Dont overload your Triton

80lover96gxl

Moderator
uploadfromtaptalk1425542205519.jpg
Seems they dont like it.
 

billolga

Well-Known Member
Remember the old XXXX BEER adds? - it was the Mrs bottle of booze that broke the Camels back!
 

stevemc181

Well-Known Member
More like "Don't overload your Ute" Hilux,Triton,Navara, Isuzu, whatever. The web is full of similar stories and they all have the same theme.
 

patrolgu4

Active Member
I've seen similar in Simpson desert a couple of years ago. Not as bad but still chassis cracked/ripped 2/3 trough after the spring hangers.

I think the main culprit in that case was really heavy trailer, loaded towards the hitch with jerry cans full of fuel, tools and etc as motocycles support vehicle, while over the trailer axle and rear overhang there was hardly any weight.

This was 3 months old Triton with 10,000 kms......

Cheers
 

80lover96gxl

Moderator
Tritons seem to be the most susceptible to chassis bending but I guess any 4wd is at risk if incorrectly/ over loaded and or towing with questionable wieght distribution.
 

red hilux

Well-Known Member
its really amazing

They are suppose to have 1 ton carry capacity if placed correctly yet little behind the wheels and snappy snappy
 

80lover96gxl

Moderator
Geez , that hire company didnt do much research on suitable vehicles to fit there campers too, you'd roll out of bed pretty easy in that thing.
 

Toddyh

Well-Known Member
its really amazing

They are suppose to have 1 ton carry capacity if placed correctly yet little behind the wheels and snappy snappy

Not quite accurate. Their payload is around 1000kg. That is meant to include passengers, tow ball weight etc etc. You put a family of 4, plus a trailer on and you have probably used at least half that payload. You then add a tonne to the tray and of course it will end in tears.
 

Les PK Ranger

4x4 Earth Contributer
..
Without a doubt, dual cabs are the most susceptible to his problem, their design is such that for decent ramp over there is naturally more tub or chassis / try hanging behind the rear driveline than in front.

It sure isn't limited to the Triton, but they are one of the most notorious culprits to having this issue, pics make that clear as to why.
Their departure angle is also terrible.

My post here http://www.4x4earth.com.au/forum/general-4x4-discussion/35273-tray-touring-setups-2.html#post450070 shows pics of some very suspect vehicles.
The Iveco Daily shot shows how good they thought it out, my Ranger would probably be one of the best placed rear drivelines / leaf supports of the dual cabs, pic of that put in there for comparo.
I have extra diesel tank up front of tub and water tank centre slightly forward of rear axle, helps with keeping weight forward even on big trips.

The 100 dual cab looks like a converted wagon, but is very poor in engineering (wonder if it was engineered if a home made dc ?).
It and the red Nav both look slightly bent already too.
Even the Hilux Extra cab had issues because of that camper back and possible extended chassis.

Anyway, careful loading with heavier items up front of diff, and some thought as to addition of rear racks / what's carried and where, should see most vehicles not have issues.
 

80lover96gxl

Moderator
Intersting pics Les

This no doubt would be the strongest of the lot
uploadfromtaptalk1427089964932.jpg

This cruiser would be 2nd, looks to be only about 400mm of tray behind the chassis, and its a big strong section of chassis there mate designedto handle the wieght if a loaded wagon.

The slight angle of the tray dropping at the rear is very common for a tray fitted to a chopped wagon.
 

Les PK Ranger

4x4 Earth Contributer
Intersting pics Les

This cruiser would be 2nd, looks to be only about 400mm of tray behind the chassis, and its a big strong section of chassis there mate designedto handle the wieght if a loaded wagon.

The slight angle of the tray dropping at the rear is very common for a tray fitted to a chopped wagon.

The cruiser wagon would have a good metre and a bit behind the axle there (you probably mean behind the rear leaf mount), but yeah, I thought about the cruiser Brian, and agree, they chassis strength alone would cope with overhang that will kill other utes.
 

80lover96gxl

Moderator
The cruiser wagon would have a good metre and a bit behind the axle there (you probably mean behind the rear leaf mount), but yeah, I thought about the cruiser Brian, and agree, they chassis strength alone would cope with overhang that will kill other utes.

Yeah a meter atleast mate behind the axle and spring mounts,,but a good solid 500mm of chassis under the tray.
Its suprising, by chopping that back section of wagon off behind the doors reduces wieght considerably, a try loaded with gear works out similar to having the back section of the wagon loaded and with a roof rack on with gear up top very much the same.
 

mauriceb

Well-Known Member
A bit off subject, Just like to show you this one that i saw on my wifes facebook .Very interesting, Muc the truck would like it in this thread "airbags dont go there"
 

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