Jackaroo roof rack loading

The drivers handbook for my 2003 Jackaroo SE states a maximum
roof loading of 50kg including the roof rack weight and it states
that if very rough tracks are being travelled that loading should be
reduced to 25kg.

This seems a very low limit to me.

Now, I appreciate that when a vehicle is in motion there will be
"shock" loadings on the roof rack which may equate to (guessing)
two or three times the static load and perhaps Holden (Isuzu) are
just being cautious?

My reason for asking is that I am considering a roof top tent but
as the tent weighs about 50kg I'll have to diet down to about 5kg
in order to be in their weight range and I don't think I'm going to
do that :)

Any comments from people with experience of Jackaroos (post
1995 ish) and roof racks?

MH
 

camperman2010

New Member
The drivers handbook for my 2003 Jackaroo SE states a maximum
roof loading of 50kg including the roof rack weight and it states
that if very rough tracks are being travelled that loading should be
reduced to 25kg.

This seems a very low limit to me.

Now, I appreciate that when a vehicle is in motion there will be
"shock" loadings on the roof rack which may equate to (guessing)
two or three times the static load and perhaps Holden (Isuzu) are
just being cautious?

My reason for asking is that I am considering a roof top tent but
as the tent weighs about 50kg I'll have to diet down to about 5kg
in order to be in their weight range and I don't think I'm going to
do that :)

Any comments from people with experience of Jackaroos (post
1995 ish) and roof racks?

MH
Ive been holding back on buying 50kg roof rack ratings cos im looking at buying a rooftop tent aswell, ive been asking the same question and what ive been told is to buy 75kg racks and buy a roofrack cage designed to accomodate a rooftop tent, they are the ones with 1/3 side railes at the front and the 2/3 at the back which is flat,and that distributes the weight evenly so you can safely carry the tent and 2 adults without it collapsing.
Hope this helps.
 

underdog

Well-Known Member
Can I clarify a widely misunderstood belief here? Weight ratings for roof racks aren't referring to the maximum 'static' load limit, they're actually referring to the maximum load when the vehicle is in motion! If you think about it, most roof racks aren't designed to take more than 75kg according to recommendations from manufacturers(I think I've seen a select few now that are rated to 100kg). How many blokes do you know that are under 75kg?? Add that blokes partner to the equation and you have a laughable scenario for the manufacturers. I have roof rack bars (not an actual flat rack) rated to 75kg, and I have a 55kg rooftop tent. I've had two 70+kg adults up there many a time and never had any issues (mind you obviously there's a lot less weight in two crossbars than an entire rack). No roof rack manufacturer can warrant a maximum 'static' load for their racks because every car that they're mounted on has an entirely different system/rating for the maximum weight on it's roof.

Long story short:
load ratings for roof racks only apply to what will be carried on the rack whilst driving.
 
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ratsack

Member
load ratings for roof racks only apply to what will be carried on the rack whilst driving.
Ruling out roof campers, isn't that basically every roof rack? Who drives somewhere and then puts things on the roof rack once they're stopped only to take it off again once you drive again?

Not trying to be a smartass, I'm actually trying to find out as I plan on getting a roof rack in the next month with an awning. I also want to be able to put jerry's of water/fuel up there but heaps of other stuff...
 

underdog

Well-Known Member
Ruling out roof campers, isn't that basically every roof rack? Who drives somewhere and then puts things on the roof rack once they're stopped only to take it off again once you drive again?

Not trying to be a smartass, I'm actually trying to find out as I plan on getting a roof rack in the next month with an awning. I also want to be able to put jerry's of water/fuel up there but heaps of other stuff...
I'm clarifying on the basis that most people I talk to think their body-weight figures into the load rating allowance. ie. Roof rack rated to 50kg; 50kg tent + 2 adults = exceeding the limit. If you plan on carrying extra weight on the rack then the load rating IS relevant to you and you should confirm the total load limit for your car's roof (from the vehicle manufacturer), then you can factor in the weight of the rack + all carried items, etc. and work out what you'll need, preferably before you open your wallet.
 
I'm clarifying on the basis that most people I talk to think their body-weight figures into the load rating allowance. ie. Roof rack rated to 50kg; 50kg tent + 2 adults = exceeding the limit. If you plan on carrying extra weight on the rack then the load rating IS relevant to you and you should confirm the total load limit for your car's roof (from the vehicle manufacturer), then you can factor in the weight of the rack + all carried items, etc. and work out what you'll need, preferably before you open your wallet.
Obviously there must be a static load limit for the roof (a
point before which it begins to break) but for sound reasons
this is not published and I doubt a manufacturer would quote
it in writing.

I have it in mind that Australian Design Rules require a
passenger car's roof be able to support the weight of the
vehicle in the event of a roll-over (convertibles excepted I
imagine) - am I correct?

Also, due to shock loading, is making love in a roof top tent
permitted? Bet they won't put that in the manual :)

MH
 

underdog

Well-Known Member
Obviously there must be a static load limit for the roof (a
point before which it begins to break) but for sound reasons
this is not published and I doubt a manufacturer would quote
it in writing.

I have it in mind that Australian Design Rules require a
passenger car's roof be able to support the weight of the
vehicle in the event of a roll-over (convertibles excepted I
imagine) - am I correct?

Also, due to shock loading, is making love in a roof top tent
permitted? Bet they won't put that in the manual :)

MH
I know of a few people outside the forum that were quoted a maximum load rating for their vehicle's roof from the manufacturer, but you are correct about it not being in writing. As for roll overs, I'd believe that, however I've personally seen a large bloke jump on the rear pillar of a small car and buckle it..

Haha, all I'll say to that last comment, Mike.. is my tent ain't broke yet ;)
 

Patrick Albrecht

Active Member
Note a 96 pajero with the gutter system is rated at 100kg

I had a 75kg (+) steel rack + Roof top tent and bedding, awning, with gas bottles and jerry cans, then my self partner and mans best friend.

High lift jack and shovel on other side

never a problem, you just had to watch the centre of gravity when 4wding.

A tip, get a bigger wind shield than I had same height of the camper!
 

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Skylo

New Member
I always take that maximum weight per anchor point. Meaning 200kg, 4 anchor points so 50 kgs per point.
 
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