Joining cable

Komang

Active Member
Hi guys
What is the best tool/equipment to joint cable /branch it ?
Exs from 6mm to 3pcs 3mm cable
Thankyou
 

Rusty Panels

Well-Known Member
I only ever solder connections unless it's an emergency.
What I normally do is to bare a 20-30mm section of the main cable and twist to spread the wires and then feed the bared end of the branch cable through and twist it together then solder the joint and cover the branch with heat shrink spaghetti.
I have never had a connection fail in any application.
Your wire all needs to be good clean copper though to get solder to flow properly.
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
I personally prefer crimping, although I will solder certain things. Crimping however I recommend using quality crimpers like these:
5145qantsZL._AC_SL1000_.jpg
and not the cheap shit ones like these:
Capture.JPG
Other option is would could run your larger feed cable to a busbar or fuse box and then run the smaller cables from that
 

Komang

Active Member
Hi Rusty,
Thanks for advice will try it this weekend will inform you the result.
Hi Shane yes I do think use bus bar but will but not work do space but thanks.
 

Rusty Panels

Well-Known Member
Some of the crimp connectors are ok but it is pretty common for them to cause issues at some point. As your wiring gets older you get a bit of degradation of the copper and you can develop what is called a high resistance joint. That can then develop into a hard to find problem. As I said if you can solder a join you are way better off. I even solder spade and eye terminals. A little bit of heat from your iron on the terminal and you can slide the heat shrink off and put it onto your wire put the wire into the crimp hole and solder it in while it's still hot you slip the heat shrink back on and Bob's your uncle.
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
Every join is different but generally I use these sorts of connectors with a couple of additional heat shrinks over the top.


All depends where it is really, no joins are the same, depends on the situation & position.

I've used O ring connectors on each side & jointed with a small bolt & then heat shrunk over it as well.

At times used blade connections to.

Totally depends of the situation & location
 

Decca

Active Member
I use these sorts of connectors
Interesting product T14. Not sure what the soldering material is.
I checked the MSDS and Magnesium Hydroxide is the only 'metal' I could see... and it's used as a laxative or antacid. ???


Re soldering Vs crimping.. as others have said; depends.
Either method is ok if done well but If the wire is subject to any movement then I usually crimp.
 

idiomatically

Well-Known Member
It shouldn't be a crimp vs solder discussion, it should be both, you crimp then flood with solder. The idea of crimping is to create a cold weld, most crappy tools people use are not able to achieve this.

A proper cold weld will perform better than a soldered joint, however, a soldered joint will always perform better than a crappy crimp. To be safe I always recommend people to buy themselves decent crimp tools and then always flood it with solder to be sure. I have been doing this all my life since Dad taught me and I have never had issues.
 

Rusty Panels

Well-Known Member
Whenever possible you don't want wires to move. Wiring should be fairly secure and protected from sharp edges. I would definitely avoid any joins in wiring that moves. By that I mean wires that are hanging in mid air like from the engine to the body. Any joins or connections like that are more prone to failure from vibration.
 

Komang

Active Member
Had done all the wire from second battery from the back of the tub approx 7mtr 6mm twin core cable to passenger kick panel
Split wire and solder done as Rusty advice (1 pc 6mm to 3pcs 4mm cable) one of them goes to middle console (cig plug) to power the cooler.
BUT notice loosing voltage can not use high on the cooler only the low voltage only.
Do you guys think this from the length of the cable or the connection ?
Thanks
 

FrankP

Active Member
Had done all the wire from second battery from the back of the tub approx 7mtr 6mm twin core cable to passenger kick panel
Split wire and solder done as Rusty advice (1 pc 6mm to 3pcs 4mm cable) one of them goes to middle console (cig plug) to power the cooler.
BUT notice loosing voltage can not use high on the cooler only the low voltage only.
Do you guys think this from the length of the cable or the connection ?
Thanks

Voltage drop depends on current, wire gauge and wire length.

For a given current, to maintain an acceptable voltage drop you can have thin wire if the cable run is short. The longer the run, the larger the cable required.

