How would you deal with the water problem?

Tyamne

New Member
Whenever we go camping, one thing I'm never satisfied with is water. I'm very sensitive to its taste and smell if it's not of OK quality, and I'm fed up of having tummy problems when we have a relaxing weekend camping just because the water had who knows what in it. But this is camping, it's not like I can carry a filter with me. What would you do if you were in my shoes?
 

Kippie

Well-Known Member
For travelling I store water in a 60 litre PVC bladder. When I first got the bladder a few years ago I filled it with a mix of fresh water and lemon juice. Left it to soak a couple of days to remove the plastic taste. The water we use is filtered rain water, so no chemical additives.
 

hiluxdriver

Well-Known Member
You'll get used to it. I had the squirts for 2 weeks while my gut got used to drinking bore water, then everything went back to normal. If the taste puts you off put a bit of cordial in it.
 

McGinnis

Member
But this is camping, it's not like I can carry a filter with me.
Why not? You have a multitude of options. If you have a tank and pump in the vehicle, install an inline carbon filter. I carry a filter even when hiking, it's certainly possible with a vehicle.
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
I have a filter on my main kitchen tap at home so I take bottled filtered water.

I also carry a couple of water jerry cans depending on the length of the trip which is just town tap water for everything else, including washing up, showering & making cups of tea.

If I was going for long periods I would definitely carry a filter to be able to fill the jerry cans from flowing creeks or lakes.
I even fill the jerry cans up at petrol stations when stopping for fuel, but its polite to ask 1st

But I would not drink straight creek water as there are to many parasites in it, nor even shower in it for that matter.

The thing about creek water is you don't know if there is a dead animal carcass in it just upstream, or wild brumbies/cattle have been defecating in it!!

I also have a small filter in my survival pack as well, you never know when you might need it & it might just save your life one day!

 
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Outrage

4x4 Earth Contributer
I use a plastic 20L container (intended for drinking water). Make sure it is washed before use, then fill it up directly from the tap. Don't use a hose as that will stuff the taste (unless you have a special food grade hose).

Family had issues with their caravan tank water, always plastic tasting. It ended up as washing water only and carried a few 20L containers for drinking water. Longer base camp trips we had a water boiler that would stay on the camp fire and river water would be put in that (if we did end up drinking that it was at least boiled for considerable time before consumption).
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
I always keep a slab of 600ml waters in the ute when camping. It goes against all my beliefs, but the kids actually grab them and drink them, and I'll be honest, so do I. You don't get through a heap of actual drinking water on a camp and if it makes life easier for me then call me a sucker. I've found every new tank ive had has a taint when new that slowly goes away over a few trips.
 

Bomber2012

Well-Known Member
For shorter trips 2-5 days I take a 24 pack of bottled water for drinking and a 20l container I bought from Kmart for cooking /cleaning .

The 20 litre Kmart container is a great price and works well , I know it won't last for ages but it has done the job for the past 12 months.
 

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Albynsw

Well-Known Member
I always keep a slab of 600ml waters in the ute when camping. It goes against all my beliefs, but the kids actually grab them and drink them, and I'll be honest, so do I. You don't get through a heap of actual drinking water on a camp and if it makes life easier for me then call me a sucker. I've found every new tank ive had has a taint when new that slowly goes away over a few trips.
One big advantage I find of bottled water is that you create space as you use it as opposed to carrying an empty water container. Plus you can stow them in all the little empty spaces in your vehicle
 

SteveGF

New Member
First off, I disagree with bottled water for hydration cause you have no guarantee that it's pure, to begin with, there have been a lot of scandals over the years surrounding its purity. And secondly, you actually end up doing more harm than good cause you increase carbon footprint and add to the already alarming plastic pollution issue. If you can't, don't, or won't install a filter, you can opt for a filtration pitcher. They're much cheaper, easier to use, clean the water just fine, and are more of an on the go solution to your problem. Another method is to boil the water and get rid of the sediment that is left at the bottom of the recipient, let it cool, and drink it. There are quite a few solutions even for campers, so you shouldn't have a hard time with this problem.
https://www.dummies.com/sports/camping/purifying-the-water-while-camping/
https://www.optimainstitute.com/water/alkaline-water-pitcher.html
https://www.ets.org/s/research/pdf/reading4_bottled_water.pdf
 

Hoyks

Well-Known Member
I take 60L of tap water from home in jerries. Get the good ones though, you don't want something that tastes of plastic. 20L-40L of that is reserved strictly for drinking, the last 20 is for washing and cooking.

Where possible I try and use the creek or local water for the washing and cooking bit. Unless the creek is a horrible mud pit, then I try and fill it up when I can.

As SteveGF said, most bottled water is just expensive tap water or filtered bore water, dispite the nice pictures on the bottles. I do on occasion buy a small slab of it, but mainly so I have bottles I can fill from the jerries and cycle through the Engel.
 

CTL

Well-Known Member
One big advantage I find of bottled water is that you create space as you use it as opposed to carrying an empty water container. Plus you can stow them in all the little empty spaces in your vehicle
And if you buy the cheap Woolies bottles they crush down to nothing or burn really quickly
 

Petunia

Well-Known Member
Burn? Containers for change, every 10 is worth a buck, you'd bend down to pick up less than a buck? :cool:

THE Answer = Beer
 

McGinnis

Member
I just fill containers (AS4020 certified) with tap water from home and take enough for a trip. If I had a tank in the fourby I'd make sure to use an inline carbon filter on the inlet to ensure what goes in to the tank is clean, and dose it with appropriate amounts of sodium hypochlorite (not swimming pool stuff with isocyanate in it). You'd only need to carry a miniscule amount to keep a tank dosed to ~1mg/L.
 

CTL

Well-Known Member
Burn? Containers for change, every 10 is worth a buck, you'd bend down to pick up less than a buck? :cool:
If I was looking to make money from empties, I’d tow a trailer each camping trip and fill it with the empties left behind by the mouth breathing boggins :eek:
 

billolga

Well-Known Member
First off, I disagree with bottled water for hydration cause you have no guarantee that it's pure, to begin with, there have been a lot of scandals over the years surrounding its purity. And secondly, you actually end up doing more harm than good cause you increase carbon footprint and add to the already alarming plastic pollution issue. If you can't, don't, or won't install a filter, you can opt for a filtration pitcher. They're much cheaper, easier to use, clean the water just fine, and are more of an on the go solution to your problem. Another method is to boil the water and get rid of the sediment that is left at the bottom of the recipient, let it cool, and drink it. There are quite a few solutions even for campers, so you shouldn't have a hard time with this problem.
https://www.dummies.com/sports/camping/purifying-the-water-while-camping/
https://www.optimainstitute.com/water/alkaline-water-pitcher.html
https://www.ets.org/s/research/pdf/reading4_bottled_water.pdf
Bottled water It's only - 1,000 times more expensive than tap water & where did it come from & has it been tested.
I carry 2x 10 ltr containers for a few days plus a 60 lt water bag that goes behind the front seats for longer trips & never have a problem with water anywhere.
BTW I think some will have to buy a new keyboard as the Question Mark has quit!!! :oops:










/
 
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stevemc181

Well-Known Member
75 litre stainless tank with a B.E.S.T water filter. No taste problems and the filter gets rid of most of the crud. I’ll usually fill from town sources where possible, but occasionally fill from wells/waterholes etc if needed.
Also usually have about 30 litres of beer onboard ;)
 
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