Holden Colorado 2009

colorado4341

New Member
Holden Colorado, 2009


Good Points
Good low range with the deisel. Long wheel base that gives good traction but limits ramp over angle.

Bad Points
The front leaf spring hanger is approx 75mm below the chasis rail so gets bashed on step ups

What mods have you done?
GME UHF radio
Garmin GPS
Custon roof basket
Roo Systems side awning
TJM winch bar
Ironman 9500lb Monster winch
Costom sliders
Factory snorkel
Factory 3000kg tow bar (recovery hitch)
4WD Systems LOKKA in the front (auto locker)

What mods are on the list to do?
+60mm lift all round
255 x 75 x 16 muddies

Why did you buy this vehicle?
Its a duel cab and everybody needs a ute.
I can put the bikes in the back and get away for the weekend

How often do you go offroad?
I try to get away at least once a month

What will your next vehicle be?
Probably an old Suzuki or Daihatsu that I will do up with my son and daughter - they have the bug
 

muc the truck

Well-Known Member
60 mm lift on front is not achievable without sacrificing ever single bit of downward travel. that sort of lift on the back is going to need caster wedges and having the rear end in the air is worse than having the rear saging . simply because its transferring wieght to the front wich is allready the heaviest and providing less traction to the rear.

better off keeping suspension down tarvel and fitting the tallest tyres (not nessasaryly the widest) you will provide your tyres with more traction this way as if you give up your down travel every time you run one wheel over a small ditch you will loose traction . remove a rear spring leaf in the back or two if you never carry much. this will allso make for more traction. rasing a car up often makes a more ridged ride and lessons the abuility for your suspension to contour with the changing track conditons . dont be peered into the tonka truck syndrome
 

colorado4341

New Member
Thanks Muc

Muc,

Thanks for your comments. I don't really want a tonka truck, I just want to lift the guts up a bit as I'm sick of dragging it over everything. I take onboard your comment about caster on the rear. The tyre size gives me the max diameter for QLD (well a bit over), without going to high in the profile. To obtain the same overall diameter for a given rim you must either increase width or profile.

I was under the impression that if you fitted modified torsion bars (say rock crawler bars) that are sold as specific 50mm lift then you would gain the height without sacrificing you downward travel. If this isn't the case why would you retrofit them instead of just cranking your standard?

Just my thoughts, I'm not an engineer, but won't the bigger re-set torsions provide more twist before reaching the maximum torque to bar can stand.
 

Swaggie

Moderator
I wouldn't think Insurance Companies would take too kindly to it either...Some pics would be good...

Welcome Aboard..
 

NIAL8R

New Member
i would be interested in seeing some pics of the colorado as i sold my 2.8TD HiLux with all the goodies and looking at a LT/R Colorado but havent yet seen one yet modded :D
 

muc the truck

Well-Known Member
Muc,

Thanks for your comments. I don't really want a tonka truck, I just want to lift the guts up a bit as I'm sick of dragging it over everything. I take onboard your comment about caster on the rear. The tyre size gives me the max diameter for QLD (well a bit over), without going to high in the profile. To obtain the same overall diameter for a given rim you must either increase width or profile.

I was under the impression that if you fitted modified torsion bars (say rock crawler bars) that are sold as specific 50mm lift then you would gain the height without sacrificing you downward travel. If this isn't the case why would you retrofit them instead of just cranking your standard?

Just my thoughts, I'm not an engineer, but won't the bigger re-set torsions provide more twist before reaching the maximum torque to bar can stand.

higher strenth torsion bars are simply stiffer and since they are stiffer it takes less turns on the adjusters to get them to factory ride hieght and due to there extra stiffness they dampen less under load and less likely to hit your bump stops . they do not create extra lift. the adjusters do the height adjustment . fitting heavy torsion bars then winding up the adjusters to were the old ones had the adjusters set will give you lift but this is not how your manufature recomend torsion bars be fitted at all.
the reason people should fit heavier springs or torsion bars is to carry more load . Remember adjusters do the lifting and with standard torsion bars in good conditon the adjusters are still capable of getting it wrong ,giving max lift and taking all down travel away and stressing the cv joints. 4x4 retailers sell a lot of torsion bars on false pretences. You dont need new torsion bars unless your overloading the ones you have be it too much wieght for stock or stock ones have faded. The adjusters are there to acomoadate torsion age and the adusters need adusting first as the very first part of a wheel alighnment , the reason why you pay more for a 4x4 wheel alignment than say a car.

after market torsion bars marketed for raised suspention have less tortional twist and more resistance to flex to the load you carry so you dont buy these to increase the flex of your suspension it does the opposite . it reduces it . wieght/spring rate causes flex and adding stiffer springs works against the wieght of your vehicle so in stiffer coils and leaves it lifts the weight higher but not in torsion bars because of the variable adjuster , the posision of the aduster changes hieght. you can have the stiffest torsion bars and still have it riding low on the bumpstops if the ajuster is not set corectly like old hoons in valiants used to to lower there car .

in saying all this unless run fully loaded there is no need to buy torsion bars until you have run out of ajustment .

any change from the factory adjuster setting up is a loss of travel in one direction as the range is governed by bump stops (upper and lower). increasing the hieght with heavier torsion bars will not give you more compression unless vehicle wieght can overcome the strenth of the torsion bar to do so and often leads to a firmer ride with less travel now in both directions . ok for beach driving to get the belly up but no good for the glasshouse mountain tracks were suspesion travel is required on un even ground to give traction on all 4 wheels just to get up the hill. You never see a pro 4x4 vehicle set up with stiffer springs , they allways set them up so the cars wieght can use all of the range of movement . travel is traction and traction is eveything a 4x4 needs. The second the springs are too stiff and overcome the vehicle wieght on a un even surface a wheel comes off the ground and traction is lost.

So regaurdless of what 4x4 you have spring rate afects how good your vehicle is off road . too many get it wrong by going to stiff. personaly i would rather a 4x4 that wallows around a roundabout and excells on trails. dont over estimate wieght when buying springs .
 
Last edited:

colorado4341

New Member
Tortion lift

Thanks Muc,

Your explanation makes sense.

So in the end, apart from bigger tyres, there is no effective way of lifting a tortion bar front end without the loss of articulation. BUGGER I didn't add the front locker just to drive a tyre touching nothing.
 
Top