Great breakdown of near disaster snatching.

John U

Well-Known Member
From the USA. A great breakdown of a very close call during a snatch recovery. Looks like a failure of a soft shackle may have actually ended up saving someone's life. Proves once again how dangerous snatching can be and how important slowing down and reassessing the situation is. All as documented over in the recovery advice forum here on Earth. A reminder doesn't hurt though.

Some very lucky people in this clip.

 

Toyasaurus

Well-Known Member
Interesting,
I guess some points would be don`t snatch when your in a hurry, check your gear, make a plan with the person driving the other truck.
If that had of been me I think I would have winched off the tree.
 

LongRoad2Go

Well-Known Member
A young bloke in a hurry often ends up a casualty in the Darwin Awards. Suppose we're all guilty of that at some point in our lives.

Would've thought the first go-to in snow would simply be a shovel and recovery boards, certainly not the big elastic band.
 

Batts88

Well-Known Member
Snatching a vehicle in general is not dangerous when done with your brain is intact. But there's always an idiot that goes to the extreme so companies spend thousands re - engineering items to try and make them user friendly till the next idiot comes along.
In the mean time things get blown out of proportion, this big fear tactor emerges and false claims are made up about how dangerous performing basic recoveries using certain types of equipment is. Usually blaming the items and quite often not those misusing them. that's just a general comment not a shot at the thread.
 

mikehzz

Well-Known Member
It gets to the point where they say it's a no-no to do a tow off a towball. That's what a towball is for.
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
I am a novice in the recovery scene but Imo using a soft shackle for a winch pull................fine, using it for a snatch..................um I wouldn't even consider it as you go from a slack to full load instantly and the knot could be out of position & pull through??

My question is where was the failure, at the shackle??
 

LongRoad2Go

Well-Known Member
There was a litany of single events that led to that drama, but forgot to mention: he said the dampener/blanket failed to suppress the recoil of the rope ... I would bet they didn't fill the pockets with dirt or snow because ... they were in a hurry.

Would hate to see the bill he got from the Air Rescue and hospital in The Land Of The Free.
 

Loubrey

Member
I am a novice in the recovery scene but Imo using a soft shackle for a winch pull................fine, using it for a snatch..................um I wouldn't even consider it as you go from a slack to full load instantly and the knot could be out of position & pull through??

My question is where was the failure, at the shackle??
The shipping industry have been using Dyneema for over 30 years, so we as 4WD enthusiasts and the accessory market are way behind the 8-ball.

A proper rated soft shackle with the knot chocked back properly still has significantly more tensile strength that a metal shackle, and the instantaneous load should have no detrimental effect. I've not used a metal shackle of any description in recovery for well over 10 years now, and I've never had a slip through or a failure. These guys were rushing, so a number of errors and oversights crept in to this failed recovery.

I personally think that people use kinetic recovery ropes or straps that are rated too high for the weight of their vehicle. The concept relies on the strap stretching and the kinetic energy being transferred to the immobile or "stuck" vehicle. A rope or strap that's rated too high won't do that, and you just end up with a massive jarring force ripping things apart.

My own kit (which I only use for the potential recovery of my own vehicle) consists of a Bubba Rope as kinetic recovery (snatch) Rope. The rope stretches due to it weave, rather than relying on the stretch of the fiber, as most snatch straps do. This allows for a gradual uptake of the load, up to a 30% stretch and then a gradual transfer of the stored kinetic energy to the stuck vehicle. You do not see the jarring impact and massive jerk you see on most recoveries, so choosing the correct equipment is as important as have rated recovery points. Bubba is an American company, but Saber Offroad in Victoria sells comparable quality products.
 

Batts88

Well-Known Member
It gets to the point where they say it's a no-no to do a tow off a towball. That's what a towball is for.
We use to use a towball yrs ago but not going at it like a bull at a gate in saying that I don't think there designed to take shock loads.
These days you remove the towball and replace it with a hitch and D shackle to reduce the risk a bit of something failing. But there's always someone out there who pushes way beyond the limits.
 
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Loubrey

Member
I'm happy i made the decision years ago to winch everything.Especially if it's a stranger getting me out. It's at least controlled.

I've seen enough out of control recoveries. Including myself and others over the years.
Agree 100% and that's still the principle on the 2010 Defender, which to be fair, still does the heavy lifting in mildly extreme 4WDing. The much newer 2022 Defender is still waiting for the aftermarket to catch up with a winch bar (fingers crossed for June 2024).
 

cam04

Well-Known Member
It gets to the point where they say it's a no-no to do a tow off a towball. That's what a towball is for.
When I was a kid in the bush before receiver hitches and nylon slings even existed, it was still taught to me to basket hitch the chain under the bar behind the ball, swap the legs over at the ball, and join the chain - because the ball can break and kill you.
 
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