How much weight on the roof for a 2001 Mitsubishi Challenger?

Jamesjamesjames

New Member
Hey guys and girls

How much weight can I put on the roof of a 2001 Mitsubishi Challenger?

I have cross bars which I will adjust to support a full roof rack from Kings. This kings roof rack weighs 50kg I think and can support 500kg but the cross bars can only support 75kg...

I have been told exceeding this max weight isn't a 'big' issue - you just have to keep the nuts and bolts tight, especially after driving on corrugations etc.

On this roof rack I will have 2-4 water cans, 3 jerry cans, a tool box full of tools and a second spare tire.

I am aware that all the weight will be on the cross bar clamps. Everything will be on these pressure points and I really dont want them to fail.

Any advice would be appreciated. If the cross bars cant support all the weight I am putting on it maybe I will have to look into getting another car, it's as simple as that unfortunately. Cheers
 

smitty_r51

Well-Known Member
You won't be putting that weight on any reasonably modern car (last 15 years with the possible exception of the new defender which is rated to 130kg on road) without risking wrecking the car, not to mention raising the centre of gravity risking roll-over.

Ditch the heavy platform for an alloy one and then reconsider what you put on it.
 

sharkcaver

Well-Known Member
Without even going into the roof capacity of the challenger and whether or not you are planning on putting this onto factory rails with crossbars or an aftermarket crossbar fitment.....

3x 20l jerrys = 60Kg
one spare = 35Kg's

That is beyond your limit right there without even taking into account all the other stuff you plan to carry up there. Then you need to derate for off road usage.

As to finding another car that can carry greater, good luck with that.

I think you need to replan your packing requirements. Corro's wont loosen your nuts, it will make either the roof mounts or the rails fail.
 

Colly18

Well-Known Member
Hi James, the old days of touring with a 50 kg+ roof rack with full length gutter mounts on a Landcruiser or Patrol with another hundred kg + of gear up top are long gone. Whilst I think a Challenger is a pretty capable 4WD they do lack storage space, so the challenge :) becomes one of how to minimise weight and volume of your load. I have a friend with a Mitsubishi Challenger who does mention that it can be heavy on fuel/petrol. Looking at your proposed route I see the section "that sandy track" along the coast on the Nullarbor as an issue, where fuel consumption could be very high, depending on what sections you do. If I were you, I'd be considering what condition is my Challenger in and how much do I want to spend on mods for the trip?, verses trading up to a diesel dual cab ute. Or alternatively, can I leave the convoy for some sections where I may run out of fuel? Mods for the Challenger to investigate could be a larger fuel tank or second fuel tank, or swing away rear spare wheel and jerrry can holder(?). But is it worth spending big $ on an old Challenger? Carrying petrol inside the vehicle is a risky (potentially dangerous) thing and I don't see how you can safely carry what you propose on a roof rack.
 

Batts88

Well-Known Member
You need a 40ser cruiser they can handle the weight they have real steel pillars mine had a full length gutter mount roof rack it alone was heavy as hell I usually carried surf boards and surf skies on it and sometime have 2 people standing on it checking out the surf good for collecting heaps of timber for a camp fire I even had 5 timber railway sleepers on it once that made it a bit to top heavy but didn't break anything.
Lots of people even made roof racks that were mounted to the chassis that would be strong but heavy.
 
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Jamesjamesjames

New Member
Thanks for your replies everyone.

What do you propose I do?

I feel like I need the jerry cans, water cans, 2nd spare and tool box as we will be spending alot of time offroading. Where else could I store all this equipment if, like you say, the roof cant support all that weight?

Is buying another car a better alternative? Or wont any car be capable of the weight load I plan to mount on the roof? I really appreciate your replies
 

Batts88

Well-Known Member
Fit a long range fuel tank I see they're around 40Lts bigger than the factory 74Ltr tank that will help one issue.
 
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shanegtr

Well-Known Member
You won't be putting that weight on any reasonably modern car (last 15 years with the possible exception of the new defender which is rated to 130kg on road) without risking wrecking the car, not to mention raising the centre of gravity risking roll-over.
200 series factory roof load rating is 200kgs. Be a fun ride with that sort of weight up there I'd imagine. Most vehicles would be sub 100kg roof load rated I think you'll find
 

mikehzz

Well-Known Member
If the crossbars can carry 75kgs and the platform weighs 50kgs, then you can only carry 25kgs up there because the weight has to include the platform if the bars are carrying it.
 

Colly18

Well-Known Member
Thanks for your replies everyone.

What do you propose I do?

I feel like I need the jerry cans, water cans, 2nd spare and tool box as we will be spending alot of time offroading. Where else could I store all this equipment if, like you say, the roof cant support all that weight?

Is buying another car a better alternative? Or wont any car be capable of the weight load I plan to mount on the roof? I really appreciate your replies

That's why I suggested a dual cab diesel ute as an option. They are hard to beat for long distance touring i.m.o. With a one tonne carrying capacity you can carry extra fuel and water in the tub + you can still have one spare on the roof rack. Rip the rear seat out for extra luggage room and reinstall it after the trip. Diesel will get heaps better economy, especially with a load. Issue is s/h they are expensive at the moment.
 

