First Aid while 4wding

CaptainBanana

Well-Known Member
My take on 1st aid kits is they are mostly designed to prey on suckers who can't walk without tripping over a guy rope. All this bs stuff you need out there, so much safety it makes me sick. I spent enough dozens of times in and out of a few specialist clinics and average Joe super clinics for a long term cyst to know the stuff us laymen or should I say non ambulance drivers have access to is a joke. Even things like proper guaze you can't get, you should see what surgeons have, then you might understand why I get pissed at these nannies who insist on safety, nurses at super clinics didn't even get good stuff, messed up system. Like for snake bites all you can really do it roll up a bandage. Me my way of life is commando style, go out in the Bush and be prepared to not come back, that is life. I have met a few real army blokes who just walk thru a pure Bush like a bulldozer and are not at all affraid of snakes,spiders etc. Me too I make bear grills look like a boy scout and when kids go away with me I make sure they are safe. 1st aid my a$$

Ummm ok.
 

CaptainBanana

Well-Known Member
Triton,

I did the Simpson Desert in 2012 with My Step-father in His a Prado, took what I thought would be a suitable "First Responder Kit" (My Qualification at the time).

The Photo below, was My kit back in 2012.
- The far Right Trauma Bag (included First Aid Consumables, 2x Sam Splint, Adult Cervical Collars, OxyGen Kit, Medication Kit)
- Yellow Defib and
- Spine Board
is what I took on the Simpson Trip with Me. The spinboard acted as smooth a base for my OzTent to sit on and prevent damage in the Roof Cage.

If We had taken My D22 Navara one the Simpson trip . . . Yes defiantly, I would had to sacrifice majority of my Medical Gear to accommodate extra water and food in the back under the canopy, like in the Prado all our personal stuff - clothing bags etc would had sit on the back seat.

My Patrol, I've had for 12 months now, and with it's Storage Shelves Under the Canopy and 200Lt Built-in Water Tank . . . it has much better, and more available storage arrangements then the D22 Navara ever did. Majority of my Event Consumable are now in 4x 10Lt Plastic Box's: - kids First Aid Supplies Box, Adult First Aid Supplies Box, Burns Box, Trauma Bandage Box, Carboard Splints Kit, Cervical Collar Kit, Sport Medicine Kit (The Red First Aid Kit as shown in the photo) . . . . .,

As I also operate a Medic Motorcycle, My Trauma Kit these days is configured to fit into Two (2) Motorcycle Pannia Bags, and a Small OxyGen Kit on the Bike. I swap the Two Pannia Bags between My bike and My Patrol as needed, and carry a Large OxyGen Kit in the Patrol which carries Extra Trauma Related Supplies as well. I only pull My Trauma Bags out when I have to go to the Casualties or if I have a serious walk-up Casualty, overwise I work out of the boxs.

So realistically, and Remember My Patrol has in Big Red Letter - EVENT MEDIC sign posted on it, so there is an expectation from others I carry gear all the time. But if I was doing the Simpson again in My Patrol, I wouldn't drop too much Medical gear at all from the Patrol, maybe 3 or 4 Boxs/Items at the most - kids First Aid Supplies Box, Adult First Aid Supplies Box, Burns Box, Trauma Bandage Box and My Sport Medicine Kit . . . I'd combine my Minor Consumables Box with My Burns Box, that would free up most of the top shelf, and 1 small shelf.

For 1 or 2 week trip away like the Simpson, I have enough room in the back to throw in a 40Lt Food Box, My Personal Kit Bag, Overnight Bag, Beading (Pillow, Bed sheet, Dona) Bag, Camp Stretcher and Air Mat in the storage area at the back of the Canopy.

Well that's impressive, I'm just about to upgrade my small kit to a slightly bigger kit but this is next level.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
Triton,

I did the Simpson Desert in 2012 with My Step-father in His a Prado, took what I thought would be a suitable "First Responder Kit" (My Qualification at the time).

SNIP

Next time I go to the Simpson, I want you to come, just in case there is a mass terrorist attack event. Good on you.
 

John U

Well-Known Member
Even things like proper guaze you can't get,
Lots of wound dressing stuff is available over the counter at Chemist Warehouse. This isn’t the sort of stuff I’d take 4wding though, unless I knew there was a high chance of significant gravel rash. I’d want reasonably sterile conditions for using this gear. Conditions you get at home in the bathroom but not in the outdoors (usually ).
 

JAFO

New Member
Hi Guys,

My Patrol is My Medical Gear's home, it doesn't get pulled out and put into storage when I get home from jobs, I have no other suitable storage for it, it's in the Patrol all the time. If I come across something on the road or track, I'll offer assistance and use my gear if needed, as it's always there.

I'm also Ex Military as well, so I still think in mind Pack Light, Pack the Essentials Only. I don't have a swag, I hate sleep on the ground, so I use a Camp Stretcher under a Lean-too of the side of the Patrol, even though I have a OzTent, I don't set it up unless the bugs are out.

With that in mind, if I went basic with a First Aid Kit, I'd probably just go with the Survival Range of First Aid Kits. https://survivalfirstaidkits.net.au/

I have had one of the 1st "Survival" First Aid Kits released, about 8 years old now. I like the Mole, Compact Nature, and when you open them up, the compartments fold out and everything is neatly stowed and labelled easy to see.

