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how to stop rust while working

Discussion in 'D.I.Y' started by Deccas, Jan 7, 2018.

  1. Deccas

    Deccas Active Member

    gday all im just wondering how to stop metal rusting before you paint it? i plan on stripping my ute tray back to metal, fixing it up a bit then repainting and cant find any ways to stop the steel from rusting.
    cheer
     
  2. discomatt

    discomatt Well-Known Member

    Paint it with etch primer if sitting for a while
     
    komaterpillar likes this.
  3. BIGCOL

    BIGCOL Well-Known Member

    Google Xtroll Rust Conqueror, its the ants pants!
    Will do the job no worries.
    Col.
     
  4. melveee

    melveee Member

  5. cam04

    cam04 Well-Known Member

    We use penetrol as a primer.
     
  6. PhillT

    PhillT New Member

    Tray backs are usually a well used item, so are going to get chipped & scratched all the time.
    The best solution is an Ali tray, however, if you are sticking to steel, and you intend to use the tray, it will get paint damage along the way, so the easiest solution I found was to paint it with something that looks OK and can be touched up easily and quickly.
    For me that was Kill Rust (Wattyl) which is available in quite a few colours, paint-on and spray cans.
    If you touch up over a little surface rust, it seems to neutralise is and last well. I prefer the brush-on because I recon it adheres better. It doesn't leave brush marks if you pick you weather (not too hot) and apply it carefully.

    Now in answer to your question, look at what the sand blasters do,....they blast then prime immediately, because the process of oxidation begins immediately.
    Get all your repairs done first, then if you are wire brushing it, do a section at a time and prime it the same day (within an hour or two if it is wet or humid) with a really good metal primer.
    My choice these days is White Knight Cold Galv. a bit dearer perhaps, but brilliant for stopping rust, and a good flat finish for the topcoat to go onto.
    All the above is assuming you are going for oil based top coat.
    If you want 2-pack or automotive paint, then the same process will give you good results, but the product will be very different. Etch primer then top coat, and the best of luck with the inevitable ongoing touch-ups ;-)
     

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