Lost1?

Well-Known Member
For the trip you are planning one spare should suffice if you have LT rated AT tyres. Fuel and water are the problem. Scout around for a second hand LR tank. Add one Jerry and you have +120L of fuel. Again, more than you need. If you buy 10L containers for water that would make it easier to stack into your load. 3 should do.
 

Colly18

Well-Known Member
For the trip you are planning one spare should suffice if you have LT rated AT tyres. Fuel and water are the problem. Scout around for a second hand LR tank. Add one Jerry and you have +120L of fuel. Again, more than you need. If you buy 10L containers for water that would make it easier to stack into your load. 3 should do.
Carry one spare!? Maybe so, since James is travelling in convoy and if there are other compatable wheel swaps within the group. Otherwise, i.mo., it's a gamble, given it is so easy to spike sidewalls off-road. If sticking with the Challenger consider a cargo barrier behind the rear seat and store tools, fridge, water etc behind that. I'd rip the rear seat out to provide extra luggage room. As others suggest, light bulky stuff on the roof rack/rails, or maybe just one spare wheel on rated roof rails/bars (that would save you buying a roof rack). Some cheap solution to an increased fuel tank capacity seems the main hurdle. Given you(James) are travelling in convoy, look at reducing your load (recovery gear, tools) if others have them and can provide assistance if required. I'm sure it's doable! :) You'll need decent suspension with a heavy load and be prepared to travel slower on highways if you have a loaded roof rack, as the petrol Challenger will suck plenty of juice at highway speeds.
 

Lost1?

Well-Known Member
Carry one spare!? Maybe so, since James is travelling in convoy and if there are other compatable wheel swaps within the group. Otherwise, i.mo., it's a gamble, given it is so easy to spike sidewalls off-road.

I have 2 spares for my ute. If I was going deep into the Kimberly, Canning Stock route, pushing through to the coast in the gulf country or Arnhem land I will take a second spare. But not on Savannah way and other dirt roads crossing to Perth. I only took one spare for a solo crossing of the Simpson. If James is running LT rated tyres I think it is low risk. Tyres are far better than they used to be. Manage tyre pressures properly, stick to the track and there should be no issue.
 

Colly18

Well-Known Member
Gets down to what risks you want to take. Despite having near new A/T tyres on these occasions I've had a metal peg through a tyre on a well used Pilbara Road, just the right shaped rock through a new tyre on the Oodnadatta Track, the smallest (but sharpest) of a stump stake a sidewall when just pulling off a desert track for lunch. I know I just hate that feeling in my gut travelling with no spare after changing a flat. It goes without saying to carry a puncture repair kit, but not all punctures can be fixed by plugs.
 

mikehzz

Well-Known Member
Gets down to what risks you want to take. Despite having near new A/T tyres on these occasions I've had a metal peg through a tyre on a well used Pilbara Road, just the right shaped rock through a new tyre on the Oodnadatta Track, the smallest (but sharpest) of a stump stake a sidewall when just pulling off a desert track for lunch. I know I just hate that feeling in my gut travelling with no spare after changing a flat. It goes without saying to carry a puncture repair kit, but not all punctures can be fixed by plugs.
I've had all the same. Staking the sidewall of a new tyre....:eek:
 

Bomber2012

Well-Known Member
Hey guys and girls

How much weight can I put on the roof of a 2001 Mitsubishi Challenger?

I have cross bars which I will adjust to support a full roof rack from Kings. This kings roof rack weighs 50kg I think and can support 500kg but the cross bars can only support 75kg...

I have been told exceeding this max weight isn't a 'big' issue - you just have to keep the nuts and bolts tight, especially after driving on corrugations etc.

On this roof rack I will have 2-4 water cans, 3 jerry cans, a tool box full of tools and a second spare tire.

I am aware that all the weight will be on the cross bar clamps. Everything will be on these pressure points and I really dont want them to fail.

Any advice would be appreciated. If the cross bars cant support all the weight I am putting on it maybe I will have to look into getting another car, it's as simple as that unfortunately. Cheers
Rethink what you need to carry , you are over your limit .
If you really need to carry all that stuff a trailer is your best option.
Your buying the cheapest rack you can find and expecting it to carry well over its limit???
Im no expert but a Kings rack loaded over its limit driving corrigations is going to end in tears.
 

billolga

4x4 Earth Contributer
Good luck with 500 kgs on the Roof.
You do realize that each Jerry Can weighs 20kg including the Can.

I have seen many Roof Racks (Plus busted Trailers) along the side of the tracks over the years & it costs HEAPS in the Thousands of $ to be rescued outback.
 

Colly18

Well-Known Member
What's the verdict James? Which way do you think you'll go? I hope us older seasoned folk haven't scared you too much :)
 
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