Fridge/oven setup?

DionSl8r

New Member
Fairly new to 12v setups but just trying to get my head around some things;
1-Fridge wiring? Will probably be getting the bushman 85l upright, but wanting to know how to wire it in. Do I just come straight off the fuse block? And/or use anderson-if so what amp rating and cable gauge needed?
2-Oven wiring? Will probably want it off a switch, so do I use a relay-If so which one? Does using a switch and relay use 2 slots of a fuse block-one that goes to the switch, another to the relay?
3-general gauges of cables needed? Kinda just wanna buy bulk of a few gauges that will cover most things. (Will have projecta 25a charger with solar and alternator, running fridge, oven, lights and a few 12v outlets.)

Thanks in advance, and if there’s any drawings that would be helpful, I’d love to see them!!
 

Triton14

Well-Known Member
Just need a bit more info like type of vehicle type, where you intend putting the Aux & budget would be handy.

You will 100 differing answers & opinions here which is not a bad thing.

There is plenty of info on here to look at if you use the search tab, took me about 12months to research to the point I was confident enough to tackle the job myself.

Oven, what sort? What is the draw?? Most 12V ovens will use an Anderson plug for connection which would be fused/breaker somewhere between it & the Aux.
Cabling, depends on how far you need to go as to not lose to much voltage.

My set up is in the signature area below to look at.

Good luck.
 
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Lost1?

Well-Known Member
Use the below table to work out what you need. I have used 4 AWG for a 25 A DCDC charger. This gives me capacity head room over smaller cables. I use 8 AWG for my fridge and have it hard wired to a fused block. My fridge lives in the back of my ute, it only comes out for a clean now and then. I use 8 AWG for solar too. My solar connection is a 50 A anderson plug. I have used 12 AWG for my driving lights. After you look at the below table you will see everything I have wired is over specced. Voltage drop over a cable run is the greatest issue you can create by using the minimum diameter cable for the known power draw. Good Luck.
1628392077177.png
 

DionSl8r

New Member
Just need a bit more info like type of vehicle type, where you intend putting the Aux & budget would be handy.

You will 100 differing answers & opinions here which is not a bad thing.

There is plenty of info on here to look at if you use the search tab, took me about 12months to research to the point I was confident enough to tackle the job myself.

Oven, what sort? What is the draw?? Most 12V ovens will use an Anderson plug for connection which would be fused/breaker somewhere between it & the Aux.
Cabling, depends on how far you need to go as to not lose to much voltage.

My set up is in the signature area below to look at.

Good luck.
Ford ranger. Aux will be in a canopy. My ranger already had a (simple) factory dual battery setup, but I took that out-but it does still have the cable from the starter battery running to the back. The outside diameter of it is about 10mm—does that mean it’s a ‘000’ awg cable?? Its also got a 125a fuse and puts out 14.8v-does that seem right?

I now know what I’ll be doing with the fridge. As for the oven, will be travel buddy or the kickass version-I think now I just need to know what relay to use so it can be on a switch.
 

DionSl8r

New Member
Use the below table to work out what you need. I have used 4 AWG for a 25 A DCDC charger. This gives me capacity head room over smaller cables. I use 8 AWG for my fridge and have it hard wired to a fused block. My fridge lives in the back of my ute, it only comes out for a clean now and then. I use 8 AWG for solar too. My solar connection is a 50 A anderson plug. I have used 12 AWG for my driving lights. After you look at the below table you will see everything I have wired is over specced. Voltage drop over a cable run is the greatest issue you can create by using the minimum diameter cable for the known power draw. Good Luck.
View attachment 72076
Would you say 8,10 and 12 awg cable is most used/all that would be needed in a fairly basic system (apart from the starter to aux cable)
 

Lost1?

Well-Known Member
8 and 12 AWG will cover most of your needs for Solar, fridge, a water pump for an underbody water tank, LED lights in the canopy. But I don't know the power draw for a travel buddy. A Ford ranger is 5m in length. Allowing for twists and turns as you zip tie the cable in place I would allow for 5m of cable noting you won't run the cable from end to end of your vehicle. Noting cable length and my desire to minimise voltage drop my thoughts are you need 6 AWG for your DCDC charger in the tub of your ute. When you buy cable it will have AWG or mm squared markings. This will inform you of its rating. From another post on this forum I will make an assumption the factory power cable currently in your ute will not cut it.

My crank battery connects to a 50A circuit breaker. The cable for the DCDC charger runs from the circuit breaker to the charger. I have run double insulated 4 AWG from the crank battery to the DCDC charger. Never run a power cable without a fuse in the circuit. I am not an auto elec, but if you don't fuse your circuit it can cause a fire. When the the insulator wears through due to vibration and rubbing against steel body the power cable begins to short against the chassis. This heats the steel to melting point, just like a welder does. From there it is fire, fire, fire. I always sheath my cable in split conduit for peace of mind.

Triton 14 spent a year researching how to wire his ute. I recommend you spend a lot of time on google and looking at other ute fit outs on you tube before undertaking this task. Always ensure you protect your cables with conduit of some type and do not buy the cheap cable with thin insulator around it. When done properly 12V power in your ute makes camping a joy. If you get it wrong, not so much joy.
 

Petunia

Well-Known Member
Do I just come straight off the fuse block? And/or use anderson-if so what amp rating and cable gauge needed?
hi,
you can come off the fuse block, most people use anderson because they are way less likely to shake lose, cable size will depend on how far from the battery the fridge is?
for short to medium short runs even 14ga buntings speaker wire is very good value, the fridge will draw between 2 to 4.5Amps [14ga will handle 10 to 15A]

2-Oven wiring? Will probably want it off a switch, so do I use a relay-If so which one? Does using a switch and relay use 2 slots of a fuse block-one that goes to the switch, another to the relay?

