Great Central Road

Bruiser2

New Member
Retired beekeeper here in SA, son is a beekeeper in WA. They move their bees to honey flows all over the state, your organic honey is higher risk of carrying disease than heat treated honey, which is the only way honey is permitted into WA from the east. If your empty honey container ends up in rubbish and is broken or left open bees will rob it and potentially take disease back to the hive. I've seen honey bees at, I think, Durba Springs on the CSR. Only way they could get out there IMO is if someone was out there on a honey flow. My son has been out east of Norseman in the last 2 years so the beekeepers do move around and honey from the eastern states is a HUGE RISK to their industry as we have diseases that they don't.
 

CTL

Well-Known Member
Retired beekeeper here in SA, son is a beekeeper in WA. They move their bees to honey flows all over the state, your organic honey is higher risk of carrying disease than heat treated honey, which is the only way honey is permitted into WA from the east. If your empty honey container ends up in rubbish and is broken or left open bees will rob it and potentially take disease back to the hive. I've seen honey bees at, I think, Durba Springs on the CSR. Only way they could get out there IMO is if someone was out there on a honey flow. My son has been out east of Norseman in the last 2 years so the beekeepers do move around and honey from the eastern states is a HUGE RISK to their industry as we have diseases that they don't.
Got stung by bees at Diebil Springs, massive hives. Plus saw more hives near the “Squatting Man”at Durba Spring.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
Honey from Native bees is delicious. It's hard to get but a very different taste. It has a different kind of sugar and is Low GI.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
Retired beekeeper here in SA, son is a beekeeper in WA. They move their bees to honey flows all over the state, your organic honey is higher risk of carrying disease than heat treated honey, which is the only way honey is permitted into WA from the east. If your empty honey container ends up in rubbish and is broken or left open bees will rob it and potentially take disease back to the hive. I've seen honey bees at, I think, Durba Springs on the CSR. Only way they could get out there IMO is if someone was out there on a honey flow. My son has been out east of Norseman in the last 2 years so the beekeepers do move around and honey from the eastern states is a HUGE RISK to their industry as we have diseases that they don't.
Is it true that bee keepers get to charge farmers Bruiser? You make money by squatting and then selling the produce. Nice little earner.
 

Bruiser2

New Member
Ha Ha depends, We usually give landholders honey, as much as they want, to go on their properties that have natural resources. eg native scrub
Almond growers for instance pay for pollination, sounds good but their is a lot of work to get the bees up at the end of July early Aug, which is the start of the new season. I was talking to the beekeeper that puts bees on our place (no I don't charge him) and he is seriously thinking of giving pollination away as it's too much work for the money. we are now at the stage were there aren't enough bees in Aus. to pollinate all the almonds they now have. At the end of the day it's primary production and beekeepers are at the mercy of the same gods as farmers. they would have lost huge amount of resources in the eastern states with all the bushfires (hate them being called wildfires) and will take at least 10 years to recover. Some farmers strike a deal to allow bees on their property provided you come back to pollinate their Canola,peas & beans. many commercial fruit trees need pollinating as well. In the US their beekeepers are mainly pollinaters now. Love to run in to you in the bush somewhere and we could have a good old yarn around the fire with a sherbet or 2
 
One of my best mates has a small property (10 acres or so) in the Noosa hinterland. He lets a local bee keeper run 4 or 5 native bee hives on his property in return for a few kgs of honey on the regular. He doesn't do it for any sort of return financially or otherwise, merely as a way to help native bees which in turn pollinate native vegetation around his property. The honey is welcome, but incidental.
 

Bruiser2

New Member
Good on him. The vast majority of native bees are in the north of the country and some you just can’t keep the are almost solitary. We only have a handful or so of varieties where we live.
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
I travelled the GCR about 6 or 7 years ago from Warburton on your way to Uluru ( we did the non abandoned section of the Gunbarrel). Anyway the GCR was as smooth as a decent bitumen road - until the NT border where it nearly instantly turned into a corrugated horrible piece of road
 

cookie64

4x4 Earth Contributer
@discomatt , we stopped at Warburton after doing the Talawana, Gary Highway, Gun Barrel and finally Heather Highway, booked into the Caravan Park / Roadhouse and spent the day refueling, showering and relaxing ... watched some coppers come in and escort someone away from a cabin, followed by a revisit to collect a second person from the same cabin.

We then had the Grader drivers enter the council compound later in the afternoon and warn us of locals entering the campground, smashing car windows and taking whatever they could grab quickly which made for a longish night.

That was a few years ago and maybe times have changed there

Cheers
 

sharkcaver

Well-Known Member
That was a few years ago and maybe times have changed there

Cheers


Ahh Warburton. It's like a scene from mad max, only its real. And it hasn't changed.

The 8ft high fence around the compound you get locked into looks fantastic, but they scale that like an olympic hurdler. The best bet is not to stay in town if you want to keep your possessions.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
Ahh Warburton. It's like a scene from mad max, only its real. And it hasn't changed.

The 8ft high fence around the compound you get locked into looks fantastic, but they scale that like an olympic hurdler. The best bet is not to stay in town if you want to keep your possessions.
I had to fix 2 punctures at the roadhouse. It was DIY with the tyre irons etc outside the servo.

A local helped me. After I left I noticed my wallet was missing. Doh.

It taught me to carry a spare credit card elsewhere in the car.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
We always stay well outside remote towns, would rather a tranquil bush camp
When you get to Giles, here is a nice spot about 1.5km from the highway that you can use, with wood and privacy. It's about 12km SW of town. Nice spot. You easily can drive your Van in, even if it is half "off-road" capable.. Go in on the clear section a few hundred meters to the SW.

 
Top