Climate Change - Biggest Money Making Con of the Century or Imminent Extinction of the Human Race

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
How do we plan for that??
Maybe do some research on what % of the population lives near the ocean, would be pretty hard to convince them all to move inland.
Might be a better idea not to bury our heads in the sand, look at the facts and reality then take appropriate action and not worry about the cloudy days

I agree, in practical terms it is not going to happen until an area becomes uninhabitable. Can you imagine trying to remove people from their homes and resettle somewhere else that they don’t want to be and ask them to sit back for X amount of years to see that we did the right thing moving them.
 

John U

Well-Known Member
an annoyance of mine is we arent planning for water levels rising despite knowing their melting...
I reckon the rising intensity of weather events, and them happening more often, is what we’ll need to worry about first. Ecosystems could change drastically due to this which may effect food supply.
Eg. repeated intense fires burning the bush before it has time to recover, kelp forests being wiped out due to tropical fish moving south.
 

peterfermtech

Well-Known Member
I reckon the rising intensity of weather events, and them happening more often, is what we’ll need to worry about first. Ecosystems could change drastically due to this which may effect food supply.
Eg. repeated intense fires burning the bush before it has time to recover, kelp forests being wiped out due to tropical fish moving south.
Or rain events moving further inland and making our interior greener.
That was the predictions in the early 90's.
 

John U

Well-Known Member
Or rain events moving further inland and making our interior greener.
That was the predictions in the early 90's.
That could also impact what was a dry ecosystem. I don't think anyone knows what the impacts will be but loss of biodiversity is likely.

Stuff that doesn't appear to be related to our food supply might end up having a big impact. We don't know.
 

peterfermtech

Well-Known Member
That could also impact what was a dry ecosystem. I don't think anyone knows what the impacts will be but loss of biodiversity is likely.

Stuff that doesn't appear to be related to our food supply might end up having a big impact. We don't know.
And that exactly is my issue with the climate change debate. Nobody knows with any certainty but behaves as if it is the gospel. It has become a religious debate not a scientific debate.
 

John U

Well-Known Member
And that exactly is my issue with the climate change debate. Nobody knows with any certainty but behaves as if it is the gospel. It has become a religious debate not a scientific debate.
If we wait for certainty a problem like an ecosystem collapse will unlikely to be able to be undone. If we want to avoid the collapse of an ecosystem we need to look at the predictions (based on trends) and take a risk vs cost vs benefit based approach.
 

G_ute

Well-Known Member

This comment struck me:

Many of us would still use cancerous pesticides if governments didn’t ban them. Many doctors would prescribe dangerous pharmaceuticals if governments didn’t ban them. Many people would drive at outrageous speeds through neighborhoods if we didn’t set legal limits.
 

LurchWA

Active Member
For those who believe the lie promoted by governments and fossil fuel industry that solar can't cover Australia's power needs.
At last some good factual news
Doesnt look like it does much at night time though mate!
 

mikehzz

Well-Known Member
Doesnt look like it does much at night time though mate!
It would be good if they could think up some sort of a device that stores the electricity so you can use it later. Or maybe they could use the daytime electricity to pump water into a dam up on a hill, then let the water run back down the hill through a turbine that drives a generator while it's dark. The water gets up there for free when it rains, what a bonus.
 

peterfermtech

Well-Known Member
Or we could just use the solar electricity to produce ammonia which is used for fertilisers replacing the gas that is now burnt to produce it. We could even make methane and use it in gas fired power plants to meet peak demand.
Hey! But everyone knows that gas is evil.
 

discomatt

Well-Known Member
Doesnt look like it does much at night time though mate!
Your right, best thing to do is just keep going the way we are, don't worry about what world we are leaving for our kids and who cares about 2 generations time, they won't even need a planet with all the options of going into space.
As far as doing things yourself, there is a lot more than dumping solar on the roof and getting a warm glow about yourself, do you eat meat? how much meat? I know a few vegans who do it for no other reason than the environment, they are the real environmentalists. How many would make that choice? Do you buy food from overseas? Does 3/4 of your food come wrapped in plastic? Do you still live in the dark ages and use cling wrap?
The list of being environmentally responsible is miles long as is the list of things that need to change for future generations
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
It would be good if they could think up some sort of a device that stores the electricity so you can use it later. Or maybe they could use the daytime electricity to pump water into a dam up on a hill, then let the water run back down the hill through a turbine that drives a generator while it's dark. The water gets up there for free when it rains, what a bonus.

The ability to store power is the missing link we need to resolve to pave the way for our renewable energy. Cracking that will be the big game changer
 

G_ute

Well-Known Member
Or maybe we radically reduce power use at night, limited to use which can be provided with the limited storage technologies we have now (batteries, hydro)
Which means we make and buy stuff in the day time an not 24.x7. Why does eveything need to be open 24 hours?
But that will reduce 'economic activity' so it will never fly.
 

Albynsw

Well-Known Member
Or maybe we radically reduce power use at night, limited to use which can be provided with the limited storage technologies we have now (batteries, hydro)
Which means we make and buy stuff in the day time an not 24.x7. Why does eveything need to be open 24 hours?
But that will reduce 'economic activity' so it will never fly.

Don’t forget that all this solar energy we are talking about is in the framework of running a domestic home. We still need to run big business and the country’s infrastructure, just to put a bit of perspective on how short of the mark we still are
 

G_ute

Well-Known Member
I was thinking of big industry and the drive to have it run 24x7, to feed our thirst for consuming things.
Back to the old days - just about everyone working a day shift only, factories stop at night, mining stops at night, shops close at night.
Sure, it wont work for many industries, but it could for plenty.

Even back to practically nothing being open in Sundays, only 'essentials' like the pub and servo. People just have to organise themselves better, find something else to do other than shopping for one day a week (I remeber when most shops were not open on Saturdays either)

Slow the pace.

Maybe I should join the Amish, minus the god-bothering part!
 

peterfermtech

Well-Known Member
I just don't get it. As soon as you mention gas and even hydrogen everyone runs for cover.
50% of the worlds food production depends on ammonium based fertilisers and 1% of the worlds CO2 emissions comes from manufacturing NH3. Australia produces around 6% of the worlds production all from burning natural gas.
Wouldn't this be a far better way to cut emissions than relying on people to turn off their low energy LED's
 
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