Ideal tyre pressures

Jono3095

New Member
Hey guys, super noob question - I have a 2022 Triton GLS manual with 265/65/18 Fallen Wildpeak ATs on them. I was wondering what the ideal tyre pressure is for normal road driving. I can’t remember what the bloke said when I got them put on last year but I feel like it might’ve been 38-40psi - does this sound right? Other than that car is stock and I don’t carry much weight in the back. Thanks guys!
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
38 to 40psi sounds like a lot to me.

Unladen I usually run 30 psi in the front (with steel bar & winch) & 32 psi in the back, as the weight increases the pressures go up.

 
This is one of those questions that don't really have a one-size-fits-all answer. A lot will depend on the weight you carry.

I run my 33 inch km3's at 45psi on a lifted 80 series. They're 33x12.5 on 15 inch rims so have plenty of sidewall. The tyre has it's maximum load capacity at 45psi according to the numbers on the sidewall so that's what I run it at. Seems to work well for me.

My fourby is heavy all the time though. I take out my clothes, chainsaw, cooktop etc at the end of a trip, but I leave all my drawers packed with a jerry of water on the rear bar and rtt permanently affixed. Loading up for a trip I probably only add about 100kg of gear or so.

If you're the type to strip all your camping gear out at the end of a trip your day to day tyre pressures will prob need to be reduced.
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
Hey guys, super noob question - I have a 2022 Triton GLS manual with 265/65/18 Fallen Wildpeak ATs on them. I was wondering what the ideal tyre pressure is for normal road driving. I can’t remember what the bloke said when I got them put on last year but I feel like it might’ve been 38-40psi - does this sound right? Other than that car is stock and I don’t carry much weight in the back. Thanks guys!
Are they p metric or LT construction? Pointless answering until the correct information is found.
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
If you know your axle weights then I find you can calculate a starting pressure. Check the side wall for the Max pressure and load, example 80psi Max pressure/1450kg Max load= 0.05psi per kg. Let's say you have 1000kg on the axle then that's 500kg per tyre, 0.05x500 = 27.6psi. For me that gives a good starting point to fine tune from
 

Mick_Marsh

Active Member
It also depends on your driving style.

I used to run the tyres on the Commodore at 35psi. When getting an alignment, the tyre tech showed me how the edges were wearing but the centre wasn't. He recommended 45. At the next wheel alignment, he showed me how the centre of the tread was wearing faster and advised to drop it back to 40.
Keep an eye on your tyre wear. That is the best indication for what pressure to run your tyres at.
 

2luxes

Well-Known Member
When you decide on a pressure, you could try "branding" the tyres to see if they are wearing evenly.

Heat a small flat head nail to red hot and touch each tyre lightly about six or seven times in a straight line across the tread.

Check them regularly and you will soon see if anything is wrong with pressure or wheel alignment before it has gone too far.
 

Ron0z

Active Member
Love it. Never heard of this idea, but I have no doubt it would show even/uneven wear. You'd need to be very careful to get the depth the same on each indentation. Perhaps making up some sort of depth gauge would do their trick. Something like you have on your electric drill to stop the drill bit from biting too deep.
 

Wayneo68

Member
Wow. So many responses and some so technical. I've got 2021 Triton with steelies 245/70 by 16 inch. Stock from the factory they all had 30psi. On the black top I run 32-34psi front and 34-36psi rear. They A/T stockies Bridges and only done 5.5k KMs but I like em. Quiet on bitumen and capable off-road, so far. Lol.....
 

2luxes

Well-Known Member
I have always thought the car manufacturer knows more about tyre pressures than I do so ever since I started driving in late 1963, I have used their pressure's and I have never had any problems with them.

When I bought my 2003 Hilux in 2007, I thought the hand book pressures looked too low at 25 psi front at all times and 25 to 34 rear depending on load.

I put a set of standard size 205x16 Goodyear Wrangler TG tyres on it then rang Goodyear's customer information number. I was told to use Toyota's pressures, never let them down on unsealed roads and tracks and if I wanted to go any higher then don't go up any more than 4psi.

I now have stock size AT tyres on it and are still using the handbook pressures. Both the Wranglers and the ATs have been on countless mountain and desert tracks without and problems and only 1 puncture which was so small that it had to be submerged in water to find it.

I would recommend anyone fitting new tyres to contact the tyre manufacturer. Details should be on their web site but make sure you know the weight at each end first.

Weight and pressures are two of about a dozen things that play a major role in determining whether a car is going to understeer or oversteer.
 

Wayneo68

Member
Agree there 2luxes about factory recommendations. Good place to start. Vary from there with load, type of road conditions etc.......
 

Toyasaurus

Well-Known Member
I was told by the tyre fitters that mine should be run at 40psi.
The last set of coopers were wearing badly due to under inflation.
These are Kumho highway tyres, I have another set of rims with my off roads on them.
Weight is about 750-800 each corner, 100 series V8, not constant 4wd.
I`ve put about 11k on them so far, just done the first rotation and alignment, all good
 

Lost1?

Well-Known Member
Start at 34 PSI and work your way up from there. Use the chalk method to work out if you are over or under inflated. I run a bigger.LT rated tyre on my Triton and only need 32 PSI when empty and 34 PSI at GVM.

When running stock size P rated tyres 34 PSI unloaded and 38 PSI loaded worked. While you have a later model vehicle, stock weights are similar.
 
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