different types and manufacturers of Gas Stoves over the years and took the $20 specials all over the place but they are drastically affected by wind, however slight.

I replaced them all with the Coleman Hyperflame and haven't looked back, I first used it in a remote area a few years ago which the wind blew up just in time for me to cook, the wind really didn't affect it and my food cooked quickly and with minimal gas use as the heat isn't lost when the wind blows.

There is a minor modification to do but it is very simple.


Both of my daughters have a Hyperflame now and they love it too

cheers

That's a very easy fix, though I'd be careful using certain types of lubricant e.g. Inox, unless reading the MSDS sheet as some can affect rubber/plastic components e.g. the spindle appeared to have rubber o-rings on it.
 
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cookie64

4x4 Earth Contributer
That's a very easy fix, though I'd be careful using certain types of lubricant e.g. Inox, unless reading the MSDS sheet as some can affect rubber/plastic components e.g. the spindle appeared to have rubber o-rings on it.
I used Silicone Spray and it has served me well for the last couple of years

Hope this helps

cheers
 

muffin man

Well-Known Member
We have a Coleman Hyperflame....got through credit card rewards. It's good except in windy conditions the lid locking latch can move meaning the lid might drop down. Lots of complaints about being too hot. It starts hot but after a minute or so it's easily turned down to a simmer. It is big so consider where to pack. The legs can be slippery on a table, easily fixed with a rubber mat. Great for frying or wet dishes.
 

Colly18

Well-Known Member
After using a couple cheaper stoves quite successfully over a few decades we recently purchased a Companion High Output 2 burner stove. We escaped home last week and got to give the new stove a good test run over 6 days. It's a 5-star rating from us on this one. No case, but the missus made up a material cover for it, to help keep it free of scratches and dust. There are plenty of good reviews online.

 

red hilux

Well-Known Member
If your using your stove in very cold climates, your best off buying the dual fuel stoves.
These don’t suffer from the cold, plus you don’t need to carry gas bottle

 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
After using a couple cheaper stoves quite successfully over a few decades we recently purchased a Companion High Output 2 burner stove. We escaped home last week and got to give the new stove a good test run over 6 days. It's a 5-star rating from us on this one. No case, but the missus made up a material cover for it, to help keep it free of scratches and dust. There are plenty of good reviews online.


That is the one we have but red when it was branded Primus, we have had it for about 7 years I just keep ours in a pillow case
I chose that one because it is compact, has a high BTU and easy clean interior. Haven’t looked at what other options are now available but are very happy with it
 

Ol' Harley

Member
If your using your stove in very cold climates, your best off buying the dual fuel stoves.
These don’t suffer from the cold, plus you don’t need to carry gas bottle
Not a bad idea. We've tended to try and avoid camping in really cold weather as we get older as the wife ("Yes Dear...") isn't fond of it, and I'm starting to feel the creaks a little myself. But it is a thought worth considering, thanks.
 

CTL

Well-Known Member
That is the one we have but red when it was branded Primus, we have had it for about 7 years I just keep ours in a pillow case
I chose that one because it is compact, has a high BTU and easy clean interior. Haven’t looked at what other options are now available but are very happy with it
Same as ^^^^^
 

cookie64

4x4 Earth Contributer
If your using your stove in very cold climates, your best off buying the dual fuel stoves.
These don’t suffer from the cold, plus you don’t need to carry gas bottle

A friend of mine has one of those, works very well, you still need to carry fuel though but yes less susceptible to ultra cold temperatures

cheers
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
If your using your stove in very cold climates, your best off buying the dual fuel stoves.
These don’t suffer from the cold, plus you don’t need to carry gas bottle

Just use a LPG stove VS a butane mix stove & problem solved for extreme cold or normal use.
One fuel, LPG.
 
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hulsty

Active Member
I've used the Coleman Triton for the last 5 or so years. I picked it over others as it is physically smaller and the option plate, packs up inside.

 
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