So my Basic 4wd first Aid Kit would look like this:
"Survival" First Aid Kit - https://survivalfirstaidkits.net.au/collections/first-aid-kits/products/travel-first-aid-kit
"Survival" Snake Bite Kit - https://survivalfirstaidkits.net.au/collections/first-aid-kits/products/snake-bite-kit
5x Size 15 Trauma Bandages - https://www.sentrymedical.com.au/product/wound-dressing-no-15/
2x Israeli Emergency Bandages - https://tacmedaustralia.com.au/collections/supplies/products/emergency-bandage-israeli-bandage
2x Wide - Tactical Tourniquet - https://tacmedaustralia.com.au/collections/supplies/products/sof-tactical-tourniquet-wide
1x Med Kit - Paracetamol, Acetylsalicylic Acid (Aspro) Tabs, Ibuprofen, Electrolyte, Imodium, Stingos.
 

Itcheenut

New Member
Hi,

I've reckon I've read a few recommendations on first aid in the forum but searching doesn't seem to find any of the posts/threads.

Anyway, thought a dedicated thread might be a good idea (if it doesn't already exist).

What are your must haves for a first aid kit when going bush?

Do you pack more first aid gear if going more remote?

What level of first aid training would be the recommended minimum for 1 or 2 members of your trip if going remote?

Where do you store your first aid kit in your vehicle?

Do you have one of those stickers on the outside of your vehicle telling random helpers where they'll the first aid kit?

Is your first aid kit easily accessible?

Do you regularly replace any items in your first aid kit?

Are there any special extras you've added to your kit?

I have a decent first aid kit
but I had it stashed behind my rear seat which would make it time consuming to access if my ute was packed in the usual way for long trips. So I've moved it to an easily accessible space in the rear corner of my canopy but now I'm thinking it'll get hammered by the heat from the sun hitting the rear of the canopy every day.
G'day John

Stuff to stop bleeding - which is the most common reversible cause of death by trauma. This would be bandages and dressings, but if you've got the $ then a proper tourniquet and "quick clot" dressings would be something to consider. Something to help with a snake bite (pressure bandage). An EPIRB or satellite phone to get help/extrication. Also a sling for a broken arm and some way to make a crutch for a broken ankle might also be useful. An EPI-pen for anaphylaxis and ventolin for an asthma attack might also save someone.

But if you need CPR in a remote area your stuffed! Unless someone has a portable defibrillator, but these cost about $2K. And even if they get the old ticker started again, the reason it stopped hasn't been fixed, so your chances of making it are near zero.

Handy stuff for minor conditions could be panadol, nurofen, aspirn (1 tab if you think someone is having a heart attack!) gastro-stop (in case you get the sh#@*), anti-histamine tablets, nausea tablets, something to remove splinters and something to wash out a minor wound. Also some way of irrigating your eyes if they get something in them. A thermal blanket is also good to have.

Cheers
 

Ol' Harley

Member
I've got a decent sized first aid kit that goes with me off road. It's a belt-pack style so I can cary it to where any casualty is, and still have my hands free to get there, e.g. if a car has rolled down a slope and I need to scramble down to it.

There's been lots of good thoughts on this thred, but I'd add one more thing to put into any kit - a small pad of paper and a pencil to write things down. Observations of the patients condition, what medications they're on, landmarks...in an emergency, it's amazing how often you can forget these details when you get to your CB or flag down a truckie with one to get the information to the people who count.

Why a pencil? You can sharpen one with a knife (or even against a rock) and they don't have ink that dries up in storage...
 

TonyF8

Active Member
I'm actually amazed, no one has mentioned imodeum and biz-pectin, two things that will go along way to relieving the symptoms diarrhoea, that can easily come about, dehydration is something that can become fairly critical when suffering from the trotts
 

LurchWA

Active Member
I take a variety of stuff to deal with most common injuries and sickness, cuts, scrapes, burns, gastro etc etc and a sat phone for the more serious stuff. My thinking is call for help and assist until more qualified assistance arrives
 

Patriot

Administrator
I actually did a 2 day first aid course over the weekend, which was really interesting. When off road, I think the most likely things we will see are:

  • Vehicle accident
  • Snake bite
  • Broken / sprained leg
Thinking back to what we have in our first aid kit, which is really light on, I am going to start building up a few more things to put in there. Wouldn't mind getting something like this but I don't think they ship to Austalia.

Sling
SAM Splint
Bandages
Tourniquet
CPR Face shield - to be honest though, if you're doing CPR in the bush, you are probably not in a great situation

We all need to think about a Sat Phone if we are heading out far into the bush.

If you are heading out camping, some parecetamol and imodium is a great idea.
 

Gary Wragg

New Member
G'day John

Stuff to stop bleeding - which is the most common reversible cause of death by trauma. This would be bandages and dressings, but if you've got the $ then a proper tourniquet and "quick clot" dressings would be something to consider. Something to help with a snake bite (pressure bandage). An EPIRB or satellite phone to get help/extrication. Also a sling for a broken arm and some way to make a crutch for a broken ankle might also be useful. An EPI-pen for anaphylaxis and ventolin for an asthma attack might also save someone.

But if you need CPR in a remote area your stuffed! Unless someone has a portable defibrillator, but these cost about $2K. And even if they get the old ticker started again, the reason it stopped hasn't been fixed, so your chances of making it are near zero.

Handy stuff for minor conditions could be panadol, nurofen, aspirn (1 tab if you think someone is having a heart attack!) gastro-stop (in case you get the sh#@*), anti-histamine tablets, nausea tablets, something to remove splinters and something to wash out a minor wound. Also some way of irrigating your eyes if they get something in them. A thermal blanket is also good to have.

Cheers
True about CPR, etc., if you are on your own. Travelling with others gives you some chance as you can't self-administer CPR. Obviously, don't travel alone if you can avoid it.
 

dabbler

Active Member
Your First Aid kit should be clearly marked and easily found by others. It might be used by a total stranger to save YOUR life.

Start with a commercially available kit and add items specific to you and your traveling companions. Things that make life more pleasant but aren't really life-saving belong somewhere else as others have suggested.

Above all check consumables for use by dates and cycle them.
 
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