How to use 4WD gears & when to use them.

Check out the link below, I run through 4wd gears and explain when to use them. If you are new to 4 wheeling it can be a little confusing knowing when to use 4wd and whether to use high 4 or low 4. In this introductory episode to gears I hope to explain the basic principles of both manual and auto 4wd modes.
 
To be honest I only watched the first few minutes and not super impressed. Saying 2h is preferred for gravel roads is a bit iffy I think
Thanks for the tip mate, your spot on in regards to it being iffy in 2h on gravel roads so if the surface is something other than a stable surface definitely consider 4WD gears
 

Rhett HS

Well-Known Member
It would be a challenge to cover all of the different types of gearboxes and transfer cases out there on the market these days in a short video.
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
I always use 4wd, ah hang on it is constant 4wd in both my 4wds, I always lock the center diff as soon as I hit gravel in the D1 , heaps more stable, in the D4 I just let the computers sort it out and dont bother pressing any buttons unless it starts getting pretty extreme
 

CaptainBanana

Well-Known Member
My Prado has no 2H selection as it's AWD/4WD but there is an interesting view here on 2H/4H if you do have a centre diff.

https://practicalmotoring.com.au/car-advice/mitsubishis-super-select-4x4-system-explained/
That articles a bit misleading also. His statements about wheel spin and traction control intervention are less relevant on modern vehicles where traction systems are less intrusive in 2wd mode anyway. With that said I often drove the triton in 4h because it was rubbish at towing with any significant ball weight.
 
Interesting, something seemed a bit odd with it, after all most cars are similar 2wd affairs and even on a Mitsubishi car with traction control I've never experienced this effect even after giving it a bootful at times and traction control activating once or twice.
 

CaptainBanana

Well-Known Member
Interesting, something seemed a bit odd with it, after all most cars are similar 2wd affairs and even on a Mitsubishi car with traction control I've never experienced this effect even after giving it a bootful at times and traction control activating once or twice.
With a greasy road, open diff centre, hard right lock and plenty of throttle the earlier traction control systems abruptly cut power.

My vx clubsport (and all v8 model Holden's back then) went as far as physically pushing the gas pedal back once traction intervened. It's a very different ball game with modern abs/traction units.
 

Rhett HS

Well-Known Member
A vehicle with three open diffs, theoretically, when cornering all of the power can go out of the front inside tyre.

Or during any other circumstances, any front or rear tyre. Such as any front tyre when driving up a boat ramp.
 

sharkcaver

Well-Known Member
With a greasy road, open diff centre, hard right lock and plenty of throttle the earlier traction control systems abruptly cut power.
That's stability control in action, not traction control. Activated by a yaw sensor, it will, if deemed appropriate both cut power and bring traction control into play to brake a particular wheel (or wheels) to bring the vehicle back on the straight and narrow. It's very effective on road. It's a pain in sand and soft stuff, but there is a magic button to disable it. Go to low range in the SS4 and it's disabled anyhow.
 

CaptainBanana

Well-Known Member
That's stability control in action, not traction control. Activated by a yaw sensor, it will, if deemed appropriate both cut power and bring traction control into play to brake a particular wheel (or wheels) to bring the vehicle back on the straight and narrow. It's very effective on road. It's a pain in sand and soft stuff, but there is a magic button to disable it. Go to low range in the SS4 and it's disabled anyhow.

Not true as cars prior to stability control were acting the same way, this is absolutely true of pre VE Commodores for example.

To expand a little - earlier traction control systems were on a basic level just measuring the difference between left and right wheel speed and pulling throttle or spark back based on that.
 

CaptainBanana

Well-Known Member
Not exactly as they were basically useless during evasive maneuvers or oversteering at speed.... they cut power when a wheel that was spinning faster than it's opposing wheel and that is all. This means if driving when no power was being applied they did nothing at all so evasive maneuvers with throttle lifted it did nothing..... swerving for wildlife for example.
 
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My vx clubsport (and all v8 model Holden's back then) went as far as physically pushing the gas pedal back once traction intervened. It's a very different ball game with modern abs/traction units.
That's pretty nuts it did that with the pedal! I've only ever noticed the car just make pulsing noises with traction control, of course simulating a locked diff by braking the slipping wheel.
 

CaptainBanana

Well-Known Member
From memory it would kick the pedal first then cut fuel and then cut spark depending on how determined you were to step it out. Of course it had no yaw sensing or any other control features so if you were to swing the wheel like a peanut at speed you would just be wrapped around a tree which is what still happens to this day.
 

sharkcaver

Well-Known Member
Not true as cars prior to stability control were acting the same way, this is absolutely true of pre VE Commodores for example.
You mentioned the Triton. I was giving the info re 2002 onwards mitsubishi's with stab control and traction control. I haven't owned a dunny door since I bought a VS in 1997, so I have no idea what they do now, nor any other make/brand. My dunny door back then had a cable throttle, therefore no capacity for stab control. I could plant it as much as I likes and it would just keep going.

As far as I know, any vehicle with stab control has an electronic pedal. Maybe there are mechanical ones, I have no idea.

In the Mits, what you describe is stab control. I cant answer for anything else.
 
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