Help me understand how Solar is cheaper at home.

Toyasaurus

Well-Known Member
Alby, during the bushfires we had 2x2 day blackouts.
The first was so smokey that my system was only generating about 1kw.
We had to be careful on our usage but never ran the batteries down below 28%.
I had to clean the panels every day to keep the solar charging, yes the smoke and ash was that bad.
We were one of the only ones who didn`t have to through out our fridge and freezer full of food.

I think if the batteries were full and there was a blackout we could manage for about 4 days if there was not enough light to charge them.
Maybe more if we really kept watch on our usage.
 

Laingy

Member
G'day Solarites
I'm not electrically minded and wouldn't know an ohm from a volt, but..........I live on a houseboat with my lovely wife at White Sands on the Murray River just downstream from Murray Bridge in SA. We built our boat about 12 years ago and launched it in 2012 so we've been in the water for 10 years. When I was doing the hard yards and buying stuff for the boat a bloke at Tailem Bend had some ex-Telstra (not Tesla) batteries for sale, and I thought that would be a great way to power my boat when not connected to the shore. They're 2 volt deep cell truck batteries, whatever that means! Since then I've purchased some 2nd hand solar panels, 8 off, from a mate who was upgrading, and have installed them on the front roof of the boat, and connected them via an inverter to the batteries. The result is I can run all my 240 volt appliances from the batteries 24/7, and we haven't run out of volts yet! The batteries, solar panels, inverter and connection charges came to $4.5k. I pay nothing for electricity at all now, and don't even know when there's a power failure in the area, as my stuff keeps on working!

I don't think you can beat that!

Stay safe.

Laingy
 

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I reckon they will do the usual now that so many have pannels, time to tax them.

One of the big coal power plants closing early should send Sydney into turmoil and like that industry rep suggested,
no more paying the people for feeding excess back into the system, they can pay us to divert it back.
 

linuxfan66

Active Member
This is a very sobering article. Energy prices are about to go through the roof and the future looks bleak for coal and gas fired power stations.

autoexpert has been banging on for years that electric cars and renewables are necessary energy security...no surprises here
 

LongRoad2Go

Well-Known Member
No surprises here = collusion and profiteering by resource providers is all it amounts to for Oz and others in the realm.

The electric car fad are for ignorant greenies - wonder how many of them realise the amount of resources, environmental/community destruction in Third World countries, and corruption goes into making them, and how real-world recycling works. I reckon green hydrogen is the future - just need to sort out the science.
 
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Toyasaurus

Well-Known Member
A lot of people told me I was wasting money, my system would never pay its self off.

I wonder what they`ll think when they catch rolling blackout`s.

I am very happy with it, what is happening now would is what I thought may happen years ago. (not smug)
 

Mick_Marsh

Active Member
A lot of people told me I was wasting money, my system would never pay its self off.

I wonder what they`ll think when they catch rolling blackout`s.

I am very happy with it, what is happening now would is what I thought may happen years ago. (not smug)
Do you have an isolated system with a battery backup?
If not, when they load shed, your power gets turned off as well.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
8.25kw of panels and 2 Tesla ll batteries.

I don`t have to worry about blackouts.

It`s produced 38mwh since 2019,
I reduced my carbon emissions by about 23 Tons of CO2 per year with my solar. I originally thought a reduction in my CO2 footprint would be a small benefit but that and the savings are now something that I value highly. My electricity bill is now zero or negative for 9 months a year.
 

RBJET

Well-Known Member
Been considering solar again recently but since most of my power consumption is during winter and when the sun goes down, I don't think it's worth it.
Do you guys with solar (no batteries) use most of your power during the day to make the most of it?
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
Been considering solar again recently but since most of my power consumption is during winter and when the sun goes down, I don't think it's worth it.
Do you guys with solar (no batteries) use most of your power during the day to make the most of it?
I insulated the heck out of my house and bought quite a large air conditioner. Now I heat the house during the day and it stores the heat overnight. I do top up the temp after the sun goes down and in the morning, especially when it is cold. But essentially my house is one big thermal battery.

A good thing is that it is coolest when the skys are clear. So it is more efficient. I have 18KW of solar, and on some grey days it is lucky to throw out 1kw! but on average I generate over 110KWH per day in summer and 45KWH per day in Winter

During summer I do the opposite and set the house to cool during the day which lasts overnight. Cooling is now basically free.
 

Kippie

Moderator
Been considering solar again recently but since most of my power consumption is during winter and when the sun goes down, I don't think it's worth it.
Do you guys with solar (no batteries) use most of your power during the day to make the most of it?
Your hot water heater is an energy store. If it's electric, then hooking up to PV panels will allow you to store solar power in your hot water. My 200 liter hot water tank is fitted with a 1.8kW heating coil (instead of the standard 3kW) and timer to operate between sunrise and sunset. It is hooked up to a 3kW array. The system runs entirely on solar all year round.
 

RBJET

Well-Known Member
I insulated the heck out of my house and bought quite a large air conditioner. Now I heat the house during the day and it stores the heat overnight. I do top up the temp after the sun goes down and in the morning, especially when it is cold. But essentially my house is one big thermal battery.

A good thing is that it is coolest when the skys are clear. So it is more efficient. I have 18KW of solar, and on some grey days it is lucky to throw out 1kw! but on average I generate over 110KWH per day in summer and 45KWH per day in Winter

During summer I do the opposite and set the house to cool during the day which lasts overnight. Cooling is now basically free.
Cooling isn't an issue for me living at elevation in Victoria and having cathedral ceilings.
Heating is an issue living in a colder climate and not being able to add insulation without pulling roof sheets off. Even then there is only a few inches to insulate.
Keeping my daughters room warm during winter is the issue. The fire takes the chill off but it can still be very cold by early morning so we have an electric panel heater running overnight.
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
Your hot water heater is an energy store. If it's electric, then hooking up to PV panels will allow you to store solar power in your hot water. My 200 liter hot water tank is fitted with a 1.8kW heating coil (instead of the standard 3kW) and timer to operate between sunrise and sunset. It is hooked up to a 3kW array. The system runs entirely on solar all year round.
Does it revert to grid power when there is continued wet weather over several days?
 
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RBJET

Well-Known Member
Your hot water heater is an energy store. If it's electric, then hooking up to PV panels will allow you to store solar power in your hot water. My 200 liter hot water tank is fitted with a 1.8kW heating coil (instead of the standard 3kW) and timer to operate between sunrise and sunset. It is hooked up to a 3kW array. The system runs entirely on solar all year round.
My hot water is gas unfortunately.
 

Rusty Panels

Well-Known Member
We only have bottle gas available in our area. Our hot water is a small instantaneous unit and there are 2 control units, one in the kitchen the other in the ensuite. You can dial up any temperature between 40-60 and so far it has been great. The stove top is also LPG and between the pair we go through about $400 per year in gas. I reckon that's pretty cheap compared to electric.
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
We only have bottle gas available in our area. Our hot water is a small instantaneous unit and there are 2 control units, one in the kitchen the other in the ensuite. You can dial up any temperature between 40-60 and so far it has been great. The stove top is also LPG and between the pair we go through about $400 per year in gas. I reckon that's pretty cheap compared to electric.

We have the same setup and go through a bottle every 6 weeks @ $105 a bottle
 
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