Lets get this discussion started!

discomatt

Well-Known Member
Good tires is the biggest requirement, I do at least 1 snow drive each season, once and only once I left the all terrains on, never again because I could hardly even stop on a down hill section.
Really soft snow lower pressure, icy snow harder pressure.
Thats all I have except maybe the obvious, warm clothes plus a full change just in case
 

Bomber2012

Well-Known Member
If you are considering driving in snow it is wise to carry chains .
Conditions in snow can vary greatly , conditions can change within 500m from easy to uncontrollable depending how much sun / shade that section of track gets .
Our mate @Mr Rum lost his life driving in snow , for the cost of hiring or buying chains it is cheap insurance .
It’s not to be taken lightly.
 

Baggs71

Active Member
So far for snow driving we have:
2x no for ATs
1x tyre pressures
1x snow chains
1x dont go alone if possible
1x prior experience recommended
 
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peterfermtech

Well-Known Member
This topic done to death on many occasions. I will however add one thing. Two years ago before our lockdown I invested in some Falken Wildpeak AT3W's. They come with the 3 peak badge and short of dedicated snow tyres I would rank them far and above any other tyre I have used in the snow from fresh dry powder to slush and ice. Sipings is what gives you traction in the snow not blocks of rubber.
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
This topic done to death on many occasions. I will however add one thing. Two years ago before our lockdown I invested in some Falken Wildpeak AT3W's. They come with the 3 peak badge and short of dedicated snow tyres I would rank them far and above any other tyre I have used in the snow from fresh dry powder to slush and ice. Sipings is what gives you traction in the snow not blocks of rubber.
Just had a look at them, excellent reviews except for those who put wear as a main priority, for me that is near the bottom and overall grip in all conditions is the top priority
 

hulsty

Active Member
I've done a lot of snow driving up to some reasonably deep snow. Very similar to driving in Sand, we use aggressive mud tyres. Key is no wheel spin. Drive, constantly adjusting to stop wheel spin, when you stop, back up and go again.
 

phs

Well-Known Member
This topic done to death on many occasions. I will however add one thing. Two years ago before our lockdown I invested in some Falken Wildpeak AT3W's. They come with the 3 peak badge and short of dedicated snow tyres I would rank them far and above any other tyre I have used in the snow from fresh dry powder to slush and ice. Sipings is what gives you traction in the snow not blocks of rubber.

There are a few AT tyres running The 3 peak symbol
Including the ones we use duratrac wranglers they get very good reviews in the states for snow driving
 

SFA hilux

Active Member
Snow driving is my favourite of all fwdriving.
I have only done it in fresh powder though.
I have only ever had MTs but I’ve been driving with other vehicles with ATs, if any one of us is struggling for traction it always comes down to there tyre pressure, lower the better on snow.
I think AT are actually better in fresh powder because you actually want snow to stick on your tyres, opposite to mud, because snow sticks to snow.
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
By far to me it's about how you drive.
Most of my snow driving has been on standard road tyres & mostly without chains.
Low to mid range rpms to decrease tyre spin, no sharp/hard sudden breaking, slow pumping of brakes etc.
It's made a bit easier with cars with ABS but still once you get into a slide even with ABS it could be all over.
 
Done a bit of snow driving over the years when it was affordable to ski.

One memorable occasion three of us were in a Subaru Forrester and got a surprising waive through by the Police/RTA after heavy snow closed the road between Sawpit Creek and the Guthega Road turnoff – only 4WD’s were allowed access. Had AT tyres and no chains on. Vehicle is a manual with hi/lo range.

We turned off onto the Guthega Road, following someone in a red Hilux. The Hilux kept hitting their brakes – bad idea, always use low range and gears.

On a particularly steep section on a downhill run to a creek crossing, the Hilux driver hit the brakes, slid uncontrolled down the road, and VERY LUCKILY, impacted a snow drift. The drift stopped the vehicle from plummeting into a deep creek. We drove past and made sure they were okay and continued on. The male passenger was ‘comforting’ the female driver.;)

Snow is easy, black ice on the other hand makes my sack retract!:eek:
 
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Ol' Harley

New Member
I'd like to add a little to this one with respect to lights...

I live in the Central West of NSW, and driving home from work this moring - still dark - there was snow falling, and a stiff wind swirling it around.

I have a small high-intensity LED lightbar fitted to the bullbar, and switching it on resulted in something that wouldn't have been out of place in Star Wars, when one of the spaceships went into hyperspace. LOTS of long straight white lines driving right at you, no matter which way the road took you.

Turning off the lightbar made it easier to see in the blizzard-like conditions, and switching off the high beam - low beam only - gave me the clearest vision, because I wasn't getting all of my own light bounced back at me off the falling snow.

We all get caught up in the debate about the best / brightest / longest range lights for the front (and back) of our 4WD's, but sometimes, less is better.

Oh, and slow down - you might be an old hand at driving in the snow, but there's always the chance you'll encounter that tourist in a rented car who has never driven in snow before coming the other way.
 
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