The average oven will draw aprox 8Amp, no relay needed [unless your switch is a long long way from the oven] good quality switch will switch 20Amp on its own.

3-general gauges of cables needed? Kinda just wanna buy bulk of a few gauges that will cover most things. (Will have projecta 25a charger with solar and alternator, running fridge, oven, lights and a few 12v outlets.)

8 to 18ga in my opinion, yet lights only draw sweet not much [~ 5 watt light = 0.5Amp (aprox) I run 4 and 5 watt bulbs from telephone wire 20 to 30meters long] 18ga can suffice. 4ga is nice [if you can get it cheap]

The outside diameter of it is about 10mm—does that mean it’s a ‘000’ awg cable?? Its also got a 125a fuse and puts out 14.8v-does that seem right?

10mm OD = aproxx 4ga ..... 000 will be close to 25mm OD. The fuse is 125a because the alternator will put out up to that value, yes the volts are normal.
 

DionSl8r

New Member
hi,
you can come off the fuse block, most people use anderson because they are way less likely to shake lose, cable size will depend on how far from the battery the fridge is?
for short to medium short runs even 14ga buntings speaker wire is very good value, the fridge will draw between 2 to 4.5Amps [14ga will handle 10 to 15A]



The average oven will draw aprox 8Amp, no relay needed [unless your switch is a long long way from the oven] good quality switch will switch 20Amp on its own.



8 to 18ga in my opinion, yet lights only draw sweet not much [~ 5 watt light = 0.5Amp (aprox) I run 4 and 5 watt bulbs from telephone wire 20 to 30meters long] 18ga can suffice. 4ga is nice [if you can get it cheap]



10mm OD = aproxx 4ga ..... 000 will be close to 25mm OD. The fuse is 125a because the alternator will put out up to that value, yes the volts are normal.
Absolute legend, thanks so much for your time
 

DionSl8r

New Member
8 and 12 AWG will cover most of your needs for Solar, fridge, a water pump for an underbody water tank, LED lights in the canopy. But I don't know the power draw for a travel buddy. A Ford ranger is 5m in length. Allowing for twists and turns as you zip tie the cable in place I would allow for 5m of cable noting you won't run the cable from end to end of your vehicle. Noting cable length and my desire to minimise voltage drop my thoughts are you need 6 AWG for your DCDC charger in the tub of your ute. When you buy cable it will have AWG or mm squared markings. This will inform you of its rating. From another post on this forum I will make an assumption the factory power cable currently in your ute will not cut it.

My crank battery connects to a 50A circuit breaker. The cable for the DCDC charger runs from the circuit breaker to the charger. I have run double insulated 4 AWG from the crank battery to the DCDC charger. Never run a power cable without a fuse in the circuit. I am not an auto elec, but if you don't fuse your circuit it can cause a fire. When the the insulator wears through due to vibration and rubbing against steel body the power cable begins to short against the chassis. This heats the steel to melting point, just like a welder does. From there it is fire, fire, fire. I always sheath my cable in split conduit for peace of mind.

Triton 14 spent a year researching how to wire his ute. I recommend you spend a lot of time on google and looking at other ute fit outs on you tube before undertaking this task. Always ensure you protect your cables with conduit of some type and do not buy the cheap cable with thin insulator around it. When done properly 12V power in your ute makes camping a joy. If you get it wrong, not so much joy.
Legend, thanks so much for that
 

Petunia

Well-Known Member
Absolute legend, thanks so much for your time
You Are Welcome.
If you have 125A fuse and what appears as 4ga, [ the original wire ] I do not see any hassles putting a 25A dc/dc on the end of that, why run a new smaller ga? 4ga is larger than 6ga, the smaller the number the bigger the ga, silly but true.
 

DionSl8r

New Member
You Are Welcome.
If you have 125A fuse and what appears as 4ga, [ the original wire ] I do not see any hassles putting a 25A dc/dc on the end of that, why run a new smaller ga? 4ga is larger than 6ga, the smaller the number the bigger the ga, silly but true.
Sweet as. Would it be needed/better to change the 125a midi fuse to something less like 50amp?
Also in terms of breakers from dcdc to battery and also battery to fuse box, would 50amp breakers each be suggested?
-thanks again
 

Petunia

Well-Known Member
Sweet as. Would it be needed/better to change the 125a midi fuse to something less like 50amp?
Also in terms of breakers from dcdc to battery and also battery to fuse box, would 50amp breakers each be suggested?
-thanks again

As you may/most likely hang the dcdc on then end of the original setup, depending on where the original fuse is? I would be inclined to leave it there and use/add a 30Amp fuse [no more than 40A max] before the dcdc. Fuses handle more than the number on them for very short times, that said a 30A is cheap, if it blows, go to 40A a little dearer.

25 out dcdc to battery, again I would be inclined to use a 30A fuse.

Battery to fuse box, I add up the total value of the fuses, or appliances I run and size accordingly. Eg; 6 x 10A fuses = 60A breaker, my theory being if I load all appliances and draw 99% of the total value of all the fuses, a 50A breaker is not big enough. The caveat is, your feed in wire must handle 60A to split it into 6 x 10 out.

Breakers can always be substituted for where I use the word ''fuse''.

:cool:
 
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