You say you're using a "Cooler". Is that one of those cooler/warmer solid state things, not a compressor fridge? If so, they pull a fair current - 10 or more amps, where an average fridge on High might pull 5 amps.

When you say 6mm cable, I presume you're talking in automotive terms where 6mm means the diameter of the cable, including insulation. Cheap Chinese cable has more plastic and less copper, so you lose out electrically, though your pocket wins.

A better measure of cable is gauge in AWG or B&S, which describe how large the conductor is. Also there is sq mm. 6sqmm copper conductor is a lot different from 6mm auto cable which may have only a couple of sq mm of copper conductor.

So to answer your question directly, I think you connections are probably ok. Your problem is the long cable run and wire that is too skinny.

7m of twin core gives you a circuit length of 14 meters. If I were you I would be using 8AWG for the supply to the fridge socket and take the negative from the fridge socket to the closest possible chassis earth, like a seat mounting bolt (clean the paint off first.) That way you reduce the length of the circuit. 8AWG will be good enough for any type of fridge you're likely to have.

Also, cig plugs are notoriously unreliable. It is likely it will jiggle itelf into a state of poor connection and either run hot or disconnect itself (and your fridge) altogether. You'd be better off to install a Merrit socket on the car and convert the fridge lead to Merrit plug.

Merit plug: https://www.jaycar.com.au/merit-plug/p/PP2090
 

Komang

Active Member
Hi Frank
Not sure it a good cable or not
It Tycab 6mm tween sheeted rated 50A in their description.
Yes it one of the cooler and warmer just run it if we go to picnic or long drive too keep the drink cool.
You right the cig socket didnt do good job
I probably will need to add the merit socket like you said.
Thankyou.
 

Corndoggy

Well-Known Member
The cable might be rated at 50 amps but it could be for 1 or 2 meter run. In saying that you could run the cable 50mtrs and draw 50 amps but end up with 6 volts at the end (figures just example). Seeing you have already run the cable you could try joining both cores together as your +ve supply from your battery to your take of point and then, as said take your -ve from a close chassis point. If its what I looked at it's about 5mm2 so would give you 10mm2 cable and 15 amps ok. Otherwise run a bigger cable.
 
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Komang

Active Member
Will try again this weekend and chek the voltage where is drop point
Thank guys will keep postage
 

FrankP

Active Member
Hi Frank
Not sure it a good cable or not
It Tycab 6mm tween sheeted rated 50A in their description.
Yes it one of the cooler and warmer just run it if we go to picnic or long drive too keep the drink cool.
You right the cig socket didnt do good job
I probably will need to add the merit socket like you said.
Thankyou.
I think the cable quality is ok, just underspecced for the length of the circuit and the load.
 

Bru9

Active Member
It shouldn't be a crimp vs solder discussion, it should be both, you crimp then flood with solder. The idea of crimping is to create a cold weld, most crappy tools people use are not able to achieve this.

A proper cold weld will perform better than a soldered joint, however, a soldered joint will always perform better than a crappy crimp. To be safe I always recommend people to buy themselves decent crimp tools and then always flood it with solder to be sure. I have been doing this all my life since Dad taught me and I have never had issues.
Sorry mate but made in china tools dirt cheap are now on par with entry level quality brands, just like ando plugs, heatshrink, list goes on. My $16 ebay ratchet style 16mm2 crimper has done well north of 300 crimps on tough 6-25mm2 lugs ( the ones you cant possible bend by hand). I have tested about a dozen of the crimps over its life and every crimp passed the UL tensile strength and solder gas tight test with flying colours.
Amazing little tool.

Sick of paying a premium for no extra benefit.
 

MrMiller

Active Member
I assume the cables are going to be run under the interior trim? Not likely much movement so if it were me I’d be soldering the joins and heat shrinking obviously. Why drop cable size though? I’d just run 6mm the whole way. That drop in size cable might be causing the voltage drop? Not the connection or quality of cable?
 
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