Employee crushes own work ute with haul truck.

Ditch

Well-Known Member
It is understood the driver of the light vehicle was performing maintenance on the haul truck on the morning of 21 November, at the Brockman 4 iron ore mine near Tom Price, when he ran over his own vehicle.

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Full story - https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-11...9XQzw4Mfo-Wu0C10eQ5cfIsBY3cBUQHTX2uTrbOtBOD0c
 

Batts88

Well-Known Member
Another unhappy Toyo customer or was it ole mate on here looking for the horn relay it's a bit late.
 

rogerazz

4x4 Earth Contributer
Funny how the haul truck's wheels are turned hard right onto the maintenance vehicle? Maybe he was checking the steering ;).
 

Joe Fury

Well-Known Member
G'day Adventurers

Yes it happened and yes there are all sorts of theories as how and why, but it's all down to a single thing ~ human error.

The bloke who managed to park the 'autonomous' haul truck on/over his work ute was testing the haul truck, a direct result of electrical work being done or to be done on the haul truck, he, the 'auto sparky' had not operated a loaded haul truck previously, so the end result is what we see.

The mining industry and the major iron ore miners are setting new boundaries in autonomous or 'robot' technology, in reality it's very clever stuff but a soon as a human is in the mix, things can and at times do go pear shaped.

The haul truck fleet is managed/controlled from a site at the Perth airport technology centre, the truck(s) work on site somewhere in the Pilbara, in this case it's at Rio Tinto's Brockman 4 mine, north west of the town of Tom Price, some 1300+ kilometres from the 'Play Station' controls.

Sadly for this 'Hi Vis Minion' of the modern mining industry, he's probably going to have a real shithouse Christmas and every other bugger in the 'chain of command' will be absolved of all wrong doing.

Safe travels : Joe Fury
 

sharkcaver

Well-Known Member
G'day Adventurers

Yes it happened and yes there are all sorts of theories as how and why, but it's all down to a single thing ~ human error.

The bloke who managed to park the 'autonomous' haul truck on/over his work ute was testing the haul truck, a direct result of electrical work being done or to be done on the haul truck, he, the 'auto sparky' had not operated a loaded haul truck previously, so the end result is what we see.

The mining industry and the major iron ore miners are setting new boundaries in autonomous or 'robot' technology, in reality it's very clever stuff but a soon as a human is in the mix, things can and at times do go pear shaped.

The haul truck fleet is managed/controlled from a site at the Perth airport technology centre, the truck(s) work on site somewhere in the Pilbara, in this case it's at Rio Tinto's Brockman 4 mine, north west of the town of Tom Price, some 1300+ kilometres from the 'Play Station' controls.

Sadly for this 'Hi Vis Minion' of the modern mining industry, he's probably going to have a real shithouse Christmas and every other bugger in the 'chain of command' will be absolved of all wrong doing.

Safe travels : Joe Fury

Just like the driver of the BHP loco that went runaway. Sack the employee and absolve yourself of blame. Easy fix.

He took his case to court and won an unfair dismissal claim - payout was confidential.

He was 62, about ready to retire and his payout will see him through retirement. Everyone wins ;)



Discussion point: does sacking a worker that screwed up solve the issue or does it just shift the blame?
 

dno67

Well-Known Member
Just like the driver of the BHP loco that went runaway. Sack the employee and absolve yourself of blame. Easy fix.

He took his case to court and won an unfair dismissal claim - payout was confidential.

He was 62, about ready to retire and his payout will see him through retirement. Everyone wins ;)



Discussion point: does sacking a worker that screwed up solve the issue or does it just shift the blame?
Bloke l known drives up that way, was telling me all about that runaway. Dollars lost per day was mind blowing, not to mention the work and conditions workers were managing to get the tracks repaired.
We should all stop and ask ourselves at what price ? We're consumed with consumption.
 

Batts88

Well-Known Member
G'day Adventurers

Yes it happened and yes there are all sorts of theories as how and why, but it's all down to a single thing ~ human error.

The bloke who managed to park the 'autonomous' haul truck on/over his work ute was testing the haul truck, a direct result of electrical work being done or to be done on the haul truck, he, the 'auto sparky' had not operated a loaded haul truck previously, so the end result is what we see.

The mining industry and the major iron ore miners are setting new boundaries in autonomous or 'robot' technology, in reality it's very clever stuff but a soon as a human is in the mix, things can and at times do go pear shaped.

The haul truck fleet is managed/controlled from a site at the Perth airport technology centre, the truck(s) work on site somewhere in the Pilbara, in this case it's at Rio Tinto's Brockman 4 mine, north west of the town of Tom Price, some 1300+ kilometres from the 'Play Station' controls.

Sadly for this 'Hi Vis Minion' of the modern mining industry, he's probably going to have a real shithouse Christmas and every other bugger in the 'chain of command' will be absolved of all wrong doing.

Safe travels : Joe Fury
Talking to a Komatsu fellow on site recently he didn't say where but autonomous trucks have ran over 6 cows but the truck will stop for a rock on the ground.
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
That's what happens when you park within the blind spot of the driving position - and the blind spots for those things are huge. For that side you'd need to be parked at least 50 meters away to see the ute. Old mate would obviously been doing some work and was in the process of taking it for a test to either fault find or check if the fault was fixed - didn't see the ute because to was too close
 

Joe Fury

Well-Known Member
Just like the driver of the BHP loco that went runaway. Sack the employee and absolve yourself of blame. Easy fix.

