Land Rover Discovery 3

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
Had a little bit of a suspension knock in the rear for a while due to worn sway bar bushes. Replaced them with some superpro bushes and all is good now. Normally for the suspension arms replacement bushes are best left to factory rubber ones as the likes of superpro bushes there transmit a noticeable amount of harshness through from the road. Theres no issues with using them in the sway bars however and I now have superpro bushes in both the front and rear sway bars. I've only got the front upper arms with original bushes left as all the others have been replaced by me since I've owned the D3
 
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Deleted member 69390

Guest
I have the same rattle from the rear of my RRS (D3 equivalent) so I might do the same - are the bushes you used specifically for the D3 or did you just get a set of the same size.

My front lower suspension arms probably also need doing but it is easier (and cheaper) to just replace the entire arms sourced from the UK.
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
For the front and rear sway bars theres about 3 different size ones available to suit different diameter bars. I would guess that the RRS would have thicker bars so you'd have to check the sizing.
The replacment arms would work out cheaper if your paying someone else to do it as the saving is all in labour. But if your capable to rebushing them yourself then bushes should be heaps cheaper. I've ordered new arms for the ones I've done and kept the old ones - plan to rebush them when the need arises for the next time
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
I've now changed all suspension bushes since I've had my disco with the front upper arms being replaced today.
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Deleted member 69390

Guest
I am aware of the symptoms of worn lower control arms, what symptoms did you have for the top arms. A wheel alignment is needed after doing the lower arms, does the same apply to the upper arms? Are the rears similar to do as the fronts?
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
Like new again
How hard is it to do yourself?
Not really all that hard if your handy with the spanners. Hardest bolt is the top front as there's not a lot of access to get a decent turn on the nut. And it removal and replace you need to stick your arm up behind the spring and work blind.
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
I am aware of the symptoms of worn lower control arms, what symptoms did you have for the top arms. A wheel alignment is needed after doing the lower arms, does the same apply to the upper arms? Are the rears similar to do as the fronts?
In hindsight there was a little bit of suspension noise before hand, but I mainly picked it at my last tyre rotation - thought I had a shot wheel bearing as there was some excessive movement at the wheel - turns out that was the flogged out bush. The upper arms are not adjustable so shouldn't be much change from previous, unlike the lower arms which are used for alignment adjustments. Same deal at the back.
 
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Deleted member 69390

Guest
In hindsight there was a little bit of suspension noise before hand, but I mainly picked it at my last tyre rotation - thought I had a shot wheel bearing as there was some excessive movement at the wheel - turns out that was the flogged out bush. The upper arms are not adjustable so shouldn't be much change from previous, unlike the lower arms which are used for alignment adjustments. Same deal at the back.
Thanks - great information.
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
Thanks - great information.
Actually, forgot to add that you may need to recalibrate the suspension heights afterwards as the height sensor needs to be disconnected from the arms during replacement. I had the front left sitting a little higher than normal so a recal on my IID tool was required to reset the suspension height to normal
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
nope, fronts got replaced around 3 years ago at 175000km due to a leak in the front right bag and the rears where done last year at 256000km due to worn shocks
 
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Deleted member 69390

Guest
Thanks for the info. Are you still on the original air shocks?

Well actually to be pedantic the Disco does not have air shocks - they actually have normal hydraulic/oil shocks - they have air springs - in the suspension strut the shock is the same as most other cars but instead of a coil metal spring they have a air bag that acts like a spring wrapped around the shock.
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
And its easier to replace the complete unit rather than stripping the bag off the strut to replace one or the other
 

muc the truck

Well-Known Member
Thanks for that :)

WOW...I didn't realise that they had 26k service intervals, for some people that's nearly 1 service every 2yrs !! That's something that I'd be doing on a bit more of a regular basis.....
With myself having 2 older LR's (D1 & Defender) - servicing is something that is done by myself and therefore is fairly cheap whereas the missus's Prado 150 that we have bought from new and always pay to get serviced - has been the most expensive car we have owned to date.... and this is what concerns me with the more modern vehicles as in paying for the servicing..... Doing something wrong with these new modern Diesels when it comes to servicing is one of my big fears.....

rob
Any car that has extremely long service intervals often becomes problematic out of warranty . I still would change oil and filters every 10,000. I think its a sales pitch and gamble on warranty to sell more cars . A few brands do this .
 

muc the truck

Well-Known Member
dodged a bullet of a cooked engine - anyone with a modern rig will be familar with the amount of plastic parts in the cooling systems. I've been chasing a coolant leak for a little while, I could smell the coolant but couldnt find where it was coming from until recently. Looked to be coming from the join between a hose and a plastic elbow. Ordered a new hose set, which lucky for me come with the plastic elbow as when I removed the hose the elbow broke with very little force. So seems I found the source of the leak, but I dont think it was far from complete failure
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Any time you have a coolant leak and cant find it go to your local radiator shop and they can pressure your system , you will see the leak immediately . its better than risk. Takes about 5 minutes
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
Any time you have a coolant leak and cant find it go to your local radiator shop and they can pressure your system , you will see the leak immediately . its better than risk. Takes about 5 minutes
I try to avoid the local mechanics here, they charge way to much for the service you get, and I find it more enjoyable to do it myself. I find these things eventally
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
Any car that has extremely long service intervals often becomes problematic out of warranty . I still would change oil and filters every 10,000. I think its a sales pitch and gamble on warranty to sell more cars . A few brands do this .
Do some oil sampling and you may be surprised at the condition of the oil at 10,000 vs 20,000km
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
Yes but eventually might be too late and then its way way way too much $$$
Run the risk of this sort of stuff happening with older cars - The D3 is 13 years old now and approaching 300,000km on the odo so just part and parcel of the deal IMHO
 
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