Dual sim mobile phone

barcher

Well-Known Member
#1
Curious about how these phones work.
Can you manually choose which carrier you want or does it automatically select the stronger carrier?
How many slots are there in the phones. Do you have to sacrifice a memory slot do accommodate a second SIM card?
 

mikehzz

Well-Known Member
#2
You set the default sim for voice and data. When messaging, you have a choice to send from sim1 or sim2. On the front screen of my phone it shows the signal strength for each sim. I've got Telstra and Optus. Wherever I'm staying I swap to the best signal for data. I tend not to touch voice because I don't talk as often as I use the internet. If I'm somewhere like William Creek that only has Optus and I have to make a call, I swap it over manually to Optus for voice. The number my family knows is the Telstra one. I don't even know my Optus number.
 

typhoeus

Well-Known Member
#4
Im using a samsung sm-j250f. Cost about $175 on amazon( first time ive ever trusted them.) It was a good buy. Has 2 sim slots and a memory card slot. Altho i dont use 2 sims, you can call or recieve from either. Its a well made thing with a the bASic stuff on it. It can cast youtube to the tv etc. It doesnt have the hi def camera etc of $1000 phones but i dont need it.
 
#5
My current phone is an OPPO dual sim and it's very flexible.

System settings allow changing default voice, text and data to either sim. Default voice and text can be over-ridden on the fly but data needs to be changed through settings. Info on both is displayed.

Apps like Emergency+, a travel dialing app I used o/s and an older banking app only recognize the default sim. Emergency+ shouldn't matter as 112 and 000 will find any available tower.

I used to travel with Telstra and Optus but about a year ago I ditched the second sim, changed to a better Telstra plan and use a memory card instead (and save movies etc).

I'm not sure how it handles contacts stored on sims but it probably manages both sims. I use cloud and phone not sim storage for contacts.
 
#8
Oppos also have a nice feature where if you want copies of your older call records, conversations, location or browsing history, the Chinese Government will always keep a copy for you. Getting access to it can be hard if you aren't a member of the communist party though.

Just joking if you are listening Mr Xi Jinping.
Yeah they're velly crever, I bought one so I don't have to wolly about backing up my phone...it's in the croud. :)
 
#9
Most but not all dual sim phones are not "Aust Market" phones - basically grey imports so some may not cover the full functions functions of the Aust market - may not have full freq range so in some areas may not get a signal but will probably work fine in metro areas.

The dual sim phones Samsung S9 phones sold by Kogan are an example - they are grey imports - I looked at all this last year when I was looking for a new phone and found the dual sim Samsungs were 20% cheaper than simgle sim units and in researching why found many were grey imports.

There is also the issue of sd slot being taken by the second sim - depending on internal memory may or may not be an issue.
 
#10
My Oppo is actually good. It has great reception, way better than our previous Samsungs. I bought mine first and then instantly had reception at home which is in a dead spot. My wife still had her Samsung and started getting jealous that I could make and receive calls, so I had to buy her one as well. Battery life is outstanding too. I'd never heard of them before.
 

barcher

Well-Known Member
#11
My Oppo is actually good. It has great reception, way better than our previous Samsungs. I bought mine first and then instantly had reception at home which is in a dead spot. My wife still had her Samsung and started getting jealous that I could make and receive calls, so I had to buy her one as well. Battery life is outstanding too. I'd never heard of them before.
Better tell me the model number.
 

boobook

Well-Known Member
#13
Most but not all dual sim phones are not "Aust Market" phones - basically grey imports so some may not cover the full functions of the Aust market - may not have full freq range so in some areas may not get a signal but will probably work fine in metro areas.

The dual sim phones Samsung S9 phones sold by Kogan are an example - they are grey imports - I looked at all this last year when I was looking for a new phone and found the dual sim Samsungs were 20% cheaper than single sim units and in researching why found many were grey imports.

There is also the issue of sd slot being taken by the second sim - depending on internal memory may or may not be an issue.

So true Synchro. Phone companies all over the world use different bands for 3G and 4G. Just because a phone is 3G or 4G, it doesn't mean it will work on all bands in Australia. Telstra uses 850Mhz for 3G, 1800 and 700 mhz for 4G. They call 700 Mhz 4GX. All new country areas use 700mhz.While their choice of frequency is great for the country, not many countries use them. It is possible or likely that the imported phone will have crap coverage outside major city areas.

GPS trackers are particularly bad. Many will say 2G/3G/4G and even Telstra compatible. But unless they work on 850mhz for 3G and 700mhz for 4g, they are almost useless outside capitals.

To see the issue, go to Telstra's coverage website.

https://www.telstra.com.au/coverage-networks/our-coverage

Take a look at the coverage, it shows all bands. That is the coverage you will get if the phone supports the frequencies above. Then click on "standard" to make the map go to detailed.

It shows 4GX ( 700 Mhz) no bad across much of Australia.

Then click 4G ( 1800) this is all that many overseas phones will have. The cupboard is bare outside cities and the east coast.

Then lastly 3G, that has decent coverage across a lot of Australia.

Older phones and some phones brought across from Optus and Vodafail are the same. Any phone older than about 4 years is unlikley to have 700mhz 4G
 
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