He took his case to court and won an unfair dismissal claim - payout was confidential.

He was 62, about ready to retire and his payout will see him through retirement. Everyone wins ;)



Discussion point: does sacking a worker that screwed up solve the issue or does it just shift the blame?

G'day Shane, good day Adventurers.

There are monumental Klangers that happen in the Pilbara Iron Ore mining industry and for the most part these Klangers are kept in house or secret, hence all the rules regarding mobile phones on site or in the work place, this just puts far too many reporters right there when and where someone pulls a shitter or Klanger.

The establishment hates this 'johnny on the spot' social media reporting, but I for one think it's brilliant, though it can be malicious at times.

I just wonder how a recent murder incident that took place at a Pilbara mine site would have been kept quiet, if it wasn't for social media.

BHP's runaway train is estimated to have cost close to 'half a billion' Dollars and BHP's profit/loss earnings are in American Dollars, yes there are many questions that need answering and I as a share holder would like to know the answers, but I won't hold my breath while they think about it.

This derailment was a set back in production and shipping, but more importantly to BHP their public image was questioned and it all came about due to human error ~ right down the chain of command.

Safe travels : Joe Fury
 

Joe Fury

Well-Known Member
That's what happens when you park within the blind spot of the driving position - and the blind spots for those things are huge. For that side you'd need to be parked at least 50 meters away to see the ute. Old mate would obviously been doing some work and was in the process of taking it for a test to either fault find or check if the fault was fixed - didn't see the ute because to was too close

G'day Shane

For all the years that I worked as a 'Hill Fitter' in the Iron Ore industry. Only when we were given the okay to enter an active work area (red zone) by the shift supervisor and only when the machine operator affirmed our (maintenance) permission to enter via two way radio contact were we allowed to go within the near proximity of the machine, be it a 250 ton capacity haul truck, an hydraulic excavator/face shovel or anything that was operating in a production mode, always made eye to eye contact with the operator before placing wheel chocks, then hooking a permit to work tag on to the main system isolation key, or if the machine was (dead) not manned, a personal danger tag before climbing aboard the unit.

The fitters vehicle had to be parked, with rotating amber beacon on, headlights and safety aerial with reflective flag and red light on and visible, it had to be seen from the machine operators driving position NO QUESTION ~ MANDATORY.

This was more than twenty years ago and we worked as a two man crew, usually with a TA or an apprentice as my offsider then the time and motion studies people suggested 'they' could/would save a bundle of money by going with a lone break down fitter, it's an inherently dangerous occupation no matter what trade your in, lack of expertise, fatigue and general production pressure and possibly supervision pressures can and do lead to a 'lone crew human' pulling a colossal Klanger.

I would have hoped the mining industry of today had learned a thing or two for the better ~ Doesn't look as if they have.

For those who don't know, a 'hill fitter' was purely on active production break down duties, rain or hail, heat dirt and dust, usually with no allotted smoko or meal breaks, as opposed to a workshop fitter (the lucky bastards)

Safe travels, more so if you work on a mine site.
 

Batts88

Well-Known Member
G'day Shane

For all the years that I worked as a 'Hill Fitter' in the Iron Ore industry. Only when we were given the okay to enter an active work area (red zone) by the shift supervisor and only when the machine operator affirmed our (maintenance) permission to enter via two way radio contact were we allowed to go within the near proximity of the machine, be it a 250 ton capacity haul truck, an hydraulic excavator/face shovel or anything that was operating in a production mode, always made eye to eye contact with the operator before placing wheel chocks, then hooking a permit to work tag on to the main system isolation key, or if the machine was (dead) not manned, a personal danger tag before climbing aboard the unit.

The fitters vehicle had to be parked, with rotating amber beacon on, headlights and safety aerial with reflective flag and red light on and visible, it had to be seen from the machine operators driving position NO QUESTION ~ MANDATORY.

This was more than twenty years ago and we worked as a two man crew, usually with a TA or an apprentice as my offsider then the time and motion studies people suggested 'they' could/would save a bundle of money by going with a lone break down fitter, it's an inherently dangerous occupation no matter what trade your in, lack of expertise, fatigue and general production pressure and possibly supervision pressures can and do lead to a 'lone crew human' pulling a colossal Klanger.

I would have hoped the mining industry of today had learned a thing or two for the better ~ Doesn't look as if they have.

For those who don't know, a 'hill fitter' was purely on active production break down duties, rain or hail, heat dirt and dust, usually with no allotted smoko or meal breaks, as opposed to a workshop fitter (the lucky bastards)

Safe travels, more so if you work on a mine site.
In the coal mines you can't put chocks under a loaded truck front wheels included not alowed to walk down the side of the machine but some people still ignore that rule, do it anyway.
 

shanegtr

Well-Known Member
I've always worked in the fixed plant side of things so I have no idea on all the safety regs they guys need to run by un the mobile world. It was apparently night shift so I bet the guy would have had some element of fatigue at play. As with most incidents like this it will either be the bloke trying to take a short cut somewhere, or simple human error
 
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